1. #1
    MB_Avro_UK's Avatar Senior Member
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    hi all,

    I am not a historian but I have an interest in history.

    As far as I understand,the American War of Independence was sparked by the British demand for higher taxes.

    The taxes were raised as I understand to fight the French and a couple of other European nations who wanted their Imperial 'slice' of the British 'American colonies'.

    If the 'American Colony' had ACCEPTED this tax and a revolution had not taken place how would world history have changed assuming that America had remained a British Colony?

    I may be 'off the wall' here but to me this subject is of interest and worthy of a few moments thought.



    Best Regards,
    MB_Avro.
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  2. #2
    Bearcat99's Avatar Senior Member
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    The break with Britain was inevitable. If not the Stamp Act or the Tea Tax there would have been something else.. the issue of slavery that almost tore the country apart would have most likely been a possible cause...... Not to mention that at the time Europe was carving up the continent like a turkey... that too awas a part of the equation.....
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  3. #3
    I can't see America staying a colony under the British. The colonists were very independant and didn't really share the same identity as the home country. If it wasn't taxation without representation, it would have been some other gripe....say maybe slavery.

    EDIT; Bearcat you read my mind, and you are a faster typer You beat me by 5 seconds.
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  4. #4
    au contrare, something like 75% of the colonists wanted to remain under the british crown, and another sizable portion didnt care either way
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  5. #5
    horseback's Avatar Senior Member
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    The Mustang would STILL have won the war!

    Always wanted to be the first to say that in a thread.

    Seriously, Bearcat has it right. The psychological change from 'Englishman' to 'American' had already taken place long before the British government decided that the colonies should start paying taxes. The only way that could have been avoided was to have never entered into a period of benign neglect in the first place.

    From the early 1600s until the Seven Years' War (what we call the Frech and Indian War), the Crown left the colonists pretty much alone. Telling us to pay for our defense after the poor showing of the British Army (at least where we could see it, here in what are now the States) without giving us seats in the House of Commons was a grave tactical error.

    Even had we been given seats in Parliament, as I said, the psychological change was already made, and the dye was cast. 1776 or later, a break became ineveitable by the time Charles II was invited back.

    cheers

    horseback
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  6. #6
    During the English Civil war (1640's), amongst the most fervent and effective religious preachers for the Parliamentarians were American colonists who made the trip over to spread their revolutionary zeal. I think from this you can sense the seeds of dissent had been sown in the colonies, or amongst certain groups of colonists anyway.
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  7. #7
    Chuck_Older's Avatar Banned
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    I grew up in Boston. I live there now. One of the last remaining bright spots of life in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (did you know that technically, there are only 48 States? Virginia and Massachusetts are Commonwealths) is the History. I can go to a Museum tomorrow, about 5 miles from the keyboard I'm tapping on, and see some of Paul Revere's silver work. I can visit Lexington and Concord anythime I like, and I can tell you what happened at Breed's Hill. Actually, my Father has in his possesion a relic of that 'battle'- a powder horn with a sketch of the fight scratched on it, made by a Colonial participant

    Bearcat and horseback have pretty good insights on this. I'd like to add though:

    Some of our Founding Fathers were quite opportunistic. There was a reason some of them left England.

    Take John Hancock for example. Hancock was all but a Tory until it became clear he couldn't continue to bribe English authorities to look the other way when his shady shipments came in. So- Down with the King's rule in the Colonies!

    Really, many of the guys in organizations like the Sons of Liberty were just rabble rousers. 'No Taxation without Representation' was a convenient, if nontheless accurate, chord to strike for men like Hancock who saw opportunity show it's face.

    In my opinion, the break with England would have come later if it hadn't happened sooner. As stated above, the regard the Colonists received for defense was less than ideal, and the ever-present threat of War with France would likely have come to fruition again. I can easily see England clamping down hard on it's American colony in support of that war for both resources and sailors, and the colonists would have considered themselves very ill-used by basically a foreign despot making them fight his battles.
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  8. #8
    AKA_TAGERT's Avatar Banned
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    Basically it would be very much like it is today, except that we would have bad teeth too
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  9. #9
    And warm beer
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  10. #10
    Chuck_Older's Avatar Banned
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    Not so! I refuse to say "shed-yule"
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