1. #1
    I don't know if it is in print anymore but if you have interest in the Atlantic convoy battles, this is a great novel. Written by C.S. Forester of "Hornblower" fame (and "The African Queen"), the novel follows the commander of a four ship escort group through about three days of intense convoy battle in the North Atlantic. Been on my shelf since I was a little kid.
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  2. #2
    I don't know if it is in print anymore but if you have interest in the Atlantic convoy battles, this is a great novel. Written by C.S. Forester of "Hornblower" fame (and "The African Queen"), the novel follows the commander of a four ship escort group through about three days of intense convoy battle in the North Atlantic. Been on my shelf since I was a little kid.
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  3. #3
    Concur completely. One of my favorite WWII novels.

    Another very good C.S. Forester read about WWII naval action is "Gold from Crete". This is a collection of stories about a British destroyer in the Med in the early days of the war.

    Forester also wrote "Sink the Bismark", from whence the movie I'm sure everyone here is familiar with.

    His book "Brown on Resolution", was set in WWI, but is an excellent book. There were two movies made from this, one in 1935 (which I haven't seen), and one made after WWII, "Single Handed". The latter adaptation moved the action to WWII, but was otherwise faithful to the book.

    Nicholas Monsarrat wrote the definitive dramatization of the Battle of the Atlantic from the British viewpoint, the unforgettable "The Cruel Sea". It was made into a very faithful, very good movie in the 50's, featuring quite a few real WWII warships.

    For us Yanks, the U.S. Navy is well represented in "The Caine Mutiny", "Mr. Roberts", "Wake of the Wahoo", "Run Silent, Run Deep" (most made into movies).

    U.S. naval surface action is well represented in the movies "Away All Boats" (also a novel), "The Enemy Below" (a novel), and "The Sullivans" (the Sullivan brothers, who all died on the same ship; the movie was made and released during the war).

    U.S. Aircraft carrier action is vividly recounted in the documentary film "The Fighting Lady", composed exclusively of real newreel, combat footage, and gun camera film, released in '44. It follows the USS Yorktown for several months during the height of the Pacific war.

    The movie "Action in the North Atlantic" focuses on the U.S. merchant Marine, in the great convoy battles of the Atlantic.

    British Battle of the Atlantic surface action is portrayed in "In Which We Serve", made and released in 1942.

    For a dose of 60's angst and nihilism, the movie "Code Name: Morituri" is a very close look at a tramp steamer trying to get home to Germany with valuable cargo, while beset by spies, traitors, Nazi fanatics, and the Royal Navy.

    It stars Yule Brynner and Marlon Brando (need I say more), so there is emough scenery chewing, self-doubt, and cynicism to fill several movies. The plot and the characters are a bit over the top (actually, quite a bit over the top...), but it's fun.

    (I only say "realistic" because almost all of the action is confined to shipboard, on a real rusting freighter, with lots of crawling around in the machinery spaces. It's a real ship, instead of sets, so the ship becomes an important part of the movie, and just not a setting.)

    There are literally 10's of thousands of WWII novels, and 1000's of movies. I can recommend all of the above as worth reading or watching, or both.
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  4. #4
    Chrystine's Avatar Senior Member
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    Very informative, thanks CRSutton and SleazyWombat.

    Several months ago, I came across a referenced work in one of my books on the war in the Atlantic, namely, Monsarrat€s €˜The Cruel Sea€ which sounded (sounds) fascinating from the little mention given €" but I€ve known nothing about it per se.

    I€ll now add it to my €˜to acquire reading€ list and look for it as well.
    Is it also a novel? Or is it historiography?
    Considering the work I have here which mentioned it, I€d be a little surprised if it€s fictional €" surprised, not disappointed. It still sounds like a great read.

    I€ll likewise see what I can find of Forester€s works €" chiefly €˜The Good Shepherd€ and €˜Gold from Crete.€

    Thanks much for the references.

    Best,
    ~ C.

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  5. #5
    doug.d's Avatar Senior Member
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Chrystine:
    Several months ago, I came across a referenced work in one of my books on the war in the Atlantic, namely, Monsarrat€s €˜The Cruel Sea€ which sounded (sounds) fascinating from the little mention given €" but I€ve known nothing about it per se. I€ll now add it to my €˜to acquire reading€ list and look for it as well. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    You may not enjoy The Cruel Sea Tia, the featured (and fictional) ship, "HMS Compass Rose" is a Flower-class corvette!

    The naval novel that knocked my socks off when I was at an impressionable age, and sparked a lifelong interest in things naval/WWII, was Alistair MacLean's HMS Ulysses, about the hardships experienced by a British cruiser escorting an arctic convoy to Murmansk. I read it several times and each time it filled me with a sense of awe. I even seem to remember crying at the end of it.
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  6. #6
    vanjast's Avatar Senior Member
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    Dougy... sniff .. sniff.
    You make me cry...bwahhhwahhhwahhhh

    These movies/books sound great. I can vaguely remember a few (sh.1.t I sound old). Anyone know where we can get these on DVD's

    Dah
    Van
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  7. #7
    Chrystine's Avatar Senior Member
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    Hi, and thanks Doug €"

    €œ You may not enjoy The Cruel Sea Tia, the featured (and fictional) ship, "HMS Compass Rose" is a Flower-class corvette!€

    D€oh!

    Thanks for the mention and clarification regarding the nature of that title.
    I think I€ll still try to find it and give it a read tho€, it seems a highly regarded one and I imagine so for some good reason.

    Thanks also for the mention of A. MacLean€s €˜HMS Ulysses,€ another I€ll add to the list here.

    Best,
    ~ C.

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  8. #8
    "The Cruel Sea" is the Das Boot of books.

    It is that good.

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  9. #9
    doug.d's Avatar Senior Member
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Baldricks_Mate:
    "The Cruel Sea" is the Das Boot of books./QUOTE]
    I thought "Das Boot" was the Das Boot of books?
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  10. #10
    Yeah,

    I assummed that most people were familiar with the movie and that it is a standard to which other things can be judged...

    OK, "The Cruel Sea" another definitive text of The Battle of the Atlantic.
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