1. #1
    First post here, just been reading until now. But I thought I would share something good.
    I was cleaning out my office and going through some past issues of some old aviation history magazines and I found this article. I looked for it online, but couldn€t find it, so I typed it out for you.
    Enjoy!

    Then and Tomorrow As part of our ongoing series comparing and contrasting today€s computer aviation simulations and games to their historical recollections, Mr. Heinz Halstrick, a Messerschmitt 109 pilot assigned to 16./JG5 during the later parts of Germany's involvement in WWII, was recently interviewed by our very own Brian Kremmings about his experiences in combat, and his exposure to one of today€s most popular WWII aviation computer simulations.
    Brian Kremmings: Guten Tag, Heir Halstrick. I am told that you have recently been exposed to the game IL-2 [Sturmovik series, from UbiSoft Entertainment and Maddox 1C development.].
    Heinz Halstrick: Hello to you. Ya, my grandson enjoys the aviation sims, and
    during a recent visit it was shown to me to try.
    B.K.: I'm sure our readers would be extremely interested in your thoughts compared to your relative experiences. Can you give us some background information on you and your flight experience?
    H.H.: I was raised in Efferen, near Cologne, and while at University was summoned to serve during the war. My aptitude was to be a pilot, which pleased me since I was fascinated with planes. I trained to fly at Wittenberge in July of 1944. In September I was charged to Jagdgeschwader 5 (IV./JG5). I stayed assigned to JG5 until the end of the war.
    B.K.: What aircraft did you fly?
    H.H.: Pilots were few for the fighter units, so our training was fast. I was taught on a Bücker [Bücker Bü 131], a basic bi-plane. Then moved right to the Messerschmitt-109 Gustav. Although I wanted to fly the Folke Wulf, there were few to be had, and my unit had only the 109. I am glad for the 109. It was a very wonderful fighter and quite deadly. In September I first flew the G6, but shortly after, we received our first G14s. They were much improved in the engine, and we carried the 3 centimeter cannon in the nose to fight the bombing raids. The 2 centimeter was preferred by the senior pilots with combat experience against fighters, but we were told the larger cannon was necessary in case we were to engage bombers. It was very deadly, so I did not complain. In February the staffel received the first Kurfürst, but I did not fly one, even though I wished to.
    B.K.: What combat experience do you have?
    H.H.: I shot thirteen aircraft. Five of those were the fortress bomber [B-17]. Four were the Lighting. [P-38]. Two were the Mustang [P-51], and two were the Thunder [P-47 Thunderbolt].
    B.K.: That is quite impressive! To what do you owe your success?
    H.H.: I don't consider them successes. I did not wish to kill the men, and do not know if I did. I was doing my duty in defending my fatherland. But there were many Americans in the sky. One merely had to surprise them from a good position. Sometimes we met on equal terms. In those cases, I believe my training in combat flying proved better. The pilots senior to me had taught us well. The enemy planes we met did not seem to understand how to fight well. But there were always more enemy aircraft than us, so you didn't fight for long. B.K.: Of course. So you have had some to experience Il-2. What are your impressions?
    H.H.: It is a game for the computer, but I found it quite enjoyable and true. At first, my grandson spent some time adjusting the controls to meet my memory of feel, but it is difficult to compare when sitting at a desk. The 109 seemed to respond quite well to the controls. I remember it turned quite well. We were always able to maker sharper turns than the big American planes. Especially the one with a twin boom . I did not understand why the enemy used that for fighter duty. It seemed to me it should have been used for spying or cargo. It was very fast, but the pilots would sometimes try to fight in them, which seemed foolish. They could not turn well, and dropped much speed when they turned. Their size made them easy to hit with my guns. It was an inferior airplane, so no challenge to win. But the fate of combat was something that could never be sure, so we were always careful. Often when we fought the enemy they would turn and run, not seeming to want to fight. I liked the G-14 because it had the power to catch them. The Mustang was not as fast as the G-14, so we could catch them unless other Mustangs prevented us. The Thunder [P-47 Thunderbolt] was large and fast, but many times the Americans would turn to fire on another aircraft, and we could fire on them. I did not shoot down a Spitfire, but had met with them. Luck favored one. As I was gaining a shot, he managed to find a cloud and hide. He could not turn well, and I had more engine power, so the combination would have been victorious, if not for the weather. The other times they just did not engage, which was smart, because it was known that the Spitfire was a poor design. We worried more of the Americans in their large packs more a Spitfire.
    On the computer it seemed the 109 turned less than how I remember its response, not much better than a Mustang, which was quite inaccurate. Speed was good. I do not remember the top speed, but I remember low flying at 500 kilometers per hour or more. It was a very exhilarating feeling. I found the guns to be somewhat accurate. The 3 centimeter cannon would do extensive damage, but several times I used my machine guns to damage the Americans. When I was playing I hit a Lightning in the wing. I saw the explosion from the shell, but the wing did not come off. A hit like that would have instantly removed the wing, so not seeing the damage was disappointing. I remember that a Mustang once gave me a good burst when I surprised from the sun. I dove to a cloud and did not see him again. After that flight I realized I had taken a number of bullets, but received little noticeable damage. I found it curious that the Americans would use such inferior weapons, but thanked fate that they were so. During my play a Mustang shot my aircraft. My grandson showed me a way to look outside the airplane, and the damage seemed heavy. Where there should have been little structure damage for many rounds, like rain drops, there were large holes. How were such holes made? Such is a game I suppose. Not real. I played once against a Spitfire. The way they turned and kept so fast astonished me. This was very wrong, I could only laugh. I told my grandson not to use that airplane again, because it was not correct.
    B.K.: How would you rate the realism of the game compared to your experiences?
    H.H.: It is, after all, a game, so it is hard to compare. I think a very fine job has been done for the 109 G-14. Much detail has been given to the cockpit as I remember it so. It performed much as I remember it. Quick and deadly, although it should turn better. Also, in the game the Mustang seemed much too fast and had too much in guns, and the Lightning turned more like a fighter, rather than like the bomber it was. The Spitfire came from imagination. Whoever added that performance to the game used fantasy. But as I said, it is a game, and treated as fun. I found it pleasurable to pretend to fly my lovely Messerschmitt once again. It brought me much joy.
    B.K.:I thank you very much for your time and your insight! It's been a great experience for me, and I€m sure my readers will be very appreciative

    - Brian Kremmings

    -----------------------------

    I searched for more information on Heinz Halstrick. Here is a photo of him next to his G-14.
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  2. #2
    WOLFMondo's Avatar Senior Member
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    An interesting take on things. Spitfire was a poor design, Mustang was slow and P38 was a **** dogfighter and he wanted the FW over the Messer. Contradicts even other German pilots.

    100% reason why pilot accounts are annecdotal and should be treated as stories only me thinks.
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  3. #3
    berg417448's Avatar Senior Member
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    Why do I smell fish?
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  4. #4
    georgeo76's Avatar Senior Member
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    I spoke w/ a German Pilot once who told me that a Mustang was hard to hit because it wobbled so much.
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  5. #5
    I liked the G-14 because it had the power to catch them.
    because it was known that the Spitfire was a poor design
    The 3 centimeter cannon would do extensive damage, but several times I used my machine guns to damage the Americans. When I was playing I hit a Lightning in the wing. I saw the explosion from the shell, but the wing did not come off. A hit like that would have instantly removed the wing, so not seeing the damage was disappointing.
    I played once against a Spitfire. The way they turned and kept so fast astonished me. This was very wrong, I could only laugh. I told my grandson not to use that airplane again, because it was not correct.

    Well, I don't give much on personal feelings on planes, but experience and what he says really makes you wonder about a few things...
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  6. #6
    lrrp22's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by berg417448:
    Why do I smell fish?
    Yep, a big ol' carp. He posted this a few months ago- it is a complete fabrication.

    Nice job though- hits all the hot buttons.
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  7. #7
    Originally posted by lrrp22:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
    Why do I smell fish?
    Yep, a big ol' carp. He posted this a few months ago- it is a complete fabrication.

    Nice job though- hits all the hot buttons. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    That is a dead giveaway
    not so good fishing attempt
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  8. #8
    Hristo_'s Avatar Senior Member
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    Someone call Bud Anderson quick !
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  9. #9
    Can you scan some pages from that article and post them?

    Thanks
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  10. #10
    1.JaVA_Hornet's Avatar Senior Member
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    Nice story from that great pilot.
    But...i have read in the past about
    spitfires and bf109`s and i have read
    other things then this great pilot writes now.

    So i am a little confused.
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