1. #1
    There was many Amerika bomber projects in Nazi Germany - with intention of bombing eastern coast of US from mainland Europe, Africa, Great Britain (had it been occupied) or Atlantic islands (Azores).

    Ignoring the many seemingly impossible technical issues, there's one obvious tactical question however I can't find an answer to. How did these people expect those piston powered, unescorted, high flying and thus early detected bombers not to get minced by US land based interceptors, namely P-47s?

    It's hard to imagine huge and expensive projects like Me 264, He 277, Ta 400,... would have been running wihtout answering such an obvious question.

    Thoughts?
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  2. #2
    I guess surprise would have something to do with it. Didn't one of the proposed designs have a parasite fighter too? I guess in desperate times, anything seems like a good idea.
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  3. #3
    Look at it another way. At the same moment as Germany was considering plans for Amerika bombers the US, at great expense, built up the 8th. Airforce in England. It too used slow, high flying, piston powered aircraft and for at least the first twelve months of operations they got minced by LW land based interceptors.

    Aircrew, along with other combatants, were expendable.
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  4. #4
    But the philosophy at the time was that "the bombers would always get through". I don't think crews were sacrificed with malicious intent from those in command.
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  5. #5
    Originally posted by Luno13:
    But the philosophy at the time was that "the bombers would always get through".
    I thought the Germans got the lesson during BOB.
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  6. #6
    The most promising "Amerika Bomber"-design:
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  7. #7
    ^ diving after that might prove a challenge even for a P-47!
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  8. #8
    horseback's Avatar Senior Member
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    Early and pre war plans were based on the fact that radar was either non-existant, or that it was in its infancy and had short range & scattered deployment. Covering the 1500 odd miles of the US East Coast with radar was almost impossible for most of the war; large gaps discernable to a good ECM operator would be easy to exploit.

    Add in the limited capability for IFF (Identification Friend or Foe) even well after WWII, and raids by individual long range bombers coming in over the Atlantic seaboard could very easily have been very disruptive, if only in terms of the numbers of men and materials required to counter them.

    Assuming that the Gemans had aircraft capable of making the round trip with a useful bombload, they could easily have tied down a half million men (or more) in ships, radar stations and air bases along the coasts from Florida to Maine (and what about the Canadian coasts?) with less than 200 bombers and the men required to support them...

    That's a pretty good investment from their point of view.

    cheers

    horseback
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  9. #9
    Sure HB, but with limited ressources avaliable, this would have been a logisticas-nightmare.

    Even more so when considering the nav-aids availiable at the time.
    The "Amerkia"-bombers couldn't have done better than any other bomber during the time at finding the target.
    Nuisance-bombing in Southern England worked well, because it took little effort and dien't cut-off ressources too much.

    Flying accross the Atlantic only to bomb aunt Marge's empty barn would have been kind of heart-attack bait for people like Speer or Milch...
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  10. #10
    horseback's Avatar Senior Member
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    Actually, from Chesapeake Bay north to Boston(from Norfolk Virginia to Boston Massachussetts), there were and still are many, many industrial and transportation hubs that would be hard to miss, even at night with a blackout.

    Of course, the Germans were operating on a shoestring by 1943, so they may not have been able to support the effort. However, the return on the investment might well have been over a thousand to one in terms of Allied manpower and assets diverted from direct assault on German interests to defend against irregular bombing raids over the US coasts, not to mention the propaganda advantages and political problems it would cause FDR...

    cheers

    horseback
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