1. #1
    Here's the story, I was flying in my 109 and then suddenly some spit jumps me from behind. I manage to dive low and get away from him. Meanwhile, the nearest friendly base to me was about 3 minutes away. I was doing my best to figure out how long I could manage before my engine makes that "DIEING" noise until it becomes completely inoperable. I was doing well until 2 minutes when I start to hear faint hick-ups in my engine. It was only until like 15 seconds away from the airstrip where my engine becomes completely blown up and I couldn't make the landing.

    I was doing 80% throttle the whole way because I thought that if I max it at 100% I could risk overwhelming the engine and it would die faster.

    Do you have any more tips on how I could have made it for the last 15 seconds?
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  2. #2
    I've often wondered how this is moddeled myself, as to whether you benifit from lowering rpm.

    I suspect its a time thing like engine overheat damage, but thats just a guess, but with that in mind if i'm in a safish area, my policy is to firewall it and climb at best climb speed, and then glide in. From enough height you can glide a long way.

    fruitbat
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  3. #3
    You need to open up your radiator, I think, and make sure your prop pitch is either on Auto (for some german planes) or at %100 or %95, depending on what you're throttle is, you say its 80, so put it on %95 for cruising, maybe even 90.

    Also, raise your flaps, for less drag. But I think the big problem was you probably closed up your radiator in the chase to get more speed, and you forgot to put it back open and it killed your engine.

    It also could be because you had your mixture too low or high, IDK.


    EDIT:

    From the CEM guide:

    I have seen many complaints that the 109 series of aircraft engines only last a couple of minutes. This is not true. The reason the engine fails is that they are using improper prop pitch, fuel mixture, and radiator settings. The failures are caused by the pilot and have nothing to do with bugs or code. I have found the engines in the 109's to be very durable and I am able to over rev for short speed burst's without damage to the engine.
    So it's a combination of all three.
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  4. #4
    willyvic's Avatar Moderator
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    I firmly beblieve that it is the game engine itslelf that dictates when your engine goes south. Too many times I have been "in reach" of the threshold when my engine decides to quit. I really believe that the game knows when I am in reach of the runway!!!


    WV
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  5. #5
    Originally posted by thefruitbat:
    climb at best climb speed, and then glide in. From enough height you can glide a long way.
    Yep, that's exactly the thing to do - it might seem to be a good time to fly level and go as fast as you can towards home base, but if you are flying faster than best rate of climb speed (usually around 260-280 km/h for most aircraft in IL-2) then you are generally only wasting energy in the form of increased drag and higher fuel flows. If you have enough power to climb at a speed in that range, then do it! You are more efficient at that speed than a higher speed anyway, and the altitude you gain will then be turned into added gliding distance.

    Best glide speeds are quite variable, but if you don't have an accurate number, then remember that in most aircraft the best glide speed is around 20-40 km/h less than best climb. . .and don't forget to close your radiator, and pull your prop pitch all the way back to 0%.

    If I know I'm going to run out of gas before I get back to the ruwnay I'll often climb at best rate to an altitude appropriate to the distance I have to travel, and shut the engine down - that way I can land, startup, and taxi out of the way if in coops for example (or restart when on final approach if your power off landings aren't your strong point).
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  6. #6
    quote:
    "I have seen many complaints that the 109 series of aircraft engines only last a couple of minutes. This is not true. The reason the engine fails is that they are using improper prop pitch, fuel mixture, and radiator settings. The failures are caused by the pilot and have nothing to do with bugs or code. I have found the engines in the 109's to be very durable and I am able to over rev for short speed burst's without damage to the engine."

    The 109's are automatic. It is historic. They had a device that Messerschmitt called the black box that controlled prop pitch, mixture and radiators. All the pilot had to do was controll the throttle! You could turn this sytem off but only did so if the prop pitch sytem failed or was damaged. To turn it off otherwise was not advised by the Luftwaffe.

    The 190 had a simular but more complex and some say better automated sytem.
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  7. #7
    If I can, I get all the height my engine will give me and open the radiator (and back off the throttle to 90%- then 100% as it is sputtering to get that little bit more of altitude), and somewhat historically to what happened, pray I make it home. If I can't dead stick in, I want to at least make sure I have the altitude to decide if or when to bail or not. If the engine dies, there is a chance to restart if there is any life left in the old bird, sometimes. But having the time and altitude to make calm, rational decisions to me is the best asset.

    But then again, bailing isn't always the best option either. Remember how Molders got it in North Afrika (rolled his 109, bailed, but was tragically struck in the chest by his vertical stab upon exiting the craft).

    109s generally are much better gliders than a 190 or P-47 (historically, anyway)

    I have, on occasion, practised engine failure in different planes (shutting it off in mid-flight and trying to restart). Some seem easier to restart in flight than others. It is also, I understand a standard practice IRL to practise such. I once worked with a gent who claimed that he was a flight instructor at Glenview Naval Air Station in Illinois- he was cashiered when he accused a student of his that he was not being trained as a Kamikaze pilot
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  8. #8
    M_Gunz's Avatar Banned
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    Originally posted by Afromike1:
    Here's the story, I was flying in my 109 and then suddenly some spit jumps me from behind. I manage to dive low and get away from him. Meanwhile, the nearest friendly base to me was about 3 minutes away. I was doing my best to figure out how long I could manage before my engine makes that "DIEING" noise until it becomes completely inoperable. I was doing well until 2 minutes when I start to hear faint hick-ups in my engine. It was only until like 15 seconds away from the airstrip where my engine becomes completely blown up and I couldn't make the landing.

    I was doing 80% throttle the whole way because I thought that if I max it at 100% I could risk overwhelming the engine and it would die faster.

    Do you have any more tips on how I could have made it for the last 15 seconds?
    So you were jumped and engine hit? And low from diving to escape with enemy perhaps still trying to find you?
    Stay low, cut throttle a good ways and just maybe you don't run out of speed too fast.
    Climb? With someone either catching up in an undamaged plane or trying to find you then why risk becoming a dot against the sky?
    Big IF but IF you have a long flat stretch between you and the airfield then you could try running in ground effect at very low
    power and very low drag.

    7.7.3 - Skimming in Ground Effect

    one paragraph:
    Specifically, the procedure is to maintain best-glide speed right down into ground effect, even if this means that you enter ground effect over the swamp a tenth of a mile short of the intended landing place. Once you are in ground effect, start pulling back on the yoke. Because there is very little induced drag in ground effect (as discussed in connection with soft-field takeoffs in section 13.4), the airplane can fly at very low airspeeds with remarkably little drag. You can then fly all the way to the landing area in ground effect. It is like a prolonged flare; you keep pulling back gradually to cash in airspeed and pay for drag. This technique will not solve all the world's problems, but it is guaranteed to work better than trying to stretch the glide by pulling back before entering ground effect.
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  9. #9
    Originally posted by triad773:
    But then again, bailing isn't always the best option either. Remember how Molders got it in North Afrika (rolled his 109, bailed, but was tragically struck in the chest by his vertical stab upon exiting the craft).

    Not Molders, Here is molders death.
    On November 22, 1941 he was flying as a passenger in a Heinkel He 111 from the Crimea to Germany to attend the funeral of his superior and friend, Ernst Udet. Attempting to land at Breslau during a thunderstorm, the aircraft crashed. Mölders and the pilot were killed.

    I beleive you are reffering to Hans-Joachim Marseille the star of Afrika!
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  10. #10
    Originally posted by Freiwillige:

    I beleive you are reffering to Hans-Joachim Marseille the star of Afrika!
    Ah yes- you are correct. My mistake
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