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  1. #1
    Gold_Jim's Avatar Senior Member
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    HNPD Boss ME-80

    Yesterday, as I struggled to lug my 60 lbs of pedals to my car, out of my car, into rehearsal, back out of rehearsal, back to the house, I realized it was time to shrink it all down. I took the whole thing to GC and traded it all for a Boss ME-80.

    I stayed clear of these in the early 2000's, because they were a pain to program. Now, you download software and control them with an interface. There also used to be complicated menu and manipulation. Just turning on/off delay, OD, etc was a pain. This bank, that setting, etc. The COSM technology has improved greatly as well. Stock photos as I have to get home and take it out of the package today.



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  2. #2
    rcole_sooner's Avatar Moderator
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    You'll have to do a review of if, once you settled into it a bit.
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  3. #3
    The_Working_Man's Avatar Senior Member
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    That's a lot of knobs. Enjoy!
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  4. #4
    You should call her

    Knobby!
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  5. #5
    Gold_Jim's Avatar Senior Member
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    So last night, I did some playing around with the pedal connected to my computer and using the software. As is typical with multi-effects, the presets were mostly garbage, but they show how some of the cool and funky ways you can play the effects. Atypically, the pedal allows for a chain of 8 effects, which is 4 more than many pedals in this price range. After watching a few metal, fusion, and funk players show off their patches on YouTube, then checking Facebook (who doesn't?), and making sure my Words with Friends games were caught up, it was time to get back to the task at hand.

    I wasn't really sure how to get the tones from Boss's Tone Central site. Every time I hit download, I was taken to the site that allowed me to download the interface software. What I finally figured out (because I don't read instruction books) was that I clicked the Tone Central icon in the application, and that took me to download the same options, but I finally had an "Add" button at the bottom of the screen. Yeah me! What I found out as I clicked add on individual tones was that you really only needed to click it once and it downloaded the whole library (e.g. Guthrie Govan). I only wanted individual settings (e.g. Clean Acoustic Guitar). After deleting all of the duplicates, I took to dragging them from my library onto the pedal. This was easy. You can't overwrite the presets, so you won't ever lose the tones that came withe pedal. I didn't try to modify them and then save them, but there are 36 user presets, and that's more than enough for me. There was a time when I thought that I wanted one for every song, but that became hard to handle, and when it came time to switch up the set list, it was always a mess anyway.

    I forgot to mention that this thing did NOT come with a power supply! That was a down-tick for me. I had to spend another $30 on a Boss PSA power supply, because I didn't want my warranty voided. I wasn't going to be sticking six brand new AA batteries into this thing every time I played. I don't need my pedal dying during a gig or rehearsal. I guess to maintain the $299 price point, they couldn't throw a power supply in the box. It is included in the $499 model... Moving right along...

    Adding and patches was as easy as dragging and dropping. By clicking on the patch name, I was able to see and change all of the controls easily. I didn't find an "undo" button so I could quickly un-botch a setting, but I may have missed it. I didn't try control-Z, nor did I look too hard.

    I found many of the clean patches were louder than the distorted tones. I made some changes on levels and started messing with tone, compression, stomp box choices and within a few minutes, I had some useful tones in first few user defined patches. I did some messing around with manual controls, but it was getting late. I hope to do a YouTube video over the weekend. The big thing will be to have some useful user presets, manual control, switching it off on the fly, and find the best settings for individual songs. I also want to try putting the pedal into the effects loop on my amp.
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  6. #6
    randomas's Avatar Senior Member
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    That was the multi I was after when I ended up getting the zoom g3x. It's main selling point is lots of pedals!

    If you've just purchased it, aren't in it for the number of pedals and still can, you may want to trade it back in for for a GT1 that has the same chipset and modelling as the flagship gt100 is easier to use and comes in at about 200$. I know that's what I'm gassing for.

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  7. #7
    Gold_Jim's Avatar Senior Member
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    I considered it, but you have to understand that I'm actually gigging this thing. It's gotta be able to stand up to my feet. With 8 switches, in manual mode, the ME-80 allows for on/off of the overdrive/distortion/fuzz, pre-amp/amp modeling, modulation effects, EQ, reverb, delay, and the pedal. I can also set up each of these manually with the knobs without having to go through the interface. If it wasn't for the easy access to the knobs and quick changes I can do, the GT1 would have been my choice, especially @ $100 cheaper! I'm really looking to treat the ME-80 as a pedal board with 8 pedals (8 standard and the expression) in manual mode.
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  8. #8
    dspzp's Avatar Junior Member
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    Disclaimer: I am the worlds worst guitarist.

    But I got one of these for going to play with friends around the area. I let a friend borrow it, he is what I would call an accomplished musician, and he had the same observations as PRS_Rocker. He didn't like the presets, but after adjusting them he was happy with them. We are going to spend some time with it shortly, so I am looking forward to that.

    When I bought mine the salesman (owner) at the shop said "You need a power supply." I just looked at him awkwardly, and he threw a Boss power supply in. Nice to shop local.

    I look forward to the video PRS.
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  9. #9
    Kynlore's Avatar Senior Member
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    That is a really nice board. I know what you mean about the presets. My Marshall Code has 100 presets and only about 20 were keepers.
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  10. #10
    Gold_Jim's Avatar Senior Member
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    So last night was another evening of dialing in. Using my Les Paul Tribute into the board, I proceeded to try using the effects loop on my amp, so from the amp effects send to the guitar input and return back to the amp from the mono out of the ME-80. I found it was easier to tame the output of my 490R/T humbuckers with some minor tweaks for the levels. I used the compressor as a clean boost, the pre-amp to give me some drive and the overdrive section to provide even more. I used the amp's own built in reverb and created a chorus setting for acoustic simulation. The expression pedal acts as a vol pedal unless engaged, which is kind of a neat feature. Like most wah pedals, unless it's turned on by pushing all the way forward and activating a switch, the pedal defaults to volume. This came in handy when I switched to my Traditional Les Paul with classic 59 humbuckers.
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