1. #1
    SCAgent95's Avatar Senior Member
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    SC1 Severonickel/NPP New Footage.

    A while ago they was a leak with old demos/betas of ps2/xbox games, a disc with the xbox beta version of SC1 was among them, that version included the cut levels of Severonickel (which became Kola Cell in the mission pack) and Nuclear Power Plant (which became the exclusive PS2 Level)

    Bunch of fans have managed to run it with the xbox emulator and play some of it, check it out!

    https://www.reddit.com/r/Splintercell/comments/pwb9ac/with_a_little_hexadecimal_surgery_ive_cracked_the/

    https://www.reddit.com/r/Splintercell/comments/pwqugn/i_noticed_that_quite_a_few_people_are_unable_to/

    https://www.reddit.com/r/Splintercel...l_screenshots/
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  2. #2
    LuckyBide's Avatar Senior Member
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    Even if we had parts of this level through the Kola Cell mission I wished we had the entire Severonickel mission, the level looks so huge and fun. I'm sad the outdoor snowy parts didn't end up in the Kola Cell mission, I love this type of atmosphere so much in SC.
    Thanks for sharing !
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  4. #4
    This is cool!

    I did play both of the "final" versions (I bought the PS2 version of SC1 for that ONE level lol), but it's neat to see how they evolved.

    Originally Posted by LuckyBide Go to original post
    Even if we had parts of this level through the Kola Cell mission I wished we had the entire Severonickel mission, the level looks so huge and fun. I'm sad the outdoor snowy parts didn't end up in the Kola Cell mission, I love this type of atmosphere so much in SC.
    That version of Unreal wasn't particularly great for "outdoor" stuff (since it was only subtractive back then), so I'm not surprised we didn't see much of it. With interiors, it's not that difficult to design around cull distances, so the levels run better...so many hallways...
    With open spaces, it was just more difficult. I imagine the more advanced lighting in SC might not have helped, either...
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    LuckyBide's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally Posted by CoastalGirl Go to original post
    That version of Unreal wasn't particularly great for "outdoor" stuff (since it was only subtractive back then), so I'm not surprised we didn't see much of it. With interiors, it's not that difficult to design around cull distances, so the levels run better...so many hallways...
    With open spaces, it was just more difficult. I imagine the more advanced lighting in SC might not have helped, either...
    I'm not very connoisseur about game engines and technical possibilities but what do you mean by "only subtractive" ?
    We had some outdoor parts in SAR; police station, Chinese embassy and the CIA HQ missions offered some nice and interesting moments in outdoor environments. And it seems to me that PT used the same engine and we had some nice outdoor missions like Jerusalem, the US embassy and the jungle mission. To me Unreal Engine delivered a great job back then even if outdoor areas were quite linear and not that open as we wished. And by the way I love this mix between indoor and outdoor environments inside a same mission in the Splinter Cell series, I hope for the next game to have way more of them and make them more complex and more open.
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    Originally Posted by LuckyBide Go to original post
    I'm not very connoisseur about game engines and technical possibilities but what do you mean by "only subtractive" ?
    It's basically like you're starting with a giant block of clay - the world is completely solid. To make the level, you have to hollow it out. It works well for interiors because you can just subtract boxes and rectangles to make rooms and hallways. But for exteriors, you have to hollow out a huge area and then build up inside of it. Increasing the viewable area is great as a player, but the more you needed to engine to render at once, the more it started to cry. lol
    Later on, Unreal 3 let you make "additive" levels, which start empty like you'd expect (though subtractive levels were still an option). Now (Unreal 4/5), they're all additive.

    We had some outdoor parts in SAR; police station, Chinese embassy and the CIA HQ missions offered some nice and interesting moments in outdoor environments. And it seems to me that PT used the same engine and we had some nice outdoor missions like Jerusalem, the US embassy and the jungle mission. To me Unreal Engine delivered a great job back then even if outdoor areas were quite linear and not that open as we wished. And by the way I love this mix between indoor and outdoor environments inside a same mission in the Splinter Cell series, I hope for the next game to have way more of them and make them more complex and more open.
    Yeah, the outdoor areas were often designed much like interiors - narrow alleys, etc, were you couldn't actually see that far. Even when we could, the "horizon" was not actually that far away. But hey, they worked with what they had, and I still love those games.
    I also really like varied missions, too. The Bank was the best!
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    LuckyBide's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally Posted by CoastalGirl Go to original post
    It's basically like you're starting with a giant block of clay - the world is completely solid. To make the level, you have to hollow it out. It works well for interiors because you can just subtract boxes and rectangles to make rooms and hallways. But for exteriors, you have to hollow out a huge area and then build up inside of it. Increasing the viewable area is great as a player, but the more you needed to engine to render at once, the more it started to cry. lol
    Later on, Unreal 3 let you make "additive" levels, which start empty like you'd expect (though subtractive levels were still an option). Now (Unreal 4/5), they're all additive.
    Alright now I understand, I wasn't aware that old engines like Unreal Engine used subtractive technique and I think I can see why designing outdoor environments was harder.
    Thanks for taking the time to explain.

    Originally Posted by CoastalGirl Go to original post
    Yeah, the outdoor areas were often designed much like interiors - narrow alleys, etc, were you couldn't actually see that far. Even when we could, the "horizon" was not actually that far away. But hey, they worked with what they had, and I still love those games.
    I also really like varied missions, too. The Bank was the best!
    They definitely made a great work considering the technical limitations they had back then and in my opinion they nailed these outdoor missions.
    Though outdoor environments in Chaos Theory and Double Agent felt less linear and with a more distant "horizon", maybe it was due to Unreal Engine 2.5 ?
    Anyway in some ways I miss that old era because developers had to be more creative in order to hide and get around the technical limitations.
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  8. #8
    Originally Posted by LuckyBide Go to original post
    Alright now I understand, I wasn't aware that old engines like Unreal Engine used subtractive technique and I think I can see why designing outdoor environments was harder.
    Thanks for taking the time to explain.
    Happy to! I'm a nerd for this stuff.

    They definitely made a great work considering the technical limitations they had back then and in my opinion they nailed these outdoor missions.
    Though outdoor environments in Chaos Theory and Double Agent felt less linear and with a more distant "horizon", maybe it was due to Unreal Engine 2.5 ?
    Anyway in some ways I miss that old era because developers had to be more creative in order to hide and get around the technical limitations.
    I'm not sure how much Ubi's version of the engine changed between the first games (probably not much between SC and PT, more for CT), but I would guess that advancements in computer hardware in general probably helped, too.
    I agree with you, though, they definitely had to be creative back then. Sometimes the limitations actually helped, too. They couldn't render a ton at once, but having some reduced sight lines can help the tension. It's like the fog in Silent Hill. They needed it to keep the draw distance low, but what it did for the atmosphere was awesome.
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    LuckyBide's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally Posted by CoastalGirl Go to original post
    Happy to! I'm a nerd for this stuff.
    That's great to hear,Ubisoft needs you in a development team now

    Originally Posted by CoastalGirl Go to original post
    I'm not sure how much Ubi's version of the engine changed between the first games (probably not much between SC and PT, more for CT), but I would guess that advancements in computer hardware in general probably helped, too.
    I agree with you, though, they definitely had to be creative back then. Sometimes the limitations actually helped, too. They couldn't render a ton at once, but having some reduced sight lines can help the tension. It's like the fog in Silent Hill. They needed it to keep the draw distance low, but what it did for the atmosphere was awesome.
    That's true. I guess we would be really surprised to hear the amount of problems that technical limitations brought to devs back then on our favorite games and how they found solutions to bypass them. And in a way these solutions helped them as you mention it.
    Maybe the current and incoming shortages on electronic component will bring us back to that era, who knows haha
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    SCAgent95's Avatar Senior Member
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