1. #1
    Share this post

  2. #2
    ... and the point?
    Share this post

  3. #3
    What the f/// they were doing in Russia with aviation fuels which had a freezing point -5 degrees celsius? Was the last sample a basic fuel which was adjusted to reazonable level by adding something to it? How the engines could work with that large amount of parafines in the fuel?
    Share this post

  4. #4
    Yes you have the facts here, no flight engine worked when it was cold. Thats how VVS got their air superiority.

    " ...We are back. And we kept silent about war for many years, remembering friends that gone only among ourselves. But keeping silence does not mean forgetting. And we have nothing to be ashamed of... "

    Who are we, what are they back to, what about the war are they keeping silent, who tells them to be ashame, and for what shall they be ashame off?
    Share this post

  5. #5
    ploughman's Avatar Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    6,503
    Why not read the whole document.

    "It appears very dobutful whether this fuel was ever used as aviation gasoline on the Eastern front (note freezing point as well as other properties). Althought the octane rating is satisfactory it is unusual for the Germans to use a fuel of such high aromatic content and specific gravity even for motor gasoline."
    Share this post

  6. #6
    Originally posted by zugfuhrer:
    Yes you have the facts here, no flight engine worked when it was cold. Thats how VVS got their air superiority.
    No. In their biography at least Hartmann and Rall describe that the limiting factor for flying at -40 degrees centigrade was the oil that was frozen hard so the engine couldn't be turned on. A captured Russian pilot showed them how to work this out though: mix some fuel in the oil and it would start normal. They just had to remove the oil sooner than normal 'cause else something adverse would happen (cant remember what now).
    They never complained about not being able to use the fuel in the extreme cold.
    Share this post

  7. #7
    luftluuver's Avatar Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    3,012
    Yellow fuel? B4 is blue and C3 is green, so what rating was the yellow?

    No one think that, just maybe, it is a typo?

    Here are some other captured test samples, http://www.fischer-tropsch.org/Tom%20Reels/Linked/A5464...0654%20Item%206A.pdf
    Share this post

  8. #8
    Originally posted by FPSOLKOR:
    What the f/// they were doing in Russia with aviation fuels which had a freezing point -5 degrees celsius? Was the last sample a basic fuel which was adjusted to reazonable level by adding something to it? How the engines could work with that large amount of parafines in the fuel?
    I don't quite get it - all the fuels you've listed are shown with -50 to -60 freezing points, except the last sample which was found in barrel on some airfield, and that fuel is of very low octane at 76.. Chances are it's not even aviation fuel, or perhaps fuel for trainers, captured fuel rotting there for years..?

    As to answer your question, I believe special additives were added to the oil, and the radiator inlets were covered with wooden planks before takeoff to allow oil to heat up.
    Share this post

  9. #9
    Sorry you must have missed the irony.
    Kurfurst is it Frank Zappa to the left on the poster "Welcome to Uberworld" in your reply?
    Share this post

  10. #10
    DKoor's Avatar Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,498
    Originally posted by zugfuhrer:
    Sorry you must have missed the irony.
    Share this post