1. #1
    Tully__'s Avatar Global Moderator
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    Original version of this thread is locked. Those who were involved in the "duel" will stay out of this version or more bans will enacted. I'm not particularly interested whether you think you did nothing wrong, anything even remotely on the "duel" topic will result in a ban.

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    Salut
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  2. #2
    Xiolablu3's Avatar Senior Member
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    Gibbage,

    the Hawker Typhoon was designed as a fighter to replace the hurricane but not haveing the merlin engine was inferior at med to high altitude and so was developed as a ground attack fighter because of its excellent low level performance and heavy armament.

    The tempest was an improvement of the typhoon and by this time both were being developed as ground attack planes and so I am pretty sure the tempest was made for ground attack primarily, and maybe some low level dogfighting was considered too.
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  3. #3
    VW-IceFire's Avatar Senior Member
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    Even when this isn't a really good comparison we see that the Tempests biggest attributes are firepower, speed, and low altitude performance which its known for. The Tempest being modeled for FB is a late war model (with the Mk V Hispano cannons instead of the longer Mk II) and probably has even more responsive controls than the one they tested there.

    Should be comperable to most of the 190's (including D-9's) at the lower altitude game. Which is what I'm counting on

    Besides, its time to bust some tanks and do some ground attack.

    - IceFire
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  4. #4
    VW-IceFire's Avatar Senior Member
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    Strange my post went to the top. Not sure if this is old and its been dredged up by the forum software? I love talking about this bird

    Typhoon was the original version of the fighter which failed as an interceptor and became a very capable ground attack fighter. The tactical airforces used it alot. Sort of similar to what the P-47 was used for later in the war (hunting tanks and convoys).

    Tempest was a true fighter bomber in that it was a high performance plane in the middle to low altitude range as well as keeping the tactical attack abilities of its predecessor the Typhoon.

    The engine was always a problem lighting on fire and having monoxide leaks and the like but once it was running it was very powerful...and yes the thick wings kept the Typhoon slower than it could be (although it was very fast when introduced in 1941-42) but the Tempest uses laminar flow wings like the Mustang (not quite as thin as I understand it). So it was fast...quite fast. In FB it'll be more like a D9 or a Mustang than a La or a Bf 109.

    - IceFire
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  5. #5
    love the tempest awesome ground attack aircraft.
    Sorry for the unscientific opinion.

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  6. #6

    Tempest V

    The Hawker Tempest was designed, and used as, a fighter. It had excellent ground attack capabilities (with the same bomb/rocket capacity as the Typhoon), but usually was used as a long range marauder, going after enemy aircraft below 20,000ft.
    It had about 20 kills against the Me262; indeed, one former 262 pilot said that the only Allied fighter that frightened them was the Tempest, due to its rapid acceleration, heavy armament and its stability as a gun platform.
    As the Tempest V had a 14% thinner wing than the Typhoon, with a much larger wing area, it was faster at all altitudes. And while true that it’s forte was below 20,000ft, Roland Beamont stated that it remained an effective fighter at all altitudes (the Typhoon ‘flew like a ton of bricks above 20,000 feet’).
    Beamont also recounted in his book, ‘My Part of the Sky’, an encounter between a Tempest and a USAAF P51D. The Mustang mistook the Tempest for a German, and attacked from above and behind, but the Tempest pilot had spotted him, and had prepared for just such an eventuality. He banked sharply, then got onto the Mustang’s tail, staying with the Mustang in several manoeuvres, and placing a burst either side of the Mustang.
    The Tempest pilot then flew alongside, pointed to the rounded on his fuselage, flicked the v-sign at the P51 pilot, and accelerated away.
    Obviously, this took place below 20,000ft, as the P51D was superior in every respect above that altitude; it nevertheless shows that below that, the Tempest really was the fastest Allied aircraft of WWII — and at least as manoeuvrable as the Mustang.
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