1. #1
    Hi, I was wondering if we could get any of the Japanese speaking members to help translate what is said in this video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gESpk...saburo%20sakai

    Looks and sounds interesting. Would love to know what he's saying.
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  2. #2
    Hi, I was wondering if we could get any of the Japanese speaking members to help translate what is said in this video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gESpk...saburo%20sakai

    Looks and sounds interesting. Would love to know what he's saying.
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  3. #3
    I too would love to know..I have a few Japanese friends so I'll ask for some assistance.

    Hopefully theyll be able to tell me in some detail what he is saying since its already obvious its about aerial tactics.
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  4. #4
    O.K, who else do you think would undertake this task? I happen to have some spare time.... (WE NEED MORE JAPANESE PARTICIPANTS!)

    Here is the excerpt, of the excerpt (the voice recording is shortened, and Sakai's sentence jumps from one topic to another.);

    "Strengths of Zero; First and foremost, Zero had a long range. Unless you can fly for a long time, you can't beat your opponent no matter how good the airplane is. Second, thanks to the superb design by the chief engineer Mr. Jiro Horikoshi, elevators and the stick are perfectly synchronized. I could control Zero's vertical motion perfectly whether in high speed or low speed maneuvering."

    "Once you get behind the opponent, within the range of 35 - 40 meters, they can never escape."

    "Although it was very rare, if I found myself being chased, I would make twisted loop 3 or 4 times, then I could get behind them."

    "The pilot must pay attention to the rear of his plane. If you look the front side 20%, you have to look the rear 90%. (Note by J: 20% plus 90% is of course 110%, I guess Sakai is emphasizing the importance of looking the rear). Those pilots who don't pay attention to the rear die." (Note: The rear view of Zero was very good.)

    "Weaknesses of Zero. First, it was very light, hence fragile. We always felt vulnerable, because the airframe breaks down if you go too fast. Second, earlier models had virtually no protection."

    "When we fly hundreds of miles to attack the enemy base, we used the parachute only as a cushion. Even though it was not forced by the higher ups, we left the belts of parachute behind. This is because of the concept "never become a POW." Once your plane is damaged over the enemy territory, the only choice was to blow up yourself. In hindsight, many lives of pilots were wasted for this reason."

    Sakai also talks about how he was injured, but managed to return to Rabaul. He almost lost his consciousness, and could not see the compass because of eye injury. He was over the ocean with no islands in his sight, got lost, thought he would "fly straight to Hawaii" (Note : I think that's his joke), because he had no idea where he was. But at some point, he guessed Rabaul was on his left, decided to gamble to make a 90 degrees turn, then he found the base. (This last episode is described in detail in his book.)
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  5. #5
    joeap's Avatar Senior Member
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    Thanks J_A, I wonder when this interview took place looks to be in the 70s or 80s.

    Funny how all great pilots said similar things...the 90% 20% quote is excellent.
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  6. #6
    Truly one of the great pilots of our age, survives a bullet to the head and goes on to fly across the coean and make it back to base.... wow


    too bad he died recently :-(
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  7. #7
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by joeap:
    Thanks J_A, I wonder when this interview took place looks to be in the 70s or 80s.

    Funny how all great pilots said similar things...the 90% 20% quote is excellent. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    The title of the clip says 1975, 30 years after WW2 ended. My guess is, the interview was conducted for advertisement campaign of a movie. I remember reading his essay in a magazine in Japan in 1980's when I still lived there as a kid. Some readers criticized him on the ground that he participated in the war and killed people (note: all Japanese ww2 veterans who volunteered to the armed forces were often treated like jermine in the society). He responded, yes he killed people during combat, but the most important thing is to let younng generation know what happened so that it will not repeat again.
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  8. #8
    Thanks for the translation.
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  9. #9
    J_A your translation is perfect
    I have another version of interview IJA 64th Kato Oscar sentai's ace pilot Yohei Hinoki .
    do you guys want to see?
    I'll try to upload if somebody want.
    S~
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  10. #10
    Treetop64's Avatar Senior Member
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    Intersting paint scheme on the car, Hidekichi-san! Is that a land-bound A5M series?
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