1. #1
    The Temora Aviation Museum is excited to announce that a second airworthy
    Spitfire will be incorporated into its collection in June 2006.

    The Temora Aviation Museum, located in southwest New South Wales currently
    operates the only airworthy Spitfire in Australia, along with a historical
    collection of ex-military aircraft including a Lockheed Hudson, Wirraway, Tiger
    Moth, Meteor, Canberra, and Vampire. Regular Flying Days are held during which
    the Museum displays its collection in the skies above Temora. The addition of
    this Spitfire will give Museum visitors the unique opportunity to see two
    Spitfires in the sky together in Australia.

    This Supermarine Mk XVI Spitfire TB863 is an ex-wartime example, built at
    Vickers Armstrong's Castle Bromwich "shadow factory", near Birmingham, in late
    1944. The aircraft is currently located in New Zealand and will be shipped to
    Temora after the Warbirds over Wanaka airshow.

    TB863 is powered by a Rolls Royce Packard Merlin and was one of the last built
    with the standard fuselage design. The aircraft was test flown from Castle
    Bromwich and subsequently delivered to No. 19 Maintenance Unit at RAF St Athan
    on 27 February 1945. It was issued to No. 453 Squadron Royal Australian Air
    Force (one of a number of empire units serving with the RAF) based at Matlask,
    Norfolk on 22 March as a replacement for a Spitfire which forced landed in
    Holland

    Spitfire TB863€s restoration was completed in 1988 by The Fighter Collection
    at Duxford UK and since then has taken pride of place in Sir Tim Wallis€s
    Alpine Fighter Collection at Wanaka in New Zealand. The Spitfire is currently
    painted in a World War II paint scheme and wears the same markings as when it
    served with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) over the skies of Europe.

    Temora Aviation Museum President and Founder Mr. David Lowy, AM stated €œWe are
    very proud to bring to Australia an important piece of our military aviation
    heritage. The aircraft is in excellent condition and is a testament to the
    dedication and work that Sir Tim Wallis and his team invested over the years. We
    look forward to displaying both of our Spitfire€s for many years to come€.

    Sir Tim stated that €œWe are delighted that TB863 is going to Temora,
    Australia. With its€ Australian Squadron history it will be a wonderful
    heritage item for them to add to their collection. I hope to be at Temora for
    one of it€s first flights and to meet with David and his people€.

    Check out the links for pictures of our newest acquisition.
    http://aviationmuseum.ayera.com/news/spitfiretb.cfm
    http://www.nzfpm.co.nz/aircraft/mkxvi.htm



    http://www.aviationmuseum.com.au/
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  2. #2
    The Temora Aviation Museum is excited to announce that a second airworthy
    Spitfire will be incorporated into its collection in June 2006.

    The Temora Aviation Museum, located in southwest New South Wales currently
    operates the only airworthy Spitfire in Australia, along with a historical
    collection of ex-military aircraft including a Lockheed Hudson, Wirraway, Tiger
    Moth, Meteor, Canberra, and Vampire. Regular Flying Days are held during which
    the Museum displays its collection in the skies above Temora. The addition of
    this Spitfire will give Museum visitors the unique opportunity to see two
    Spitfires in the sky together in Australia.

    This Supermarine Mk XVI Spitfire TB863 is an ex-wartime example, built at
    Vickers Armstrong's Castle Bromwich "shadow factory", near Birmingham, in late
    1944. The aircraft is currently located in New Zealand and will be shipped to
    Temora after the Warbirds over Wanaka airshow.

    TB863 is powered by a Rolls Royce Packard Merlin and was one of the last built
    with the standard fuselage design. The aircraft was test flown from Castle
    Bromwich and subsequently delivered to No. 19 Maintenance Unit at RAF St Athan
    on 27 February 1945. It was issued to No. 453 Squadron Royal Australian Air
    Force (one of a number of empire units serving with the RAF) based at Matlask,
    Norfolk on 22 March as a replacement for a Spitfire which forced landed in
    Holland

    Spitfire TB863€s restoration was completed in 1988 by The Fighter Collection
    at Duxford UK and since then has taken pride of place in Sir Tim Wallis€s
    Alpine Fighter Collection at Wanaka in New Zealand. The Spitfire is currently
    painted in a World War II paint scheme and wears the same markings as when it
    served with the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) over the skies of Europe.

    Temora Aviation Museum President and Founder Mr. David Lowy, AM stated €œWe are
    very proud to bring to Australia an important piece of our military aviation
    heritage. The aircraft is in excellent condition and is a testament to the
    dedication and work that Sir Tim Wallis and his team invested over the years. We
    look forward to displaying both of our Spitfire€s for many years to come€.

    Sir Tim stated that €œWe are delighted that TB863 is going to Temora,
    Australia. With its€ Australian Squadron history it will be a wonderful
    heritage item for them to add to their collection. I hope to be at Temora for
    one of it€s first flights and to meet with David and his people€.

    Check out the links for pictures of our newest acquisition.
    http://aviationmuseum.ayera.com/news/spitfiretb.cfm
    http://www.nzfpm.co.nz/aircraft/mkxvi.htm



    http://www.aviationmuseum.com.au/
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  3. #3
    You can never have too many Spitfires.
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  4. #4
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  5. #5
    Yeah, there was a picture in today's newspaper. Very nice. Sadly, Australia is just as guilty of trashing precious WW2 hardware as other countries. Plenty of Australian-built Mossies, for instance, ended up rotting away...
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  6. #6
    Yep. I recently read in the papers, that an American carrier was dumping aircraft off the Queensland coast. Not sure wether it was modern or WW2 era. Makes you shake your head sometimes.
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