1. #1
    Hi, Im a complete n00b when it comes to wwii combat flight sims but I was wondering, if you have an opponent on your tail, should you put your plane into a flat spin to avoid getting shot down or will you tall too fast and risk destroying the plane by doing so?

    Because thats pretty much what I was doing when I was combat flight simming, I would pull up on the stick hard and my plane would spin out, usually I could get out of it, sometimes not though.
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  2. #2
    You shouldn't put your plane into a flat spin PERIOD! If you do, your pursuer can gain more energy and shoot you down with ease.

    However, stalling out your plane briefly for a quick reduction of speed is effective but difficult to pull off.
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  3. #3
    TinyTim's Avatar Banned
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    Anything but flatspin!

    Let's assume you did everything you could to prevent the enemy glue to your tail, but he did anyway.

    Firstly, knowing capabilities of your and enemy planes is imperative. Do something he can't follow - you can nearly always found such a characteristic. If you are in a better diving plane, dive. If you are a better turner, turn. Many times flat or rolling scissors do the trick.

    Secondly, if there is no other way out, run into a cloud, or try to drag the enemy so that he becomes a target for your teammates. This will either scare him off or hopefully get him killed before he kills you. If none of your friends are around, try to drag him towards friendly AAA.

    But for a self preservation instinct's sake, don't get into a flatspin on purpose. Firstly, as Col.BBQ said, you dump a lot of energy and put yourself into even more inferior position than you already are in. Secondly, for a skilled pilot a flat spinning aircraft presents a sitting duck.
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  4. #4
    Ya go ahead..
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  5. #5
    DIRTY-MAC's Avatar Senior Member
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    No.
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  6. #6
    If your enemy doesn't kill you the ground will. But give it a try and let us know how it works out for you.
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  7. #7
    You mean where you start spinning downwards like a pizza? I find it's very hard to get out of those even with planes that don't stall easily, and if I'm close to the ground I'm a goner.

    Doing a high speed stall is a lot easier to get out of--a lot of planes like the Spitfire and Fw-190 will flip to the right when you pull back hard on the stick. You lose some speed though.

    I play offline and if I have an enemy on my tail I try to outrun him, outturn him, or get my wingman to shake him off. I never use stalls.
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  8. #8
    danjama's Avatar Senior Member
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    yea sure the best plane to try this in is the p39
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  9. #9
    WTE_Galway's Avatar Senior Member
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    Two comments ....


    1. The spin you commonly get into in IL2 is generally NOT a flat spin its just a spin. Flat spins are rare and difficult to get out of. Normal spin recovery doesn't always work in a flat spin.

    2. There is a historical precedent to the technique. Marseilles apparently used it when attacking allied Luftbury circles, coming up under his target, deflection shooting and then deliberately spinning out before the next plane in the circle could get a shot at him. Of course there was no chance of pursuit as the attacker would not break the circle.
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  10. #10
    yes..stall spins work to slow you down and generally make it difficult to hit you if you are twirling around. Its a last ditch effort, but not recommended if you have other alternatives.

    Its best to practice entry and recovery techniques with a plane you have in mind.

    If your not spinning on purpose then at least you'll have the knack for recovering fast.

    Typical recovery procedure:

    - full opposite rudder

    - Neutral Elevators

    - and in some planes it requires a little aileron finesse.
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