1. #1
    how to make em scraped weathered and dirty
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  2. #2
    how to make em scraped weathered and dirty
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  3. #3
    This is a good and legit question that ASF came to me with via PM. I suggested he posted his question publicly in order to get more visibility.

    Now, I suck at weathering, but, there are certain things that I learned to do and experimented with, that I took from Vagabond's photoshop tutorials.

    First thing, when dirtying an aircraft, always think in terms of airflow. Dirt will accumulate and will be dispersed by wind.

    One thing you can do is take a brush like the galaxy brush in gimp and just start painting over top the wings and fuselage, very sparsely. Use a dark brownish colour. Then to get an airflowed effect, go in Filters, Blur and motion blur, turn preview on, and then fiddle with the length and angle of the blur to get the desired result. Only do this on the leading edges of the wings, and where you know dirt is likely to acumulate and be brushed away by airflow.

    Then on you layers window, play with the opacity until you reduce the effect until it only becomes subtle.

    That is the technique I use as far as "Dirty". These techniques were taken from Vagabond's weathering tutorial and transposed into gimp in a fairly simple manner. You just have to experiment with things until you get what you are looking for.
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  4. #4
    That's a good starting answer to a difficult question.

    Some techniques I use are to use the airbrush and smudge tools (with varying sizes of fuzzy brush) to make things like exhaust or gunsmoke stains.

    Oil stains can be don several ways, you can hand-paint them or do what I do: paint a few "oil spots" and then use the wind filter (Filter, Distorts, Wind) to make it look , well, windswept. Note that this filter only works left-right or right-left, so for vertical stains you'll need to rotate the layer.

    One very quick and effective method of giving your skin a "used" look is to add what I call a garbage layer. This can be something as simple as a random layer completely covered with black-gray-white pixels or a (mostly desaturated) photo of dead leaves, dried up mud or something. In either case, be sure to set the opacity very low so it doesn't overwhelm the skin.

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  5. #5
    willyvic's Avatar Moderator
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by jarink:

    ...One very quick and effective method of giving your skin a "used" look is to add what I call a garbage layer... dried up mud or something... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Great idea. Off to google some mud.

    WV
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  6. #6
    When you understand the GIMP tools described here http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/forums/forum35-gimp/

    Then you should be able to translate Photoshop tutorials, like the ones by Vagabond and the one below to the GIMP

    http://www.simmerspaintshop.com/foru...eathering.html
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  7. #7
    stansdds's Avatar Senior Member
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    I use GIMP exclusively (it's free and I'm a cheap bastige). Always start with a new layer when adding weathering, if you screw it up, it's no big deal. For something like paint fade, I make entire layers that are off-white and are only 3 to 5% opacity. This seems to work rather well in giving paint a faded look. I'll do the same for a dust layer. I can then modify those layers, adding to or erasing some of the layer to achieve my desired effect.

    I use small Galaxy or a fuzzy circle brush or air brush to add areas of chipped paint. The circle or fuzzy circle air brush at about 50% opacity works well for me when adding exhaust and oil stains, to fade them and really streak them I'll use the smudge tool.

    There really is an art to making convincing weathering.

    Here is one I recently made, an F4U-1A that would look correct for late 1944 missions.

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  8. #8
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stansdds:
    I use GIMP exclusively (it's free and I'm a cheap bastige). </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Nice to know I'm not the only one!

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stansdds:
    I use small Galaxy or a fuzzy circle brush or air brush to add areas of chipped paint. The circle or fuzzy circle air brush at about 50% opacity works well for me when adding exhaust and oil stains </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I forgot to mention, you can make your own brushes to use with GIMP. I'd explain it, but there's a very good how-to page here. I mainly use some custom brushes I made for doing paint chipping.
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  9. #9

    gimp guide is useful

    thank you , your gimp guide is useful .

    Gimp has pretty much all the features Photoshop does. The challenge is becoming comfortable with using Gimp, especially if you are already used to Photoshop.

    it's quite functional and while I'm a novice, I'm quite proud of some of the stuff I've been able to output. I use it with my XP-Pen Star 06 Digital PaintingTablet for both photo editing as well as art.
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