1. #1
    MB_Avro_UK's Avatar Senior Member
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    Hi all,

    In November 1940 Royal Navy carrier borne Swordfish biplane torpedo aircraft attacked the Italian fleet at Taranto harbour in Italy.

    The Italian fleet suffered massive damage against the loss of two Sworfish aircraft.

    This was the first use of carrier borne aircraft against a navy fleet in harbour. It has been suggested that the Japanese were inspired by this success and using similar tactics attacked Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

    Here's a clip from a documentary of the Taranto attack:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jieyK...elated&search=




    Best Regards,
    MB_Avro.
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  2. #2
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    Indisputably. See AT DAWN WE SLEPT by Prange. This one is a fact.
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  3. #3
    Howdy!! MB_Avro_UK, WoW!! Great video!!! <span class="ev_code_RED">COOL</span>







    Cowboy up!!



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  4. #4
    VW-IceFire's Avatar Senior Member
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    I want to do that in Storm of War sometime... That was really interesting!

    The Taranto raid and Pearl Harbor are compared fairly frequently when one or the other is mentioned. It seems the idea to attach wooden fins to the torpedoes so they wouldn't run as deep influenced the Japanese to do the same. Is there truth to that?
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  5. #5
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    Well, for that matter, Billy Mitchell predicted an attack on Pearl Harbor during his Court Martial in the 1920's, but the idea never occurred to the Japanese until Taranto, they never even prepared a speculative staff plan. Yamamoto saw what the Royal Navy did with one modern carrier and a small force of obsolete torpedo planes, and decided that with all six of Japan's fast carriers concentrated, he could smash the Pacific Fleet.

    Solving the problem of making the Japanese torpedoes avoid plowing into the bottom was essential to the conduct of the raid. The solution was not easy, and was not found until nearly the last minute. It involved 4 "C"-shaped fins placed between the standard fins, and a wooden airfoil placed behind the fins.
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  6. #6
    BfHeFwMe's Avatar Banned
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    Lets stick with actual history. Feb 1904 Japan pulled it's first Pearl against the Russians in Port Aurthur with a surprise torpedo attack on the Russian Pacific Fleet in harbor. It was also undeclared, a sneak attack. It succeeded in putting the Russians on the defensive, and they lost.

    Big difference, Britain was already in a declared war. Sure they adopted some tactical aspects but the overall strategy, you could say, was most definitely home grown.
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  7. #7
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    Gee, that was a subtle, trenchant sally, BfHeFwMe....
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  8. #8
    I believe that was an earlier 20s/30s USN fleet exercise where the Lex/Sara was up against the surface ships. The objective was to avoid getting spotted by the surface units while getting the planes over the Panama Canal locks to simulate an attack on the locks. The carriers won that exercise.

    Apparantly the IJN observers were there to take note.
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  9. #9
    I'd always thought that the Japanese were considering similar plans to this, and the Taranto raid merely confirmed the viability of such an attack, so they proceeded with planning Pearl.

    But it's difficult to say one way or the other, I'd say, it being nearly 70 years after the fact.
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  10. #10
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    Read Prange. The Japanese strategy hsd always been a strategic defensive in the event of a war with the U.S. Let the U.S. carry out War Plan Orange---the great strategic thrust across the Pacific---and the Japanese planned to attrite the U.S. Navy every step of the way using every means they had. The culmination would be a grand battle fought on their terms, in their home waters, with a badly depleted U.S. fleet. That was the plan. They NEVER planned to reach out across the Pacific to hit the U.S. Navy in it anchorage: (1) because the Pacific Fleet was never based at Pearl Harbor, it was based on the West Coast of the United States until a Presidential order sent it to Hawaii in the fall of 1940 against the advice of the C-in-C of the Pacific Fleet who was sacked by FDR. (2) The entire strategy of the Japanese Navy was based on luring the U.S. Navy forward to its destruction, not in presenting their heavy warships to the Americans on a platter. Yamamoto reversed the grand strategic plan, and this caused a great deal of unease in the fleet. Furthermore, one of his closest advisors, Admiral Ugaki, warned him the Americans would be enraged by a surprise attack on the fleet. Yamamoto ignored his warnings. Pearl harbor was only the first of many strategic blunders made by Yamamoto.
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