1. #1
    hueywolf123's Avatar Senior Member
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    I was sent to the AM sector to patrol grid 53, a ridiculous ask considering I'm in a type IID, but anyhow.
    On my way I spot a light ship, but he takes four fish. I only did this as practice, but got carried away wanting an easy score.
    With only two fish left, I then ran into a large cargo. I put one into his bow, the next I sent under his keel, midships.
    He was still going, so I surfaced, got to almost point blank and used my AA gun to start a few fires.
    Out of AA ammo, I got cranky and rammed him, midships on the other side.
    We sustained only minor damage, but within 2hrs real time, circling him, he finally sank.
    I was just off the English east coast, a silly place to be doing these things, but made it home unscathed.
    Don't fall for those lightships, they're only good for the return if you have nothing else
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  2. #2
    hueywolf123's Avatar Senior Member
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    I was sent to the AM sector to patrol grid 53, a ridiculous ask considering I'm in a type IID, but anyhow.
    On my way I spot a light ship, but he takes four fish. I only did this as practice, but got carried away wanting an easy score.
    With only two fish left, I then ran into a large cargo. I put one into his bow, the next I sent under his keel, midships.
    He was still going, so I surfaced, got to almost point blank and used my AA gun to start a few fires.
    Out of AA ammo, I got cranky and rammed him, midships on the other side.
    We sustained only minor damage, but within 2hrs real time, circling him, he finally sank.
    I was just off the English east coast, a silly place to be doing these things, but made it home unscathed.
    Don't fall for those lightships, they're only good for the return if you have nothing else
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  3. #3
    That's the problem, you're in a Type II Class U-boat.

    Forget the midget sub stuff with the small tonnage scores and get yourself an Type IX Class. Then you could blast away an entire convoy and still have more than a half a tank of fuel left!
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  4. #4
    hueywolf123's Avatar Senior Member
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    Desparate to get enough points to afford one, very hard to do when I don't have enough range to reach my patrol grid
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  5. #5
    Kaleun1961's Avatar Senior Member
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    Sounds like you need to use SH3 Commander; it allows you to select your own patrol zone. Usually I go with the one assigned by the game, but if it gives me a ridiculous patrol zone, such as your situation, then I assign myself a more realistic one. Same thing if it assigns me the same one several times in a row.
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  6. #6
    hueywolf123's Avatar Senior Member
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    I am, but haven't installed the GWX corrections to it. I'll try that tonight, see if I can have a big boat
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  7. #7
    klcarroll's Avatar Banned
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    A TypeIX boat??? ..................Moooooo!

    A TypeIID is just the ticket for inshore work and port raiding!

    It will out-turn and out-dive your over-sized sausage! .....and speaking of size, the TypeII is very nearly half the size of the TypeIX, making it hard to spot on the surface, and tough for Tommy to locate with his Hi-Fi set, when it's submerged!

    I can't tell you the number of times I've rode up and over sub nets, (on my way into an English port) with only minimal damage. (The Kort Nozzles do a great job of protecting the screws from fouling!) In a similar situation, a TypeIX driver would have no alternative but to call the Auto Club!

    The lack of a heavy deck gun isn't that big a deal if you "tweak" the performance of the 20mm flaks up to real-world levels: ......I have had patrols where I have added five small merchants to "the bag", using the 20mms. You just pull up to within 300 meters, and saw them apart! (......and BTW, a rapid fire 20mm is the perfect tool for teaching "Merchant Tommies" not to play with guns!)

    Sure, if you're into Trans-Atlantic trips, the TypeIX is OK (I guess.), but if you want to go right to where Tommy lives, you want a TypeII!
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  8. #8
    I hear you with the ridiculous patrol zones for the Type II.
    I got sent to an AN patrol sector...I spent most of my time just on fuel maintanance.....until I expended all my fish and sent out a patrol report about a third of the way there. Thankfully they had me return to port!

    They gave me medals and promotions for that patrol....how important is it to hand these out? What would the guidelines be?...Can you really tell who deserves it?

    M.K.
    Knight165
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  9. #9
    @ klcarroll

    That's just like comparing a flyweight boxer to a heavyweight. Sure, the Type II's are quick, nimble, has a few punches and can dance around their opponents with ease. But nine times out of ten, they lack that K.O. punch to "finish the job", and unfortunately war isn't decided by a Split Decision!

    If you fight the IX Class, yeah you may move around a bit faster and dodge a little better than him. But, if you slip up and he connects that right hook, then you're in trouble because he has 23 other punches that can follow the first one! Not to mention that he's also a hard bastard to drop to the canvas!

    BTW, most guys prefer to have an over-sized sausage, rather than a small wiener. God, I love these sub vs sub debates!

    Here's my not-so-famous quote:
    "It's not hard to drive an IX class U-boat, you just have to anticipate things a little sooner than usual."
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  10. #10
    klcarroll's Avatar Banned
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    @ AO1_AW_SW_USN

    OK, ........I know from your previous posts that you have first hand submarine experience, which I can't claim; ......But I think I can hold my own on the basics, so let's go!

    Your "Flyweight vs Heavyweight" analogy isn't really accurate. The last time I looked, I was carrying the same torpedoes you do! .....So what we really have in the TypeIID is an agile "Flyweight" with the same right hook as the "Heavyweight" fighter! The fact that you have 20 more "right hooks" is really of no consequence, if I connect with my first one!

    But since the TypeII and the TypeIX boats weren't designed to fight each other, let's move on to what they were intended for.

    The TypeIIs were designed as "Costal Boats": .....This means that they had to deal with shallow water, coastal weather conditions, and almost constant surface and air patrols: .....Under these conditions, a small visual profile and rapid dive time are far more important than another 15 or 20 torpedoes in the rack.

    If you study the English costal waters and the North Sea, you will quickly note that in most of that area, a TypeIX would be a liability, not an asset! The surface and air patrols prevent you from spending a lot of time on the surface, thereby negating the theoretical surface speed advantage of the larger boat. Your size means aircraft can see you from a much greater distance, and your slow dive times mean that you're still within 10 meters of the surface when they arrive to deliver your airmail!

    In that same area, the average water depth limits you to the same working depths as the TypeII: .....The only problem is you displace over three times as much as a TypeII, and you have no chance of hiding! (Heck! ....when a DD passes over you, all the steel in your hull probably deflects all of the compasses on board!)

    Now in a TypeIID, you enjoy a small visual (and later, radar) profile, and a 25 second dive time. Not only that, but I can turn in less than 60% of the distance your TypeIX would require: ......So when an aircraft prompts an "ALARM", not only am I submerged by the time he gets to my location, but I am heading in an entirely different direction than the one he last noted.

    Now if we're talking about evading DDs, then the first thing I have to mention is that there is a HUGE difference between a 360 ton target and a 1200 ton target when you're trying to find it with ASDIC: ....Secondly, my rate of turn gives me an excellent chance of sticking a torpedo into that "Tin Can" as he trolls around looking for me!

    .....And as far as weather conditions go; ...they can be described in one word; "FOG": ..........and I say "Bring It On!". Fog is my friend! A good heavy fog is my license to commit surface mayhem, secure in the knowledge that I will always see them before they see me. (I have had Town Class destroyers pass me so closely that I could count smokestacks in the gloom; ....and they never had a clue!)

    The limitations a TypeII works under are not as bad as one might think: ....A total of six torpedoes isn't a crippling deal when the run back to base is only two or three days! A TypeII can shoot everything it's got in a day, go back to base, and be back on patrol in less than 20 days. This translates into 18 torpedoes delivered to Tommy during the same time your TypeIX will deliver 20-23 on one of it's Trans-Atlantic cruises!

    Finally, let's not forget the Bean-Counters! It has been correctly observed that the cost of a submarine tends to be directly proportional to it's size: .....This means the The BDU can have THREE TypeIID boats for the cost of one TypeIX! If your objective is to control the approaches to England, then you have to admit that three TypeIIs will do a better job than one TypeIX! .....An important side issue is that a TypeII can be crewed by 22 men, while the TypeIX requires 45-50: ...Not an insignificant point during wartime, when there are never enough trained personnel.

    Now don't get me wrong: ....I'm not a small boat fanatic! I simply believe in using the correct tool for the job. I know I am never going to sail to the Caribbean in my TypeIID: .......That's what the TypeIXs were built for. (My appeals elsewhere for the Narwhal Class boats to be included in SHIV shows that I do appreciate the virtues of "Big Boats" too!)

    But, if the job is to CONTROL the coastal waters around the U.K.; .......well then, .....don't bring a pickup truck to a motorcycle race!

    .......Oh yes, .......concerning your comment: "BTW, most guys prefer to have an over-sized sausage, rather than a small wiener.": ........Well, ....Wise men have know for centuries that it's not the size, ...it's how you use it!!
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