1. #1
    I've been having problems with torps set to magnetic pistols detonating about halfway to target, no matter what the range. Current patrol is early to mid-1941. I would think it was "defective" model except that some have done it when distance to target was 850m. Is it a torp model or a bug?
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  2. #2
    I've been having problems with torps set to magnetic pistols detonating about halfway to target, no matter what the range. Current patrol is early to mid-1941. I would think it was "defective" model except that some have done it when distance to target was 850m. Is it a torp model or a bug?
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  3. #3
    Thats historical accuracy for you.

    While the Germans did a much better job than the US in addressing their early pistol problems, no one on either side ever fully ironed out the magnetic pistols.
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  4. #4
    Had 7 of 8 blow up..frustrating to say the least.

    Maverick
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  5. #5
    DarkOmen13's Avatar Member
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    Are you using them in bad weather? If you're going to use them you really want to do it in calm seas, rough increases the chance they go off prematurely.

    D.
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  6. #6
    Pretty nice day actually: sunny but a little hazy. However, the water was pretty choppy. Wind was about 11.
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  7. #7
    Kaleun1961's Avatar Senior Member
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    I've always wondered if the game is modelling this sort of behaviour realistically. When you think about it logically, it doesn't seem right that rough surface conditions should effect a torpedo running at depth. The way I see it, a torpedo propelling itself underwater experiences a constant "pressure" on the nose where the detonator is located. It shouldn't go off simply from that. I'm no expert, but I don't know why a torpedo underwater should be influenced by what the wind is doing to the top of the water column. I could see a torpedo set very shallow going awry from bouncing in and out of the waves, but not one running, say, 8 metres deep.

    In game, I avoid using magnetic pistols unless the range is very close or the sea is fairly calm. Because a target ship pitches vertically up and down a fair number of feet in rough waves, I would rather use an impact pistol set at a shallow depth. I find it frustrating to see a ship "jump up" just at the moment my torpedo arrives and it passes under too deeply to set off the magnetic pistol. The calmer the seas, the deeper I set my running depth, taking into account, of course, not to set it too deep and have it bounce off the rounded hull/keel section.

    Knowing the correct running depth or the appropriate pistol to use under varying circumstances is part of the Kaleun's art. I prefer nice side-on shots with impact pistols, but sometimes I choose a magnetic pistol, such as when taking a shot from an angle that would otherwise result in a ricochet. Same thing with choosing a steam or an electric torpedo. Time of day, visibility, etc. affect my choice of fish.
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  8. #8
    My understanding of it is the following...

    Waves make water molecules move in circles. We start at the surface, them move parallel to the surface, with the wind, then the molecule goes down, makes a loop and comes back to the surface.

    The depth of this disturbance is usually 1/2 of the wavelength (distance between two crests). If the torpedo is within that zone, it will move up and down due to the water motion. Maybe that movement is what sets off the magnetic detonator...

    I haven't a clue on how the piece worked, so if someone enlightens us, I will be grateful!
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  9. #9
    Kaleun1961's Avatar Senior Member
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    That makes some kind of sense to me. Looks like your university tuition is paying off.
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