1. #1
    anyone else have problem taking off the brewster?
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  2. #2
    1) line up with runway (check heading indicator) 050
    2) Maintain 050 using rudder since you cant see over the nose and runways are not well seen
    3) Begin to pitch forward gently to put the nose down and raise the tail. This provides FWD vis. Speed approx are - 80kmh-140kmh. I push forward around 50.
    4)Use 60% power until reaching 60kmh, then 80% power at 80kmh, then 110% power at 140kmh.

    Rotate (pull back) at 180kmh approx. Loadouts do affect speeds. Heavier add speed, lighter take some out.
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  3. #3
    Seems like you're having problems with take off in general. Basically practise makes perfect. The Brester is one of the easiest and most forgiving aircraft to take off, it has a strong undercarraige
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  4. #4
    Treetop64's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by general_kalle:
    anyone else have problem taking off the brewster?
    Um...no. What, specifically, are the problems you're having?
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  5. #5
    Tully__'s Avatar Global Moderator
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    The Brewster does have a nasty habit (similar to I-153 and I-16) of "dropping" a wing when the tail comes up and again when the gear comes clear of the ground. The advise to raise the tail early helps with the first, for the second use opposite rudder to correct rather than aileron and you'll find it much easier to control the loose wing. More speed before pull up helps if you have the runway space.

    For ALL aicraft proper rudder control on the takeoff run makes life a lot easier, practice rudder use and you'll find you have less problems.
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  6. #6
    For ALL aicraft proper rudder control on the takeoff run makes life a lot easier, practice rudder use and you'll find you have less problems.
    I politely disagree. If you have tailwheel lock on your aircraft, THAT makes life a lot easier than struggling with the rudder.
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  7. #7
    ïm NOT having problems to take off i general... not at all and i can handle the brewster. i was just wondering why it is so difficult. It might have strong undercarrige, but theres another thing. It has a very strong turque anyway it turns off the runway and tends to roll to the side(dont remember which but it has something to do with the torque) which makes it very hard to keep on the runway. im not having problems with other planes
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  8. #8
    Tully__'s Avatar Global Moderator
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    Originally posted by rnzoli:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">For ALL aicraft proper rudder control on the takeoff run makes life a lot easier, practice rudder use and you'll find you have less problems.
    I politely disagree. If you have tailwheel lock on your aircraft, THAT makes life a lot easier than struggling with the rudder. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
    Only until you have the tail come up at 50-90km/h, then you're back to rudder
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  9. #9
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    The real Buffalo had an undercarriage prone to collapse which made it a poor carrier fighter. If it, indeed, has a strong undercarriage in this sim, somebody boobed. See THE FIRST TEAM, Lundstrom, on the Buffalo.
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  10. #10
    Strong or not, the undercarriage is narrow. Add the torque and liberal use of the throttle while starting to roll and you'll quickly have your hands full.

    I recommend lining up, throttle to about 50% all the while applying necessary rudder to stay on the line and wait for a second or two after your tail lifts. Apply more throttle and gently (hamfists beware!) pull back on the stick. I also recommend the use of flaps in most take off situations.

    The Brewster can be touchy and is usually an easy kill unless at altitude, clean and at least at cruise speed.

    TB
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