1. #1
    I'm sure not many will have personal stories but here's one about my Grandfather.

    Basically he missed Dunkirk. He was in the RAF and arrived after the last boat left. So there they are looking at the last loads disappearing into the distance and with the German army on the other side. So they decide to turn the truck and leg it as fast as possible to Le Havre. I don't know much more than that but they must have arrived as he certainly got back to England and survived the war intact.

    Now over to you you must have some good stories.
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  2. #2
    I'm sure not many will have personal stories but here's one about my Grandfather.

    Basically he missed Dunkirk. He was in the RAF and arrived after the last boat left. So there they are looking at the last loads disappearing into the distance and with the German army on the other side. So they decide to turn the truck and leg it as fast as possible to Le Havre. I don't know much more than that but they must have arrived as he certainly got back to England and survived the war intact.

    Now over to you you must have some good stories.
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  3. #3
    My great uncle was a tail gunner on a B-25 in Italy and Burma. He flew 52 mission's in these two theater's. He told me how when he returned from some mission's he'd find machine gun bullet's and bullet holes in his flight suit. Talked like this was just a part of the job.
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  4. #4
    My grandfather was on Guam after it had been taken, working with the Sea Bees running powerlines across the island. It was fairly common for Japanese diehards to hide in the jungles, waging one man guerilla wars for years after hostilities ceased. So one night while my grandfather and some of the other guys were showering, one of these Japanese guerillas opened fire on the facilities. The only guy unfortunate enough to be shot got it in the butt. He ran squealing, soapy, and naked all the way back to camp. I think it's a funny if you were there and only after the fact story, but it was my grandfather's and I'll always remember it.
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  5. #5
    Inadaze's Avatar Senior Member
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    I know an old guy who was a rigger (I think, with 222 Squadron throughout the war from the Battle of Britain onwards.

    Later in the war they got Tempests, one of his mates was test flying a machine they had been fixing. The pilots family had come to the airbase to visit, so he decided to do a roll to excite the kids. Unfortunately they had just changed from Spits and the guy wasn't used to the aircraft. He ended up rolling into the deck infront of his family...

    My best mates Grandad was a mechanic in the RAF, he told me a story about a Polish test pilot they had. This guy wasn't allowed in a combat unit because he was almost suicidal trying to kill Germans. His whole family had been killed when Poland was invaded.

    I'm not sure what they were testing, it was something twin engined though. He said he knew something was up with the pilot when he lit up a cigarette as soon as they were on the runway, then proceeded to take off only using the trim. The flight ended up with them flying down Princess Street in Edinburgh. he reckoned they were so low at times he was looking up at the rooftops!

    His comment was "He was as mad as a fish, but the best pilot he had ever flown with..."

    ~Inadaze
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  6. #6
    My grandad was with the US Army 24th infantry division in the Pacific. He was one of only a handful in his company to survive.

    One of the funny stories he tells is of being strafed by a Japanese Zero fighter. I asked him if he was afraid and he said no, because he could always out turn the Zero

    Alot of the other stuff I could tell would probably be pretty offensive to some members of this forum.

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  7. #7
    I've thought about posting a topic like this in the past but wasn't sure how it would be received, but since you've done it for me, here goes.

    I'm an American, but my Mom and Dad are German from the old country, and they both went through the war. My Dad a young teenage draftee in the German army, and my Mom not quite a teenage girl at the time. My aunt's husband was in the U-Boots. My Dad's younger brother was in an anti-aircraft unit. His two older brothers in the army both died on the Eastern Front. One somewhere in East Prussia, the other was MIA in Poland. I'd like to find out what happened to them. From what I understand, and I'm not sure which one was where, they served in the Stalingrad and Leningrad sectors for a time. Lost a lot of other relatives too but that's irrelevant.

    My parents didn't talk too much about the war, except to tell us how horrible it was, but I do remember a few of the stories they told, so here goes. My Mom's most memorable story usually involves the bombings. She lived in the small village of Hagsfeld on the outskirts of Karlsruhe. One night the bombs strayed over the village and set my Grandma's barn on fire. They rushed into the burning barn and tried to save as many animals as they could. Grandma was also reported to have disposed of a small incendiary device (I believe it was actually burning at the time) that had landed in my Mom's bedroom during the raid, and threw it out the window without thinking of the consequences.

    Dad was stationed in France in Normandy. On occasion he had to observe and report on the V-1's flying toward England, to make sure they were safely on their way to their target. He also talks about there being a great deal of confusion during the landings. One of the stories he tells is about one of the guys in his platoon grabbing three or four Panzerfausts, and going after some allied tanks, where he single handedly knocked out several of them. My favorite story of his is about the time his platoon was on patrol or a scouting mission somewhere in the forest. It goes something like this. They were in the woods when a jeep with a couple of GI's came along the road and stopped near them. I don't know if they were lost or not. Anyway, all of a sudden the Americans noticed them. However both sides were so frightened of each other and in shock that they just starred at each other for a few tense moments. The Americans seeing they were outnumbered decided to make a run for it and left the jeep. The Germans simply relieved that nothing had happened didn't pursue the Americans but did take their jeep

    Hope you enjoyed some of what I've told you. I know war isn't fun or pretty, but sometimes it can have some amusing aspects to it.
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  8. #8
    my grandfather (mothers side) lost an arm, a leg, his nose and one ear at monte casino. he survived just to die soon after of cancer. ironic, isnt it.
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  9. #9
    Chuck_Older's Avatar Banned
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    My grand-dad was an air raid warden. My Dad recalls seeing a glow to the east on the shore of Cape Cod at night(I live in Massachusetts, US), and finding out later that it was a burning oil tanker, adrift after being torpedoed. I have an uncle by marriage who was a US submariner, made several war patrols but he never talks about it.

    *****************************
    the sergeant will for, his sergeant's pay, obey the captain 'till his dying day~ Clash
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  10. #10
    PBNA-Boosher's Avatar Senior Member
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    Oddly enough, my grandfather was an airman, a radio operator in a B-17 and he served in both New Guinea and in Europe. He had a combined total of 55 or so missions to his credit. 25 in New Guinea, and the others out in Europe.

    He wasn't much of an achievement in the air. He did his job fine, but he couldn't hit jack squat with his gun in the air. He was wounded three times, twice in the stomach, and another right in the chest, leaving him with 3 purple hearts. Also, when the Japanese invaded his island airbase, he was one of the the first on the scene and was shooting and snapping necks left and right. He ended up snapping 7 Japanese necks and wounding many others with his pistol before a Jap soldier finally decided that my Grandad was causing a bit too much trouble for them. It was at this time when he recieved one of his stomach wounds. Luckily it didn't go too deep, but it was sufficient enough to keep him out of combat for a few weeks.

    Another thing he did when in Europe was when he and his crew were shot down on the Front lines, he used his pistol to kill the officers in the German Patrol which was sent to get them. This action sent the German regular combat troops confused, and also enabled him to get his crew to safety. I remember meeting his pilot a few years before he died, and the pilot said, "Your grandaddy saved my arse in WW2!" He recieved either the DFC or the Silver Star for this, I think. I have one of his Purple hearts.
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