1. #11
    ...what deepo said

    Deepo, if you find the virtualdub frameserver confusing, then I'll leave well alone!

    Biltongbru, I still maintain that you save a lot of time by not compressing with Divx in the Vegas render. I now always render out in HuffyUV. I believe Vegas renders faster in HuffyUV than it would in DivX dual pass.

    This gives me a lossless version. I can then experiment to my heart's content with video and audio codecs in VirtualDub without having to do the time consuming Vegas render as well.

    I can also use that HuffyUV version to encode two different versions - one at around 1500-2000 for downloading, and one at around 6000-10000 for keeping as a permanent master.

    (PS, software for writing the tutorial - MS Word for getting the text right with spell checker and grammar checker, notepad to strip out all the rubbish that MS Word puts in and manually adding the BBcode, PaintShopPro for the images, Photobucket.com for image storage.)
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  2. #12
    Hi Deepo and Joe:

    Thanks for the reply's; I must admit Deepo that I am not all that knowledgeable with all the terminology of the mechanics of rendering but regarding the audio I now have an answer to my suspicion of why I experience a quality loss with "PCM uncompressed" mode (whatever that means I donno). Joe, I will do a couple of experiments with Vegas/DivX rendering vs. Vegas/Huffy/Virtual dub/DivX rendering to see the time and quality difference.
    Thanks again for your reply's
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  3. #13
    hi biltongbru,

    don't fear the terminology
    it is invented by the industries to keep the secrets to themselves...
    however sorry, that i myself used it and still not pretending, that i know the exact meaning.

    concerning the audio-compression, 'pcm' means just 'pulse code modulation' - which is nothing more than transforming analogue to digital (like having a nice sinus-wave and hacking it in 22050 pieces per second where each of the pieces contains 16 bit information... which would be the old cd-standard). 'pcm uncompressed' is therefor the standard digital audio with no compression (like 'mp3')

    it should be very ok to use 'pcm uncompressed' as audio-format.
    the problems which i mentioned, happen sometimes, when you export as full video (like combined audio-video-stream). if such happens, you might try a separate export, and mux (combine) it with 'virtualdub'.
    distortion of the audio also sometimes happens,
    if audio is filtered inside the video-editor (depends on the audio-processing qualities of the program), or
    if several audio-tracks (like captured audio, additional music, effects) are either imported from different formats (sometimes, depends on format-interpretation - fe. when using variable bitrate audio together with constant bitrate. that is the reason, why 'virtualdub' still doesn't like variable bitrate mp3... too much inconsisteny with sample-count), or edited much different inside the editor (like adjusting captured audio and music, mixing them to a single-track and then adding effects)

    especially the latter case depends much on the internal audio-capabilities of the program. quality of audio depends on the internal dynamic-compression, frequency-filtering and subsequent normalisation of the whole stream.

    that might sound weird, at least it always does to me... however audio-artifats are very hard to eliminate.
    some points in summary:
    it is best to use an audio-editor to reformat all additional audio to the format used by the main video-footage. the captured video itself preferrably contains a high-quality audio already, like 'pcm uncompressed'. makes sure, the project-settings inside the video-editor is set to the main-footage audio, preferrably 'pcm uncompressed'.
    avoid by all means 'variable bitrate compression'-footage for editing (although good for final compression) - which is found many times in music-mp3. if such source is absolutely needed, reformat it with an audio-editor before editing and check quality. the way, a video-editor does that job, often includes undocumented sample-change to fit it already to the video.
    use as less audio-filtering as possible during editing and keep all audio-tracks separate until the finish. same as for video, deompressing audio and the mixing it with other audio is always with a loss in quality. a solution would be to export all audio-tracks individually after editing (full timeline, including silence) and mix them externally. then put audio and video together again in 'virtualdub'.

    most video-editors have flaws in audio-treatment. speaking for 'premiere' for example, the change to 'pro 1.5' had for the first time a separate audio-engine included, which was indeed very good (by far the best of all non-linear-editors that time), and still far worse than 'wavelab' (clearly represented in prices as well). after all, commercial productions have it strictly separated.
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  4. #14
    Thanks deepo for the valuable info
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  5. #15
    did you use fraps do not ask
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  6. #16
    xodi's Avatar Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    1
    Originally posted by Joe-90:
    It's a question that has been asked many times before, and will be asked many times to come "How do I compress my movie?"

    Whatever codec you use, and there are many, the most important figure is the bitrate. The higher the bitrate, the more bits you get and the higher the quality. More bits also mean a larger filesize. So you have to decide on a bitrate that keeps the filesize down, but the quality up.

    If your movie is to be downloaded over the Internet, you will want to keep the size as low as possible. A good bitrate for short downloadable movies is 1.5Mbps (1.5 megabits per second).

    There are three main codecs that are currently the best to use:

    * Windows Movie Maker encodes movies with the Windows Media Video (WMV) codec and is the simplest to use. It also has the advantage that anyone with a Windows PC will almost certainly be able to watch your video without having to install any other codecs. It's main disadvantages are that it is fairly limited in its options and also a lot of non-Microsoft applications will not recognise it.

    * In my opinion, the best codec to use is the propriety DivX or its competitor, the free XviD. At the time of writing, I consider DivX to offer slightly better quality.

    * The third most popular codec is the H264 codec used in QuickTime .mov files. I know nothing about this as I'm a PC, not a Mac! You'll have to buy it, by the way.
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  7. #17
    Great topic
    Well, here are some tools you can use to compress video files:
    Virtual Dub(Best)
    Media Coder
    Dr. DivX
    Tmpegenc
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  8. #18
    Originally posted by Joe-90:
    It's a question that has been asked many times before, and will be asked many times to come "How do I compress my movie?"

    Whatever codec you use, and there are many, the most important figure is the bitrate. The higher the bitrate, the more bits you get and the higher the quality. More bits also mean a larger filesize. So you have to decide on a bitrate that keeps the filesize down, but the quality up.

    If your movie is to be downloaded over the Internet, you will want to keep the size as low as possible. A good bitrate for short downloadable movies is 1.5Mbps (1.5 megabits per second).

    There are three main codecs that are currently the best to use:

    * Windows Movie Maker encodes movies with the Windows Media Video (WMV) codec and is the simplest to use. It also has the advantage that anyone with a Windows PC will almost certainly be able to watch your video without having to install any other codecs. It's main disadvantages are that it is fairly limited in its options and also a lot of non-Microsoft applications will not recognise it.

    * In my opinion, the best codec to use is the propriety DivX or its competitor, the free XviD. At the time of writing, I consider DivX to offer slightly better quality.

    * The third most popular codec is the H264 codec used in QuickTime .mov files. I know nothing about this as I'm a PC, not a Mac! You'll have to buy it, by the way.
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  9. #19
    RadarUBICOM's Avatar Banned
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    Mar 2009
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    2
    hi there!

    nice tutorial

    my opinion about VMW format is unlucky for youtube upload, cause youtube forces a recompression...
    its a pity cause MovMaker is really smart for short-times productions

    hwv, after many tries I reached "my standard" for video recording/encoding

    unfortunately i discovered two things:
    - i cant use LAME layer 3 encoder; audio when coding with it appear cutted: 3 secs clean + 0,5 sec of silence looping over the whole vid; so i choosed another audio encoder
    - last week the running mp3 encoder disappeared from encoders list; i tried download every free layer 3 audio codec (fraunofer, lame , xing, ... ) but i cant let 'em appear in my audio codec list so i am now coverting audio to OGG Vorbis file format 44.100Hz/128kps

    i hope someone could give me some hints to solve this bugging
    (hope I typed understandable english too )
    have great time,
    d.


    PS: even if i registered my ubi-account on June 6th 2008, it strangely i appear registered today ... seems being really a twisted week
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  10. #20
    Old thread here but I assume the process is still pretty much the same.

    I'm having trouble getting HuffyUV to process uncompressed files in Vdub. I have left everything on default but it give me an error message that it can't process.

    I want to take my fraps capture, crop and color correct in Vdub. Then save it uncompressed and lossless to an AVI so I can edit in Vegas. Then I want to do the same with vegas after the editing is finished. Save the file uncompressed then do my final compressing with XVid in Virtual Dub.

    What could I be doing wrong with Huffy?
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