1. #1




    http://www.skinnersheaven.com

    The Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka ("cherry blossom") was a purpose-built kamikaze aircraft employed by Japan towards the end of World War II. US servicemen gave the aircraft the Japanese name Baka ("fool") out of spite.

    It was a small flying bomb that was carried underneath a bomber to within range of its target; on release, the pilot would fire the Ohka's engine and begin his dive towards the target.

    The first operational Ohkas (Type 11 and Type 21) were powered by solid fuel rocket motors, which provided great speed but only very limited range. This was problematic as it required the carrier aircraft to approach close to the target, making them very vulnerable to fighter defences.

    The Ohka Type 22 was designed to overcome this problem by using a thermojet style jet engine, the Tsu-11. This engine was successfully tested, and Ohkas were built to accept this engine, but none appear to have been used operationally.

    The final stage in Ohka development was the Type 43, which was intended to be powered by an Ne-20 turbojet. Two trainer versions were also under development for this version, the K-1 and the K-1 Kai, the former being a glider, and the latter fitted with a single rocket motor.

    Some 850 were built, mostly Type 11.
    Share this post

  2. #2




    http://www.skinnersheaven.com

    The Yokosuka MXY-7 Ohka ("cherry blossom") was a purpose-built kamikaze aircraft employed by Japan towards the end of World War II. US servicemen gave the aircraft the Japanese name Baka ("fool") out of spite.

    It was a small flying bomb that was carried underneath a bomber to within range of its target; on release, the pilot would fire the Ohka's engine and begin his dive towards the target.

    The first operational Ohkas (Type 11 and Type 21) were powered by solid fuel rocket motors, which provided great speed but only very limited range. This was problematic as it required the carrier aircraft to approach close to the target, making them very vulnerable to fighter defences.

    The Ohka Type 22 was designed to overcome this problem by using a thermojet style jet engine, the Tsu-11. This engine was successfully tested, and Ohkas were built to accept this engine, but none appear to have been used operationally.

    The final stage in Ohka development was the Type 43, which was intended to be powered by an Ne-20 turbojet. Two trainer versions were also under development for this version, the K-1 and the K-1 Kai, the former being a glider, and the latter fitted with a single rocket motor.

    Some 850 were built, mostly Type 11.
    Share this post

  3. #3
    Badsight.'s Avatar Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,437
    need more

    lots of typical japanese style paint-jobs you could copy onto this small bird

    would be great : )

    (& TY for this one btw)
    Share this post

  4. #4
    hotspace's Avatar Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Bournemouth, UK
    Posts
    3,565
    Sea Norris go and have some sex and relax. You're making to many skins per day

    Hot Space
    Share this post