1. #1
    anyone know why most if not all of the japanese planes have that yellow leading edge on the wings? Seems to kind of spoil some of their camoflage, as does a giant yellow nose on a 109e but i thought that was a macho thing. newho, sorry if its really obvious or somethin
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  2. #2
    anyone know why most if not all of the japanese planes have that yellow leading edge on the wings? Seems to kind of spoil some of their camoflage, as does a giant yellow nose on a 109e but i thought that was a macho thing. newho, sorry if its really obvious or somethin
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  3. #3
    Friendly recognition device. So yes it did spoil the camo.
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  4. #4
    GoToAway's Avatar Senior Member
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    I don't know about the Japanese, but the European Axis powers used yellow for the same reason that the Allies painted black and white stripes on their aircraft for the Normandy invasion - identification. Before radar and IFF everything had to be IDed visually, and it kind of sucked to lose your planes to friendly pilots because they couldn't tell if they were shooting a friendly or not. Bright, distinctive markings helped with this.

    I don't think that the Japanese had that problem as much, though. Their roundel was much more visible than, say, the iron cross or the British roundel.
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  5. #5
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BlakJakOfSpades:
    anyone know why most if not all of the japanese planes have that yellow leading edge on the wings? Seems to kind of spoil some of their camoflage, as does a giant yellow nose on a 109e but i thought that was a macho thing. newho, sorry if its really obvious or somethin <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Quick identification in the AIR.

    The green camouflage is intended to facilitate hiding the a/c on the ground. Here's a something I put together on the early development of German camouflage and markings in WW2, which helps explain this issue.

    Jagdwaffe Single Engine Schemes 1938-1940

    The same reasoning was at work with the Japanese quick ID markings.
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  6. #6
    makes sense, so how about those g-6 skins in the game where they have invasion stripes? did the germans at one time paint invasion stripes on their planes?
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  7. #7
    horseback's Avatar Senior Member
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    Yellow inner wing leading edge markings on Imperial Japanese Army & Navy planes was for ID from headon aspect, where fuselage and wing insignia are a little hard to see. Allied fighters in the Southwest Pacific used white leading edges and/or vertical fuselage/tail stripes for quick ID of friendlies.

    RAF in Europe used the outer wing leading edges for their yellow "distemper" markings for the same reason. P-47s and P-51s initially used white stripes on nose and tail surfaces (the ponies also had wing stripes) to keep trigger happy bomber gunners from shooting at them.

    cheers

    horseback
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  8. #8
    Chuck_Older's Avatar Banned
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BlakJakOfSpades:
    makes sense, so how about those g-6 skins in the game where they have invasion stripes? did the germans at one time paint invasion stripes on their planes? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    There are some wacky skins in there, like the MiG-3 "taxi".
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  9. #9
    Haha look at the Il-2 for wacky. That psychadelic skin? it's nuts.
    But as for the Japanese markings, wouldnt the Yellow stripe down the front of the wing leave it difficult to ID the plane from any direction but head on? The Germans had the entire nose and tail section sometimes painted Yellow, but the Japanese always seemed to just paint the leading wing edge Yellow.
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  10. #10
    duh action, its becuase the Japanese planes are always TnBing, so you will always see the leading edge quickly.
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