View Poll Results: From time to time I will post some naval and maritime stories, tradtitions and tidbits both persona

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  1. #11
    €œCritter Fingers€
    A Short Story About Navy Chow

    There€s always been a joke throughout the U.S. Navy about how terrible the food is. The reason why is because the Mess Specialist (now Culinary Specialist) cannot put spices in the food. Some people are allergic to certain things like salt, pepper, garlic and the like. In addition, if the ship that your are stationed on has a lot of personnel, like the Aircraft Carrier that I was one, the Mess Specialist has to prepare for over 3000 people during the day and about 2000 at night. That€s split between two Galleys, one fore and one aft of the ship. The portions are small, and the food is bland, so it creates a lot of discontent amongst the crew a lot of times. So here€s the story:

    The chow line was its normal size. About an hour wait time to get your food and if you€re lucky, you get an hour for chow. So the crew was wrapped around Hangar Bay Two waiting in line and spreading the €œScuttlebutt€ (naval rumors) of the day. The guy in front of me was an Aviation Boatswains Mate (Fuels) First Class Petty Officer who was in a hurry to get some chow before the start of flight operations. After waiting for 45 minutes in line we finally were able to get our chow. You never know what€s on the menu because it€s something that€s just not advertised. The chow for the day was €œCritter Fingers€, a nickname for a meat-something that you couldn€t describe. Most of the time it€s chicken, but this time we weren€t for sure.

    Anyway, the ABF1 in front of me got his tray of food. He stopped and looked at it, turned to me and said, €œDo you believe this ****? I€ve been sailing in this **** Navy for almost 20 years now, and this is by far the worst chow I€ve ever seen! I wouldn€t even feed this to my wife, and she€s the best dog I€ve ever had!€

    Amused and laughing quite loudly, I retorted, €œHey, it will keep you alive€¦ bon appetite, shipmate€.

    Just then the Mess Specialist who actually prepared most of the chow that day was downright livid. He heard the whole conversation, and came storming out from behind the chow line and started screaming at us. €œYou don€t have to eat my food! You can go (defecate) in your hands and eat that instead€

    The ABF1 said €œWouldn€t make a difference€¦ it€s the same thing€.

    I had to control the situation. So I turned to the ABF1 and said, €œLook, these guys work just as hard as we do. You don€t have to slam this guys because the food is bland and whatnot. In fact, these guys are pretty talented and you need to appreciate their skills instead of complaining about it€.

    The Mess Specialist turned to me with a look of shock on his face and said €œThanks man, that one of the nicest things anyone has ever said about my job€.

    Then with a quirky smile I said €œYeah, this guys are the only people that I know of that can take flavor out of food€¦ good old Navy chow, where the only thing warm is the milk!€

    Boy was that guy ticked off!
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  2. #12
    Machinist Mate First Class Petty Officer Harold W. Lee
    USN/AD 1940-1945
    USNR 1952-1953

    My Grandfather was born on November 13, 1922. He joined the US Navy in September 1940 at Great Lake Naval Training Station. From there he was sent to his €œA€ School, where he learned to operate, maintain and service the ship€s engine systems.

    His first real duty station was onboard the USS Arizona (BB-61), in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. On December 7, 1941 he was just getting out of his rack and getting ready for Sunday Service at the Base Chapel when the sound of loud booms and sirens went off on the ship. His primary General Quarters station was in the machinery spaces below decks, but he decided to go topside to see what was going on. What he found was total chaos. The Japanese Navy was attacking Pearl Harbor.

    When he arrived topside he was on the starboard side and aft of the ship, his immediate reaction was to man the anti-aircraft guns and fire away. He, along with Dorey Miller, seemed to be the only serviceman who was actually engaging the enemy on the USS Arizona.

    My Grandfather never did shoot down any aircraft as a well placed bomb ripped through the forward magazine and detonated the entire stock of 5in and 14in projectiles for the ship main and secondary batteries. When the ship blew up, it threw him overboard into what was once a lime green colored water and was now stained with oil and blood.

    As he was sent over the starboard side a piece of jagged shrapnel pierced both of his legs together right before he hit the water. He then proceeded to swim ashore, despite the immense pain and loss of blood. When he got to shore he found a dead marine with a M1 Garrand rifle beside him. On his back, my Grandfather fired 8 rounds at the Japanese "Zeros" before he passed out from blood loss. For his actions, he was awarded the Navy Cross, the second highest award in the US Navy.

    He spent two years in rehabilitation, and was told that his fighting days were over. But my Grandfather€¦ who is notoriously stubborn, stayed in and was returned to active duty in June of 1943. He reason being is that he wanted to exact revenge for the loss of all his friends and shipmates on the USS Arizona. In June 1943 he was transferred to Higgins boat duty to serve as a Coxswain. He participated in Operation Torch landings in North Africa, and also amphibious landings in Sicily.

    On June 6th, 1944 he was part of the landings at Normandy Beach at D-Day. His task was to deliver troops from troop transport ships to Utah Beach. I thank God he didn€t pull Omaha, because he€s bitter enough over Pearl Harbor! He performed 7 trips to and from that beach and watched countless men die while charging that beachhead.

    After D-Day he was transferred to the familiar Pacific Theater where he did the landings at Iwo Jima and Okinawa. When the war ended, he returned home with the Navy Cross, two Bronze Stars with Oak Leaf Clusters, WWII Victory Medal, Good Conduct and a slew of other awards.

    In 1952, he was recalled to active duty to serve in Korea to drive the Higgins boats once again for a year.

    His extreme sacrifce and devotion to duty reflect a great credit upon himself and while keeping within the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
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  3. #13
    Originally posted by AO1_AW_SW_USN:
    Similar "fraternities" in the navy include:
    1. The Order of the Blue Nose for sailors who have crossed the Arctic Circle.
    2. The Order of the Red Nose for sailors who have crossed the Antarctic Circle.
    3. The Order of the Golden Dragon for sailors who have crossed the International Date Line.
    What if you gat all of these??? Highly unlikeable, but possble. What do you call thoes dudes???
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  4. #14
    Originally posted by AO1_AW_SW_USN:
    Carrier Landings €" A game involving a long flat table and, generally, a lot of beer. Participants run toward the table and dive onto it face-first. The goal is to arrive safely and not slide off the end. Refinements such as the need to engage "arresting gear" with one€s toes, "crash and smash" teams using pitchers of beer to extinguish post-crash fires, etc., are common.
    Thank you. Sounds fun. And like somthing drunk sailors would make up.
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  5. #15
    The_Silent_O's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by AO1_AW_SW_USN:
    ...

    A.F.R.T.S. - Spoken as "a-farts", Armed Forces Radio and Television System is a US system providing television and radio entertainment to forces overseas. Recently, the preferred interpretation has become "American Forces Radio and Television Services."


    ...
    We also suffer this "entertainment" in the Army, boy love those three year old shows, public service anouncements and the overly *****y news anchor(wo)men...makes you miss network TV and regular commercials in a bad way.
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  6. #16
    Originally posted by WilhelmSchulz:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AO1_AW_SW_USN:
    Similar "fraternities" in the navy include:
    1. The Order of the Blue Nose for sailors who have crossed the Arctic Circle.
    2. The Order of the Red Nose for sailors who have crossed the Antarctic Circle.
    3. The Order of the Golden Dragon for sailors who have crossed the International Date Line.
    What if you gat all of these??? Highly unlikeable, but possble. What do you call thoes dudes??? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Never met anyone or know of anyone who has. I'd believe that they are masters of the sea and is in great standing with King Neptune and his high court!
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  7. #17
    Originally posted by The_Silent_O:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AO1_AW_SW_USN:
    ...

    A.F.R.T.S. - Spoken as "a-farts", Armed Forces Radio and Television System is a US system providing television and radio entertainment to forces overseas. Recently, the preferred interpretation has become "American Forces Radio and Television Services."


    ...
    We also suffer this "entertainment" in the Army, boy love those three year old shows, public service anouncements and the overly *****y news anchor(wo)men...makes you miss network TV and regular commercials in a bad way. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I just love watching about 30 miniutes of the Super Bowl while I'm out at sea. We have Satelite for coverage and the radar systems interfer with the signal. So the delay was bad enough, but the fuzzy lines... that's too much.

    I also loved the way they sensor what the troops, airman and sailors should see as far as news coverage. They'll go over some of the top stories, but the rest is about different duty stations and personnel.
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  8. #18
    Originally posted by WilhelmSchulz:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AO1_AW_SW_USN:
    Carrier Landings €" A game involving a long flat table and, generally, a lot of beer. Participants run toward the table and dive onto it face-first. The goal is to arrive safely and not slide off the end. Refinements such as the need to engage "arresting gear" with one€s toes, "crash and smash" teams using pitchers of beer to extinguish post-crash fires, etc., are common.
    Thank you. Sounds fun. And like somthing drunk sailors would make up. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    ... did this once, and I was crashed and smashed!
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  9. #19
    Naval Terminology, €œD€ List

    Notes:
    --'RN' denotes Royal Navy usage. Similarly, RCN = Royal Canadian Navy, RAN = Royal Australian Navy, RM = Royal Marines, RNZN = Royal New Zealand Navy, UK = general usage in militaries of the former British Empire
    --Terms in ALL-CAPS have a separate listing.


    Dabtoe - (RN) Surface sailor.

    DACT €" Dissimilar Air Combat Training. ACM conducted between aircraft of different types. Also seen as DACM. Valuable in that it teaches an aircrew to consider comparative performance points of their aircraft and others.

    Datum €" (1) A point or location where a submarine has been detected or has made its own detection possible, especially by firing missiles or torpedoes. (2) The horizontal row of green reference lights found on a FRESNEL LENS array, which indicate the optimum glideslope.

    DC - Damage Control.

    DCA - Damage Control Assistant. Responsible, under the Chief Engineer, for damage control and stability of a ship.

    Dead Head €" The resistance of a magnetic compass to swinging back and forth excessively; a compass with insufficient deadhead will swing so much (due to normal movement of the ship or aircraft) that it is difficult to steer a course.

    Dead Horse - An interest-free loan which is paid off via payroll deduction. Often used to cover relocation expenses, or to pay back a disbursing error which was originally in your favor.

    Deadlight €" A glass window set in the deck or bulkhead.

    Deck €" What the civilian calls a floor. See FLOOR
    .
    Deck Ape - Surface fleet personnel, usually Boatswain's Mates, that care for topside gear and equipment. A type of KNUCKLE-DRAGGER.

    6 D's - Deep Diving Death Defying (or Dealing) Denizens of the Deep. Term used by submariners to refer to themselves. Often used to detect SKIMMERs by their helpless laughter upon hearing the phrase.

    Deeps - (RN) Submariner.

    Deep Six €" (1) Originally, the call of the leadsman signifying that the water is more than 6 fathoms deep, but less than seven. (2) Euphemism for throwing something overboard. Also seen as 'splash', 'float check', 'float test'.

    Deflection €" 1) (Gunnery) The adjustment of fire to the left or right. 2) (Aviation) A measure of angle-off between one€s aircraft and the opponent, or the amount of lead necessary to hit a crossing target.

    Demurrage €" A fine levied for not unloading a ship on time.

    Depart, Departure €" (Aviation) (1) More properly, Standard Instrument Departure (SID). One of a number of standard combinations of flight profile and headings used to depart an airfield. Used to regularize and speed up an aircraft€s departure from the airfield and its crowded airspace. SIDs are published procedures. (2) Short for €˜departure from controlled flight,€ a regime of flight where the aircraft is uncontrollable. Generally the result of a stall, whether accelerated or unaccelerated. May or may not result in the aircraft entering a spin.

    Deuce €" (or Ma Deuce) Browning cal fifty heavy machine gun.

    (The) Devil to Pay €" Originally, the saying was "The devil to pay and no pitch hot." In the old wooden-hulled ships, €˜devil€ seams joined the external hull timbers with the deck planking; there are also references to a devil seam back aft, where the hull timbers join at the rudder post. Seams were caulked or sealed€"paid€"by jamming oakum fiber into the gaps, then smearing the seam with melted pitch or tar. If one of these seams worked open in rough weather, a great deal of water could be shipped before it was repaired. This term is probably the origin of the terms "hell to pay" and "between the devil and the deep blue sea."

    DGUTS €" Don€t Give Up The Ship.

    DIB - (RCN) Any non-engineering personnel.

    Dickey Front €" (UK) The flap in the front of the traditional sailor€s trousers.

    Dip - To lower a sonar transducer into the water from a hovering helicopter.

    Direct Fire €" Gunnery and fire control where the fall of shot can be directly observed by the firing unit.

    Dirt Sailor €" A member of the Navy€s Construction Battalions (Seabees).

    Dirty Shirt Wardroom €" (USN) A wardroom (officer€s mess and lounge) aboard ship which does not require patrons to be in the uniform of the day, i.e. flight suits or other working uniforms are permitted. The etiquette of the wardroom, which is usually fairly formal, is also relaxed in the dirty shirt wardroom.

    Dit - (RN) Short written note.

    Ditty Bag €" A small cloth bag with drawstring closure; usually used to hold toilet articles and the like.

    Dive the intakes - Cleaning engine air intakes, usually by crawling into them.

    Dive Planes €" The "elevators" of a submarine; movable, horizontal surfaces used to control the dive (pitch) angles. Usually there are two pairs of planes, mounted on bow and stern, or on the fairwater (sail) and stern.

    DIW €" Dead In the Water. Not making any headway (q.v.).

    Dixie Cup - The USN sailor's white hat. See also WHITEHAT.

    Dixie Station - One of the two positions typically occupied by an aircraft carrier off the coast of Vietnam. 'Dixie' was the southern station, tasked with troop support (CAS).

    Dobie - (RCN) Laundry. Also seen as 'Dhobi.'

    Dobie Dust - (RCN) Laundry soap.

    Dockyard Tour - (RN) An excuse to slide away early when at a fleet school.

    Dodge City - Diego Garcia island, a British possession in the approximate middle of the Indian Ocean. US military forces also have operated from there.

    Dog Dish €" The white hat worn by junior enlisted personnel. See also DIXIE CUP.

    Dog Watch €" (1) A shortened watch period. Generally, two two-hour watches, designated First and Second (or First and Last, RCN), arranged so that personnel on watch can eat the evening meal. Usually 1600 to 1800 and 1800 to 2000. Also serves to alternate the daily watch routine so sailors with the midwatch one night will not have it the next time. Origin of term unclear. (2) (RCN) An unpopular watch, usually the 2400-0400 or 0400-0800. See also WATCH.

    Dolphins - The warfare insignia of the submarine fleet. Aka 'tin tunas', 'pukin' fish'. Represented as two heraldic dolphins flanking the prow of a WW II-type submarine, gold for officers and silver for enlisted. "Getting (one's) dolphins"--achieving the status of a qualified submariner.

    Double Nuts - Aircraft with side number zero-zero. Often the CAG's bird.

    DOW - Diving Officer of the Watch.

    Down to the Short Strokes - Nearly done; almost finished.

    Draeger Tubes - An older method of sampling atmosphere, in which a hand-held pump is used to draw samples into the test system.

    Drifty €" A sailor who is not SQUARED AWAY. Probably comes from €˜adrift.€

    Drilling holes in the water (or ocean) - Term for miscellaneous underwater operations of a submarine. Also refers to sailing any ship from point A to point B for no particular reason.

    Drip - (RN) Complain. "The Chief was dripping about the state of the world."

    Droplights - Red lights arranged vertically below the RAMP, on the approach centerline, on the carrier's stern. Used to provide lineup cues for night landings.

    Drunkex €" Any evolution characterized more by the amount of alcohol consumption than by accomplishment of any goals (other than getting toasted, of course).

    Dry Thrust €" (Aviation) Thrust rating of an aircraft jet engine without afterburner
    .
    DTG - (1) Days To Go. Short-timer's record-keeping. (2) Date-Time Group, part of the header of a message which indicates the date, time, and timezone of the message's origin.

    Duff - (RCN, RN) (1) Dessert. (2) Broken, or useless.

    Dumbo €" During World War Two, an aircraft (often a B-17) modified for long range air-sea rescue.

    Dusty- (RN) Stores rating, especially one concerned with food. More fully 'Jack Dusty'. USN usage, 'Jack o' the Dust.' In its original usage, the €˜Dusty€ was a sailor (Jack, in British naval terminology) assigned responsibility for the bread room, where flour was stowed.

    Dynamited Chicken €" Chicken a la King.
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  10. #20
    Chrystine's Avatar Senior Member
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    €œ It's a person in an Engineering Department who stands a normal 4 hour watch while underway. Depending on the size of the ship and the size of the ship's Engineering Department a person might stand two to three AOW watches every four days or so.€

    Thanks very much.
    I€m still a tad €˜foggy€ regarding however, and what€s confusing my grasp here is - why is it said to be €˜auxiliary?€

    Maybe my civilian / literal interpretation of the term is the confounding-issue?

    Thanks again, if you€ll still not mind further elucidating for my benefit.
    This is all great stuff!

    Best,
    ~ C.

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