1. #11
    SoulFire382's Avatar Banned
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    Wow.. This has been really helpful for me, too. I've been trying to burn off maybe 10, maybe 15 pounds that suspiciously built up right after school started. Coincidence? I most certianly think not!
    The problem is, I only get gym one trimester a year. And my favorite sport/exercise to do is Skiing, and that's kind of restricted unless I hop contenents once a month... I've been trying to cut calories, as well. Soda, I knew ye well. Anyways... I'm different from Tfrogs, as I am NOT a vegetarian. I can't join any gyms, although now that snow around here is melted I can jog daily (Which I'm doing) and I have an angled sit-up bench like Tfrogs does, as well as a large assortment of dumbbells. Any suggestions?
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  2. #12
    Pitt Bull's Avatar Senior Member
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    I say don't use the weights and start doing Pullups, Pushups and Situps.. The Pull up is probably the exercise that makes you the strongest and builds up muscles.. I also think that they won't harm your growth
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  3. #13
    for weight training its important to give your muscles rest and in the same philosophy as what Geist said::

    Do a big muscle group and then a smaller group. Rest a day...then do a different group, and a smaller group. When using freeweights for larger muscle groups your also using a lot of the smaller muscles in tandem with the larger muscles. So it is important to break things up.

    my routine was this:
    Monday: Chest and Shoulders
    Wednesday: Back and Arms
    Friday: Legs and Abs.


    Really, save the exhaustive routines like Pyramids (lifting till you cant lift your arms anymore) for several months down the road when the body is aleady well trained and used to the excersise, after that it is good to break your routine up. I was doing this at 17 and never did anything that was a bad pain...believe it or not curls was the only thing that hurt in a bad way so I avoided those.

    At 15 it is not healthy to do to much of powerlifting so be careful....and if you do it with responsibly you will get good results.

    I remember when I started, benching 135 was a struggle and 6 months later I could do 250 and squat 300+. I remember on a bad day during football practice, the team doing 100 pushups in addition to the regular excersises....not easy.

    Another tip, light weights with a lot of repetitions (4 sets of 20+) will give you definition without straining yourself. Heavy weights with fewer repetitions (4 sets of 10) are going build muscle mass. The correct weight that you should work with is you should always be able to finish the last repetition with difficulty. Every couple of weeks you will find you can raise the weight 10 lbs.
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  4. #14
    NJCL43's Avatar Banned
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    no need for anything at your age as your metabolism is like a bakers oven,start running,you will be a twig end of the year
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  5. #15
    Spekkio9's Avatar Banned
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    - About 5 or 6 weeks ago I joined my local gym (seems I don't have to be 16+), and I had a personal trainer type guy give me a personalised program, which consists of two days a week of running (20 minutes speed intervals on the treadmill)/rowing machine (best time 2km), and two days of weights (nothing too heavy though... 3 sets of 15 reps per visit for: benchpress machine (the non-dangerous type), bicep curls, lat pulldowns, upright rows, situps, shoulder presses, leg presses, leg extensions, dips and chinups. By the time I get around to the dips and chinups though, I never have the strength to do them... so I tried doing them at the start, but then I don't have any strength for anything else...).
    Ok, 15 is a little young to be doing the weights. I know you're doing light stuff, but I think you'd benefit more by focusing more on cardio and pushups, pullups, and dips to naturally build your strength.

    It sounds like your personal trainer put you on more of a circuit training type program by the statement of 'by the time I get to dips I can't do it.' Circuit training isn't bad, but you don't do three sets of each exercise before moving on...you have to do one of each. You'd have to be in one hell of a shape to do all that and still have strength left over at the end. If you keep your current weight training workout, you have to find a way to divide the exercises into a 3 or 4 day routine. This is what goodkebab was saying with his post. This will give your muscles the chance to properly rest and rebuild themselves. REST IS IMPORTANT! Kebab's routine schedule is just fine, although I do chest/triceps and back/biceps, then shoulder/legs on the same day. I've heard numerous people say doing shoulders in conjunction with chest isn't good. So day one you can do: benchpress machine, maybe an incline benchpress machine, tricep pulldowns with the cables, and dips. Day two you can do the chinups/widebar pullups (which are VERY hard), lat pulldown, uptight rows, bicep curls. Day 3 you can do shoulder press, leg extention, leg curls. I work out 3 days, take a day off, and repeat, but if you don't have that sort of time working out on mon/wed/fri or tues/thurs/sat would be just fine. If you'd like some more exercises (pretty sure it's recommended you do 9-16 sets per muscle group), just say so and I'll find a site for them.

    On EVERY day you work out, do 20 min of cardio on a bicycle or elliptical machine before you lift, and ab exercises at the end...situps, crunches (which is what I call when you lift your head and legs 12 cm off the ground and contract and extend), leg lifts, etc. 6 pack abs come from being lean as well as having ab muscles.

    That will allow you to properly do the exercises. You can even add in more exercises per mucle group as you get into better shape, but again you can't go too crazy until you're done growing (usually between 16-18 years old).

    Add another day or two to your cardio routine after you've done it for a while. The whole thing with working out is if you're not pushing yourself more, you're doing less for your body. That doesn't mean to over-exert yourself, but you should try to slightly increase whatever it is you do every couple of weeks or so. You have to bring your body up to a new level, or else it will never get there.

    I'm already seeing a big improvement in the muscle mass in my arms (right arm moreso than left arm... that can't be good...), but I feel that 90 situps a week isn't going to get me anywhere near a six-pack. I do the situps on an angled situp thing, and I go sorta half up, half down (the trainer guy said I should do it this way)... I think this way, I can't absentmindedly use my legs for lifting myself, I have to use my stomach muscles.
    Well, if you follow what I said earlier it'll take care of the ab part. You're right, you're gonna have to start doing more than 90 situps a week, but only when you can handle it. Start by doing 4 sets of 20 situps during each workout. As your abs get used to that, add in some more exercises...leg lifts for lower abs, oblique crunches, etc. Once you get used to that, you can start increasing the amount of reps you do per set. Once you start getting used to that, you'll be able to do situps almost every day.

    As for the arms part, it is imperitive when you workout to keep proper form. If you are lifting a barbell, lift it evenly with the same weight on both sides. If you are doing dumbells, do the same reps with the same weight on both arms. Do your weaker arm first so you don't do more with your stronger arm and create more of an imbalance. Eventually you will even out.

    If you drink the water consistently, your body will adjust. Keep count of how much you drink for a couple of days just to be sure you get the actual 8 glasses. Cut out caffeine, and you won't pee so much.

    Ok, since you're a vegitarian, the protein shake is good, because that's one thing you'll lack. Also, since you're only 15, you should stick with 2% milk, if not whole milk. Your body is still developing and you still need the dairy. I made the assumption you were older, which was obviously a poor assumption on my part. If you're not opposed to eating fish, tuna sandwiches with a some light mayo go a long way...5 g of fat, and tons of protein. Ditch the fried fish.
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  6. #16
    Spekkio9's Avatar Banned
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    On a sidenote 1. Yeah, 6' 190 lbs isn't overweight. You just need to shape up.

    2. Kebab, my friend I work out with has been lifting for 2 years. I've been happy with my progress in the 2 months I've been doing it, but he's hit a plateau. Basically, our routine looks like this:

    We do all exercises with 4 sets of 10, 8, 6, and 4 reps followed by a dropset.

    Day 1
    Chest:
    One week: barbell benchpress, incline press, and decline press. Flies
    Other week: dumbell biangle benchpress, dumbell bi-angle incline press, barbell decline, flies.

    Triceps:
    We do 3-4 exercises depending on time, and a mix of skull crushes, pulldowns with both bar and rope, the weight machine that simulates the same motion as dips, actual dips, and dumbell over the head.

    Day 2
    Back: pretty much randomly pick 4 exercises out of: row, lat pulldown both wide and narrow grip, widebar pullups, that freeweight thing where you lean over and pull up the bar, dumbell rows, and a motion that is reverse of crunches holding a plate

    Biceps: Pick 4 of: widebar curls, preacher curls, concentration curls, hammer curls, cables, twist curls, 21's.

    Day 3:
    Shoulders: Alternate weeks between barbell and dumbell shoulder press. He likes to do a bi-angular press using the machine after that, although I don't because it's the same exercise. We also pick 3 randomly from: front dumbell lifts, shrugs, cables, and what I call a 'chicken wing' exercise...I think it's called lateral shoulder lifts or something.

    Legs: squats, leg extentions, calf extentions. I don't like doing leg curls because I feel they kill my flexibility.

    Rest a day, wash, rinse, repeat.
    --------------------------------------------

    Even though we don't have a set "plan" of doing exercises, we try to mix it up as much as possible. I think we do a good job of mixing up our exercises and not repeating everything from one week to the next, and of mixing up the order we do the exercises, although I'm sure there are more exercises we could work in. Anyway, any suggestions I can pass on so he can stop *****ing he can't get past benching 205?

    I think one of his problems is he uses too little weight on the first set. He'll put a plate on for benchpress for the first set, then go to a plate and a quarter. I told him to start out with a plate and 15 and go from there. He does that for a lot of exercises. Although he could be right about it and I could be going about it the wrong way, as I try to start with a weight where I can increase the weight by 10-20 pounds for two-arm exercises and 5-10 pounds for one-arm exercises.
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  7. #17
    Da_shoota's Avatar Senior Member
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    Sorry to stray away from the topic but while we're on the subject of fitness:

    I just started bodybuilding and I need a protein shake and someone interested me in Muscle Milk. I haven't bought it yet but I would like to know how is this shake? Is it good for beginners like me??
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  8. #18
    Spekkio9's Avatar Banned
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    Wouldn't know much about actual body building. I lift to A) get stronger and B) to look better. I don't want to be like ahnold. You'd probably have to talk to someone who's a body builder and see what to do, especially since you're just starting out.
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  9. #19
    Da_shoota's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by Spekkio9:
    Wouldn't know much about actual body building. I lift to A) get stronger and B) to look better. I don't want to be like ahnold. You'd probably have to talk to someone who's a body builder and see what to do, especially since you're just starting out.
    I thought body building was to get stronger and look better Anyways, I'll ask around on a fitness forum. I PM Mac about the same question but he hasn't responded.
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  10. #20
    Spekkio9's Avatar Banned
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    Well, what do you mean by body-building? Do you mean you want to enter competitions, or do you mean you just want to get more fit?

    If you're just weight lifting to be more fit, the muscle milk will only help if you already don't get enough protein. If you live in America with our meat and dairy-heavy diets, you most likely won't need the muscle milk. If you're a vegetarian or eat very little meat, then yeah it's a good thing to drink. One of my other friends drinks that stuff. Tastes (and smells) better than the protein shake my workout buddy buys, but still a waste of money if you're already eating 1 gram of protein per kg (2.2 lbs) of weight.

    If you're looking to body build and look like ahnold, you're gonna need much more than muscle milk, and I can't help you with that stuff.
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