1. #1
    In our beloved (?) object viewer it states something about the MiG-3U like 'it was a very good machine, the prototypes operated at the front for a long time without loss', but not put into production because there was no need for them. Or something like that.

    From "Soviet Air Force Fighter Colors 1941 - 1945":

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> Testing at the NII VVS during July 1943 was conducted under the designation MiG-3U (It was known a I-230 before). The MiG-3U attained 526km/h at sea level and 656km/h at 7000m, but requiring fully 6.2 minutes to reach 5000m. Handling of the 3U was poor, and all of the old instabilities of the MiG-3 programme accompanied the prototype. The types landing behavour was particulary alarming, and spinning trails could not be succesfully completed. The NII VVS did not pass the MiG-3U for it's state evaluation trails.

    Nevertheless, Zavod 155 completed six prototypes, largely on own initative. These were subsequently rejected by NKAP, but Mikoyan used his political influence to have four of them dispatched to 12GIAP around Moscow for "service trails".
    The pilots of 12GIAP operated these MiG-3Us for several months, but with a notable lack of succcess, and they were returned to Zavod 155 after 2 of the machines were wrecked in landing mishaps. No further development of the MiG-3 was undertaken.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    NOTES:
    Zavod = state aviation factory
    NII VVS = VVS scientific testing and acceptance facility
    NKAP = state institute for Aviation

    Jeroen
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  2. #2
    It could be a diffrent version. They made dozens of MiG-3 improved versions.
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  3. #3
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Platypus_1.JaVA:
    It could be a diffrent version. They made dozens of MiG-3 improved versions. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    These were all based on the I-200 prototype and still called MiG-3, long/short nose, with or without slats...

    Also note the date of July 1943, all MiG-3 production was halted in late 1941/early 1942.

    Jeroen
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  4. #4
    robban75's Avatar Senior Member
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    Interesting! Thanks Jeroen!
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  5. #5
    LEXX_Luthor's Avatar Senior Member
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    Actually, it had stunning strategic success over Moscow.
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The D aircrafts of 12 GvIAP reached some limited success, for example, during 1942/43 German high-altitude reconnaissance planes Ju-86 sometimes flew safely over Moscow, at the altitude of 13 km where they were unreachable for fighters or AA fire. Once two pilots from 12 GIAP, Edik Nalivaiko with an high-altitude Yak-9D and Lionia Samohvalov with a Mig-3U, succeeded to get 1 km close to a Ju-86, without reaching it. Nevertheless, after that, such flights over Moscow were stopped.

    All D aircrafts were retired by service after some months, due to the already mentioned problems, particularly to the difficulties while landing, that led to wreck two aircrafts.

    ~ http://mig3.sovietwarplanes.com/mig3/I-230.html
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    High altitude Ki~44 was equally hated by Japanese Army pilots for the same flying reasons as Russian pilots didn't like MiG, until USAAF fielded something high altitude over Japan that made Ki~44 very popular with Japanese Army pilots.

    Other than the decreasing threat posed by Ju~86 recon, there was nothing the Luftwaffe could field that required a high altitude interceptor (not dogfighter) to respond with, which explains the severe lack of engine support for MiG~3U development.

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The acrobatic performances of the D-01 were good, but the landing remained difficult; the cockpit was more comfortable and similar to other up-to-date fighters. Some vibrations were noted on the tail horizontal surfaces.

    The most evident defect was the oil leakage through the coupling of the reductor shaft, especially at high altitude. After every flight, the aircraft returned with the fuselage sprayed by oil from the nose up to the tail. This defect was considered unacceptable by test pilots, but it was probably due to the hybrid engine. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
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  6. #6
    didnt the pilots using the 6 Mig-3U that seen service (till their spares ran out) rack up 60 victorys ?

    .

    jeroen_R90S , did you find out which model Yak you posted about in the La-9 thread was ?

    you mentioned the Yak-3U & posted a pic of the Yak-3 with the Radial motor set-up

    also did you manage to track down any Grumman F8F Bearcat data of your own ?
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  7. #7
    After reading LEXX_Luther's link...

    http://mig3.sovietwarplanes.com/mig3/I-230.html

    The plane doesn't sound any more problematic than the early Corsair. And lots of planes had reputations for difficult landing.

    Sounds more like something not pursued due to lack of requirement rather than technical problems.

    Interesting material - thanks.

    -Bill
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  8. #8
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LEXX_Luthor:
    Actually, it had stunning strategic success over Moscow. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Lets not exaggerate this into a "STUNNING STRATEGIC SUCCESS".

    Like any experimental a/c (or pre-production) this crate had enough teething troubles. Now the question one should ask is if the burd in our game has any real reficiencies reflecting the experimental state of many of its part - most important the engine.

    I see this same failure in the I-185, although Comrade Oleg promised an a/c that would at least in some ways reflect its preproduction status, the so released a/c can be abused (especially its engine) to your hart's content. The same goes for the I-230.

    Perhaps that's the main reason why, beside some business issues, Oleg doesn't really feel like releasing the Red Star add on in the West. It will probably create such a whole as never seen with Ta 152, Go229s and even the ever amazing Bf 109Z.

    I might not even blame him...
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  9. #9
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LEXX_Luthor:
    Actually, it had stunning strategic success over Moscow.
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>...Once two pilots from 12 GIAP, Edik Nalivaiko with an high-altitude Yak-9D and Lionia Samohvalov with a Mig-3U, succeeded to get 1 km close to a Ju-86, without reaching it. Nevertheless, after that, such flights over Moscow were stopped.
    ...
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    If there had been 2 special Yak-9Ds the result would have been the same I'm inclined to think...

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
    Other than the decreasing threat posed by Ju~86 recon, there was nothing the Luftwaffe could field that required a high altitude interceptor (not dogfighter) to respond with, which explains the severe lack of engine support for MiG~3U development.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Indeed, but if NII VVS test pilots did not approve it as being suitable for average Soviet pilot it would not have gotten a production contract in the first place. NII VVS had nothing to say over production contract, they had to test if the plane was good or not.

    If it was only half as good as it looked, it would have been an excellent plane

    Jeroen
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  10. #10
    clint-ruin's Avatar Senior Member
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    A long time ago Butch2k posted the errata list for the Bf109F from when it entered service. Made the thing sound like a disaster just waiting to kill its pilot off. Every plane has shakedown issues.

    Mig3U was given to veteran pilots as well, which no doubt helped its record. Being that there were only a few made I would assume that these were pretty much hand crafted and well attended machines by the ground crews. Even mediocre planes can shine if they're only thrown into engagements that suit them [tactical engagement choice wise, and performance envelope wise].
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