1. #11
    horseback's Avatar Senior Member
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    Actually, you made a claim to Europe being the place where ‘democracy’ has gained the strongest hold; I would say that democracy (in any form) in Europe likely would never have existed without the American example.

    As I pointed out, there was no claim to fully living up to our ideals, but that the US came much closer than anyone else has over the last 230 years of having a democratic system, first granting universal male suffrage (including men of African descent in most of the northern ‘free’ states), then to all men in 1870 via the 15th Amendment, then women in 1919, and finally to ensure that qualified citizens of any race could vote –and I might point out that the Voting Rights Act could not have passed if it did not have the support of the vast majority of Americans, which kind of nullifies the whole ‘American bigot ‘ stereotype you tried to slip in with your claim that there could be no democracy anywhere in the country if those rights were illegally violated in a few states that were literally kept culturally and economically isolated since the Reconstruction period.

    It is revealing that civil rights in America came to the public consciousness once mass communication in the form of radio and television ‘shrank’ the country during the 1950s to the point that the systematic discrimination in the South could no longer be explained away or disguised; the general public could see for themselves the form that racial discrimination took and would no longer tolerate it.

    It is ironic that 50 years later, the whole country continues to be tarred by the racist label precisely because we revealed it to the world at the same time that we discovered it in our midst and started stamping it out.

    cheers

    horseback
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  2. #12
    WTE_Galway's Avatar Senior Member
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    meh ... its highly debatable as to whether democracy actually is a good thing.

    In essence its a political system that hands power to the rich and influential (for example the Rupert Murdoch's of the world) whilst allowing the average punter to sustain the delusion that they actually have a say in the process.
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  3. #13
    AndyJWest's Avatar Senior Member
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    I think that democracy would be a good thing. I don't think we've got it yet.

    Like Galway says, the Rupert Murdoch's of the world have too much influence. There is a solution to this, but I'd better not say - forum rules and all that.
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  4. #14
    I like the current trend in the US among conservatives to claim to want to outlaw Sharia law while...basically putting Sharia law into practice.
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  5. #15
    AndyJWest's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by Ba5tard5word:
    I like the current trend in the US among conservatives to claim to want to outlaw Sharia law while...basically putting Sharia law into practice.
    Shhhh... Don't give the game away...
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  6. #16
    Originally Posted by Treetop64 Go to original post
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    Math is very simple. people who look at math are complicated. but mathematics is patterns, simple. I prefer to help kids with math homework on https://writemyessaysonline.com
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