1. #21
    Originally posted by Von_Rat:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by thefruitbat:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Breeze147:
    A study should be done on how many Brits between the ages of 65 and 61 are half-American.


    J/K oops didn't mean it don't get upset keep your knickers straight bangers and mash bangers and mash wink wink
    One would be my mum, American airman, who unsuprisingly returned back home, my mum was put up for adoption. I guess that happened a fair amount. The legacy is, that it's a constant effort for me, to try to stop myself eating burgers.... genes eh!

    cheers fruitbat </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    i tease my dad who was with the 8th af and had several brit girlfriends, that i must have a few half brothers or sisters over there. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I guess my 'real' grandfather got past the yellow teeth. Or he got to like warm beer...

    By the way, whats the state of affairs of the family estate

    fruitbat
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  2. #22
    lier You have both on DVD, i know!
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  3. #23
    Originally posted by jadger:
    [...]whereas the Americans rarely fall on-screen. [...]It all comes down to an American viewership not willing to see their own boys killed on screen as much as some anonymous and faceless enemy.
    Why is it I can readily think of many war movies that depict Americans falling on screen then? SPR, Flags of our Fathers/Letters from Iwo Jima, Platoon, Full Metal Jacket for starters.

    Where have you gotten your ideas on what is acceptable to an American viewership?
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  4. #24
    Well I've tossed the odd grenade, seen em' go off too and if there is one thing that Hollywood has gotten seriously wrong, its the explosion of a grenade. They are so over-modelled it aint funny.

    A typical grenades explosion, the first time you see it, is a big disappointment. I'd liken it to someone letting off a big firecracker in a pillow case full of dust.
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  5. #25
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by Messaschnitzel:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by leitmotiv:

    and the soldiers of the Philippines army are practically forgotten.
    There is a very large Filipino American population living in Northern CA. I have met or worked with a good number of WW2 vets that served alongside the U.S. troops during that time. One thing that the Filipinos still resent is that their common enemy Japan, received more help and money to rebuild their country from the U.S. than the Philippines did after the war.

    The Filipinos have a very strong sense of extended family that is constantly emphasized. You are expected to support and be supported by this network at all times. This is called "utang na loob" in Tagalog, which roughly translates to "obligation to the family". This is why the Filipinos were such reliable and effective allies during the war because they considered the U.S. to be part of the "family".

    Imagine that your friend, with whom you fought alongside with in a hard won fight would move in the aftermath to help the opposing guys first with their wounds before giving you less attention than the opponents received.

    If there are any people that can immediately fit in and become "Americans", it is the Filipinos. English is taught from grades 2-12. Add to that a good, effective education, and you have a productive and patriotic potential citizen.

    As a side note, if you wish to study the Filipino martial arts, then the Bay Area of N. Ca., and also S. CA. are a good place look because of the long time Filipino American presence. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I grew up in Stockton which had a big Filipino presence---it was impossible to not know people who had been in the defense of the Philippines. I also knew an American who was in the Philippines with the Grace Line who refused to leave and stayed doing logistics for the defenders until captured. He and the other civilians at Santo Tomas would have been executed by the Japanese in 1945 had it not been for brave Filipinos who got the news of the impending massacre to the American army. The prisoners at Santo Tomas were rescued literally at the last moment. That man, Frank Woodruff Buckles, is now the last ambulatory U.S. WWI vet.
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  6. #26
    On an aside,

    I know most people dont seem to like it, but for me, I have always found one scene in 'the thin red line' that stands out above nearly everything i have seen on film. It is the moment where they (US) attack the village out of the fog, I think its probally the most emotive desription of war, that i have seen on film. The horror is shown on so many levels, from different viewpoints.

    But of course thats totally subjective, my opinion.

    Luckily, i have never been in combat, but what i am sure of, as most of you will be too, from reading etc... is that there is no such thing as just combat. It is different depending on the individuals, platoon to platoon, company to company. Subjective i guess.

    fruitbat
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  7. #27
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    There are some good scenes in that film---the one I've always liked was when the Americans are pinned down on the elevation below the Japanese hilltop bunker. Malick, unlike Spielberg and all the Hollywood types, understood war is not all frenzied action. He captured the beauty and the dread of the situation wonderfully. Too bad much of the film was wondrously silly---I still can't believe how the man who directed a masterpiece like DAYS OF HEAVEN could have screwed the pooch so eloquently in THIN RED.

    Another great U.S. film about war is this TV film from 2001:

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0287535/
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  8. #28
    zardozid's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by jadger:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by jadger:
    is this one gonna have magic grenades like BOB where an American can dive two feet from a grenade and not get injured, and Germans (this one Japanese) fall like preteen girls at a Justin Timberlake concert.
    eh?

    How many grenades have you had thrown at you. i actually read one account where a grenade blew up right next to a GI in Somalia (I think it was) black hawk down and didn`t touch him. Sometimes, if you`re lucky (you`re low, the grenade blows in a slight ditch or some such) it can go off right next to you and evrything flies over head.

    How are soldiers supoosed to fall when shot. Do German soldiers fall differently to allied?

    A rather spiteful little post, I think. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    by falling like girls at a Justin Timberlake concert, I meant they all fall in rather quick succession, whereas the Americans rarely fall on-screen. Indeed the biggest character kill-off in BoB is when they did the whole uniform cleaner thing. It all comes down to an American viewership not willing to see their own boys killed on screen as much as some anonymous and faceless enemy.

    and I was referring to one scene where the yankee GI is on his knees in a trench and a grenade lands right beside him, he dives away 2 feet away and isn't injured.

    If you want a real war movie, watch der Untergang, now that shows more realistic combat than anything that can come out of hollywood. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


    Did we see that same edit of BoB (LOL)?

    I remember one episode where a (American) soldier is killed by his own grenade...the scene is that a group of soldier are assaulting a farm house, the soldier throws a grenade through a window then enters the room shooting before the explosion goes off...BAMM, fatally injured by his own grenade...Bleeding, screaming, crying...very messy and not very "Hollywood Heroic" (just human).

    I thought the series did a "fair job" of portraying what these guys must have gone thru... I think you must have watched "BoB" thru biased eyes because their was quite a bit of blood shed on both sides of that story...

    The story follows a specific group (based on real people) of soldiers through their experiences in WW2...by the end of the series you are left with less then half of the original cast.
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  9. #29
    leitmotiv's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally posted by Bo_Nidle:
    I don't think it will be confined to the late Pacific. I have seen other photos showing actors in early marine kit with Springfield '03 rifles and no helmet covers riding in standard landing-craft as well as other pictures showing them with M1 Garands and helmet covers in LVT's.

    Besides that, if anyone can name a better TV series covering WW2 US soldiers than BoB I'd like to know.
    Alas, that film had about zilch to do with Americans at war. It was focused through the distorted lens of Stephen Ambrose's ideas about American character---which were, at best, unbelievably idealistic, and, at the worst, sanctimonious and self-regarding to the point of nausea. A film like 1943's BATAAN has more depth about Americans at war than B OF BROS or RYAN. B OF BROS was overlaid with so much maudlin sentiment, I was, frankly, embarrassed by it. Compared to the hard-edged, bitter realism of novels like THE THIN RED LINE, or the ironic brilliance of the novel CATCH-22, B OF BROS and RYAN are precious Hollywood fantasies mixed with frenzied video game action, and requisite blood. I grew up around American WWII veterans and they were not the bags of sensibility those characters were in B OF BROS. Most of them were very ironic about their experiences in the war. Many were still hard as nails from the war. Many were bitter. At least one, a soldier in Italy who operated behind German lines, and had to shoot dozens of Italian civilians suspected of being fascists was bitter and enraged. There is a depth of experience that the simple matrix of Ambrose (Americans good/Germans evil) cannot tolerate, and for this reason I can't abide B OF BROS, and advise anybody from the rest of the world to regard the film with deep skepticism. I have no optimism anything coming from the Spielberg/Hanks schlock mill will be any better than the previous essays.
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  10. #30
    Band of Brothers was absolutely wonderful, to no small extent to its real life roots and the producers respect for history. Based on it, I absolutely waiting for 'The Pacific'; the theatre was always a bit of stepchild for me. I wonder if there`s a decent movie made from 'The Naked and the Dead'? Would make some excellent base material for an expert hand IMHO.

    ... SPR was otoh, typical Spielberg commercial **** with zero realism, and primitive 'moral lessons' and Hollywood hype&taunts... the greatest challange watching that POS is to pick the most emberassing scene out of the many.. is it the toss-back-the-nade-on-the-stormtroops, or was it the I-didnt-use-that-am-gee-hitlerkaputt.. or perhaps the foul-crying-hand-picked-nazifaced jerries behin` the walls..? It`s just awful, every part of it.
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