1. #1
    I just tested the The Ta152 regarding overheating and it's actually amazing what this plane can do.

    It can fly until it runs out of fuel on 99% throttle with the radiator closed.

    It only overheats when you engage the booster or fly on 110% for a while and the only thing you have to do is trottle down for a few seconds and the overheat message is gone.
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  2. #2
    I just tested the The Ta152 regarding overheating and it's actually amazing what this plane can do.

    It can fly until it runs out of fuel on 99% throttle with the radiator closed.

    It only overheats when you engage the booster or fly on 110% for a while and the only thing you have to do is trottle down for a few seconds and the overheat message is gone.
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  3. #3
    You got my support Cappadocian, Hang in there!

    SeaFireLIV...


    Soon... Very soon....
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  4. #4
    Capp, I think Oleg said something to the effect that between the Dora and Ta-152 one was overheating too fast on auto and one was overheating too slowly. He wouldn't say which. Anyway, this gives an indication that the overheat times for those planes are being examined. I just hope he looks at the La-5's also, is there a reason that they take such a long time to overheat, even with boost on, 110% throttle, and radiator closed. It is just silly. Haven't checked in AEP yet but I will tonight, though I doubt it was changed the La's have always ignored heat for the most part. Spitfire also has overheat issues IMO, but I may be wrong (too long to overheat, too hard to get rid of heat).



    Formerly Kyrule2
    http://www.jg51.com/
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  5. #5
    I think it would be wise to overlook all the planes regarding overheating and engine cooling, as I suggested in the first place.

    I bet if we all started testing more planes we will have a longer list then just the Ta, La's and the Spits.
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  6. #6
    robban75's Avatar Senior Member
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    When doing the climbtests I've noticed that the planes less prone to overheating is the La-7 and La-5. The La-5 didn't overheat at all.



    When it comes to aircombat, I'd rather be lucky than good any day!
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  7. #7
    I agree Capp, overheat times are one of my major gripes with this sim. The La-5 not overheating is completely wrong IMO and I can't believe it has not been addressed. The La-5 ('42) already has ridiculous speed numbers at sea-level, and with no overheat its even worse.



    Formerly Kyrule2
    http://www.jg51.com/
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  8. #8
    Ta-152 could fly at max setting for half and hour, that's in the manual.
    If you were talking about all the planes you should have picked Spitfire. Ta-152 is a very poorly choosen example. It really could run forever at the highest settings - for example it could fly at climb and combat setting (military setting) without limit, whereas planes like P-51, P-47, P-40 and others could maintain it for 5 minutes only.

    [This message was edited by crazyivan1970 on Tue March 16 2004 at 02:46 PM.]
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  9. #9
    "If you were talking about all the planes you should have picked Spitfire"

    Huck, we already agreed that the Spits needed to be looked at so I see no reason to open another topic about that subject.

    "Ta-152 is a very poorly choosen example. It really could run forever at the highest settings - for example it could fly at climb and combat setting (military setting) without limit"

    With the cowl flaps closed?

    Forever?

    Highest settings?

    Without limit?

    I find that very hard to believe since all piston engines need cooling at some point.
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  10. #10
    Considering the poor quality of LW engines componet construction at the end of the war, and poor workmanship from forced labour at the componet factories, I doubt very much any LW fighters engine could run to spec, much less an indefinite run at full power.

    Ie, JG 26's operational D-9s were blowing oil lines etc, just running up their engines for takeoff , the lines could not withstand the pressure.

    Other componets also let go from stress that never would have occured in 1942 - 1943 due to higher QC standards, and factory acceptance tests, but in mid late 1944 the lack of fuel etc, prevented normal testsing of finished AC so operational units got to do the testing on combat sorties.

    Regards, John Waters

    ---------
    Notice: Spelling mistakes left in for people who need to correct others to make their life fulfilled.

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    "We've got the finest tanks in the world. We just love to see the German Royal Tiger come up on the field".

    Lt.Gen. George S. Patton, Jr. Febuary 1945.
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