1. #1
    Supr's Avatar Senior Member
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    where is rbj when you need him?
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  2. #2
    Wow! I haven´t heard of him for ages!!! He made me laugh so much.
    I do have my pitch trim assigned to a slider. Works like a charm.
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  3. #3
    Yesterday I sat opp the trim on my X45 sliders.
    Spesiall my groundstraffings with BF110 improved
    Also on the P40 shoting down Jap bombers and Zeroes was haighly improved.
    The gunnery platfor is now much easier to aim exactly.
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  4. #4
    Since it's changed, I've not had any problem with 109 or P-38 compression. Basically went back to using trim as a secondary elevator like I did in IL-2.

    I really wish they'd have left it the other way. I don't want to use this exploit, but ignoring it would be a handicap.
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  5. #5
    what is "the other way"? I assume that the whole debate is that a pilot would never reach down and trim his aircraft while in the middle of a turning fight-right? i.e. -not- that trim can't add significant amounts of lift...
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  6. #6
    You´ll be surprised how trimming while dogfighting is useful...Especially pitch trim...tighter turns.
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  7. #7
    F19_Olli72's Avatar Senior Member
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    And thats why we'll have 109s & Mustangs turn like Gladiators. Really, if you want it that way, just fly on arcade servers please
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  8. #8
    Bearcat99's Avatar Senior Member
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    And use it they did... they used whatever they could manage to get to in the fury of trying to stay alive... they would have honked the horn if it had one and it would have effected the plane.... Bud Anderson said that they used trim.. but often stuff was happening so fast, your hands were flying all around the cockpit and you didnt think about it... you became one with the planeand if you wanted the plane to do something you did what you had to do to get it to do it but you also were aware of the limits because you knew to try to get it to do something it couldnt in a fight meant almost certain death.
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  9. #9
    F19_Olli72's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by Bearcat99:
    And use it they did... they used whatever they could manage to get to in the fury of trying to stay alive... they would have honked the horn if it had one and it would have effected the plane.... Bud Anderson said that they used trim.. but often stuff was happening so fast, your hands were flying all around the cockpit and you didnt think about it... you became one with the planeand if you wanted the plane to do something you did what you had to do to get it to do it but you also were aware of the limits because you knew to try to get it to do something it couldnt in a fight meant almost certain death.
    No offense Bearcat, but try this: in qmb start a 109 at 3000 m and make a dive at approx. 45 degrees. Let speed build up to about 680 - 700 km/h.

    Now, pull back fully on the stick and trim and the same time. That simply could not be done in reality due to physical limitation of the pilot. At those speeds in 109 you needed both hands to pull the stick, what a finnish pilot had to do is alternate by pulling with both hands and let go with one had and trim then pull with both hands again etc.

    So no, i dont think its realistic in FB.
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  10. #10
    Right-on Bear...anybody who doesn't think trim was used in dogfights, has never flown real aircraft, and needs to do his research.

    Here is a quote from Chapter 1 of Clarence "Bud" Anderson's To Fly and Fight. This is the chapter where he discribes the most intense turning dogfight of his life, against a Bf-109:

    "Any airplane with a single propeller produces torque. The more horsepower you have, the more the prop will pull you off to one side. The Mustangs I flew used a 12-cylinder Packard Merlin engine that displaced 1,649 cubic inches. That is 10 times the size of the engine that powers an Indy car. It developed power enough that you never applied full power sitting still on the ground because it would pull the tail up off the runway and the propellor would chew up the concrete. With so much power, you were continually making minor adjustments on the controls to keep the Mustang and its wing-mounted guns pointing straight.

    There were three little palm-sized wheels you had to keep fiddling with. They trimmed you up for hands-off level flight. One for the little trim tab on the tail rudder, the vertical slab which moves the plane left or right. Another adjusted the tab on the tail's horizontal elevators that raise or lower the nose and help reduce the force you had to apply for hard turning. The third was for aileron trim, to keep your wings level, although you didn't have to fuss much with that one. Your left hand was down there a lot if you were changing speeds, as in combat...while at the same time you were making minor adjustments with your feet on the rudder pedals and your hand on the stick. At first it was awkward. But with experience, it was something you did without thinking. like driving a car and twirling the radio dial."
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