1. #1
    -HH-Dubbo's Avatar Senior Member
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    The updates look great but I have a question about last week's screenies. The rockets on the rails look as though the warheads are flared compared to the body of the rocket. (They look knobby)
    The loosed ones in flight look different in that the warheads look flush with the body of the rocket...no knobby bit. Is it just me? Am I missing something? Also the ones in flight look actually shorter than the ones on the rails. (This could be an optical illusion)




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  2. #2
    -HH-Dubbo's Avatar Senior Member
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    The updates look great but I have a question about last week's screenies. The rockets on the rails look as though the warheads are flared compared to the body of the rocket. (They look knobby)
    The loosed ones in flight look different in that the warheads look flush with the body of the rocket...no knobby bit. Is it just me? Am I missing something? Also the ones in flight look actually shorter than the ones on the rails. (This could be an optical illusion)




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  3. #3
    Differant rockets mate.
    The ones still on the plane are 5" HVARs, the two 'in-flight' are Tiny Tims.
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  4. #4
    -HH-Dubbo's Avatar Senior Member
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    Ahhhh. Thanks I see now...centre mounted hard points..


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  5. #5
    When I saw those pictures...I was thinking that I was looking at an F4U-4. I didn't know the D model had Tiny Tim rockets.

    Are there any Corsair experts who can clarify the ordinance carrying differences between the D and 4 model. I do hope we get the Super Corsair!
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  6. #6
    stansdds's Avatar Senior Member
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    The -1D and the -4 had identical armament capabilities. Both had six 50 caliber machine guns, hard points under each outer wing panel for a maximum of eight 5 inch HVAR rockets, two pylons under the center section for drop tanks or bombs up to 1000 pounds and a center hardpoint for an additional drop tank.
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  7. #7
    I found this page with a tiny tim carrying -1D
    and also a PBJ and F6F carrying them

    http://www.chinalakealumni.org/1945.htm

    F4U-4
    This version was the last Corsair version to be developed during World War 2. It was based on the F4U-1, but had a number of improvements. The powerplant was 1 Ó” Pratt & Whitney R-2800-18W(C) or -42W(C) double Wasp radial with water injection. Withou injection the rated power was 2,100 hp (1.566 kW), with water injection it was increased to 2,450 hp (1.827 kW). This powerplant drove a Hamilton-Standard four-blade propeller with a diameter of 13 ft 2 in (4,01 m). The max level speed rose from 425 mph (684 km/h) to 446 mph (718 km/h). The cockpit was revised with regrouped instruments, an armored bucket seat and an improved canopy. Armor weight increased to 197 lb (89,4 kg). the carburetor air inlets were relocated from the wing leadin gedges to the underside of the engine cowling, and the seat back could be folded to ease access to the radio equipment for maintenance.
    The first two prototypes were conversions from the F4U-1 standard, but all subsequent prototypes were freshly built. These also had capability for the two hardpoints under the inner wing panels to carry two 11.75 in (298 mm) unguided rockets as an alternative to the more standard 1,000 or 500 lb (454 or 227 kg) bombs. The later prototypes confirmed that the revised type offered a number of important advantages over the F4U-1 series, and the F4U-4 was rushed into production for the delivery of the first such warplane to the US Navy during October 1944.
    Number built: 2.197

    but it appears that the -4 was the first to carry the tiny tim
    (correct me if i am wrong first F4U with a four bladed prop)

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  8. #8
    I guess I'm really hoping that Luthier doesn't forget the -4 model. It was the fastest of the WWII vintage corsairs and it had a climb rate over 4000 ft/min...right up there with the Spitfire Mk IX that we're flying now! I know this varient was used extensively around Okinawa. I don't know if there are any outwardly physical differences or just a new tune to the FM...I have my fingers crossed.

    Not having it would be like FB w/out the Dora...not essential, but feeling like something is really missing.
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  9. #9
    GT182's Avatar Banned
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    Wasn't the front antenna moved on the 4 to behind the cockpit from in front for better visability?

    "GT182" / "Stab/JG51_vonSpinmeister"
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    "Fly to Survive, Survive to Fly"
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  10. #10
    stansdds's Avatar Senior Member
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    The F4U-4 had the same antenna arrangement as the FG-1D. This is to say that both forward and aft masts were present and the antenna lead into the fuselage was relocated to the port side about a foot below the canopy track. By the time the Korean War broke out, all of the forward masts had been removed. The dash 4's were the last Corsairs to come off the assembly line with the forward masts.
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