1. #1
    What aircraft was nicknamed "The poor man's Mustang" ?
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  2. #2
    What aircraft was nicknamed "The poor man's Mustang" ?
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  3. #3
    M_Gunz's Avatar Banned
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    Mar 2007
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    AT-6?
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  4. #4
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M_Gunz:
    AT-6? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    No, but a good quess buddy.
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  5. #5
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The poor man's Mustang </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

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  6. #6
    Nice picture but no.
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  7. #7
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  8. #8
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
    http://www.midwestnavioneers.org/navinfo.htm </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I betcha you googled it..
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  9. #9
    http://www.highlandlakessquadron.com/l_17.html

    The story of the Ryan Nivian is really fascinating btw.

    At the end of WW-II North American Aviation resumed manufacturing civilian aircraft, and the NA-145 Navion, nicknamed "the poor man's Mustang", was its first post-war product. It first flew in April 1946. The Army Air Forces ordered 83 military versions under the designation L-17A. It was procured 'off-the-shelf' from among all U.S. four-place aircraft with no special expenditure for a new design.








    There are still a lot flyng btw and are quite a bargan for what you get.

    I have seen a few of these up close and they do look a lot like like a civilianized Mustang.

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  10. #10
    hmm, i was thinking of any allison engined Mustang

    fruitbat
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