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  1. #11
    The_Working_Man's Avatar Senior Member
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    Another resource:

    Guitarist's Guide To Scales Over Chords-The Foundation Of Melodic Guitar Soloing
    http://www.amazon.com/Guitarists-Cho...ng+over+scales

    Let us know how the lessons go!
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  2. #12
    The_Lexx's Avatar Member
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    Originally Posted by sh1kamaru- Go to original post
    Well, expressivity is not just about notes, it’s not even about the order you play them, you also need to find ways to link them together so it tells something. For instance, if you go up and down the neck as PRS suggested, you’ve got opportunities to add slides. You can play a note straight or you can apply vibrato to it, or you can exaggerate that vibrato and oscillate between the note and the note a half step or a whole step above. You can play legato or pick every single note, mix both. You can palm mute the note, add dead notes that have no particular pitch but that will have a percussive effect to build a rhythm. You can alternate between quarter, 8th, 16th notes. You can add natural harmonics, pinch harmonics… From there it’s easy to go from bluesy to metal,

    If you already know your pentatonic scales, then you can try those things. From there you can easily add notes that aren’t in the pentatonic scale. None of them would be wrong, it would just give a different taste to what you’re playing. From there it’s easy to go from bluesy to funky.

    Play with your dynamics, pick a few notes lightly, and emphasize one particular note by getting harder into the string.

    You could almost play a whole song with just one note, and play it differently every time.

    See this:


    I find it remarkable that both guys can vary the sounds so much. I've never seen a bass used like a lead guitar before! I'm starting to see that the freedom in playing music exists through theory. I think these guys have spent years understanding music and that allows them to do anything.

    @The_Working_Man. Looks good. Cheers.
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  3. #13
    Gold_Jim's Avatar Senior Member
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    Everything you experience, whether through learning or lessons, will either be implemented, modified, or forgotten over the years. All this theory stuff is just that - theory. It's not rules. Any guitar player that's been playing for a while will tell you that they make mistakes. It's what you do with those mistakes that shows your ability to adapt and keep moving. Don't just apply rules, learn them and then learn how you can play 'wrong' and play 'right'.

    Look at it like a toolbox and you're a sculptor. You have a pile of clay, a block of wood, a chunk of ice... Each of them has their own unique reactions to the tools you use and it's up to you to decide which is best in which application.
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  4. #14
    I'll offer a differing opinion about modes at this point. I really think you should learn some tunes that incorporate the scales you already know to build up your vocabulary. There are so many tunes out there that use the scale, you'll never learn them all. Learn some popular solos that definitely use it like Comfortably numb, Hotel california, November rain etc. I mean Gilmour, Slash, Hammett, and almost any tune on classic rock radio will use mostly the pentatonic scale, and a lot of them will use one position! Also pay attention to what chords they are using over which notes, as it will help you learn what notes to land on. I really really urge you not to get too deep into modes at this point if you are looking at building a vocabulary. To make an analogy, learning a new scale is like learning the definition of a word. Yeah you know what the word means, but can you use it in conversation? Could you type a paragraph using that word in a way it's impactful and meaningful? Using Truefire like someone posted is also a great idea, but focus on pentatonic licks. Some artists will using other tones that imply a mode of some sort, but for the most part things like Metallicas Unforgiven and Nothing else matters are mostly pentatonic. Also so many vocal melodies use the notes of the pentatonic scale. It's not that I don't think you could learn the modes and what chords they go over, but learn what the sound is for pentatonic first. Learn what it sounds like over certain chords and what certain notes sound like over the chord. If you truely master the pentatonic scale learning what makes each mode will be soooo much easier. You'll be able to hear "ok so these are the 5 notes in pentatonic and now I add this ONE note to give it a flavor of (insert mode name here). So often I feel like we as guitar players want to buy a new piece of gear, learn a new scale, learn a new chord in hopes that we will unlock the secret to playing. In reality, almost all of us need to develop our ear, lick vocabulary, to hearing what is "right" so to speak.
    It's great that you learned the 5 positions, but if you can't play something musically, what's the point ya know? It's like having the best car in a race, but it's no good if you don't know how to handle it. learn licks,solos, etc and then try to use those licks you learned as YOUR OWN. experiment with different not groupings and make sure you are playing in time.

    Now if you wanted to learn the major scales, I cannot fault you as it's pretty much a must for anyone learning about theory to learn about chord progressions. Don't get too caught up on the modes of those major scales just yet. Walk before you can run and all of that.


    PRS ROcker hit the nail on the head so hard in his previous post
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  5. #15
    Originally Posted by The_Lexx Go to original post
    I find it remarkable that both guys can vary the sounds so much. I've never seen a bass used like a lead guitar before! I'm starting to see that the freedom in playing music exists through theory. I think these guys have spent years understanding music and that allows them to do anything.

    @The_Working_Man. Looks good. Cheers.
    I'll respond to this observation by saying that in order to be a good musician you not only have to know some theory, whether consciously or unconsciously, YOU HAVE TO HAVE GOOD RHYTHM. I know that some guitarists get high and mighty and say "yeah I never learned to read music" I'm not saying you do, because in rock it's not sure helpful if that's your goal. But the best guitar players are guys that can play drums or piano(by sight reading). They have mastered most note groupings and can just know what rhythm+notes will sound good over a tempo. Again it ALL comes back to your ear.
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  6. #16
    The_Working_Man's Avatar Senior Member
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    Originally Posted by extendedsolo Go to original post
    I'll offer a differing opinion about modes at this point. I really think you should learn some tunes that incorporate the scales you already know to build up your vocabulary.
    That was my thinking when I created this thread: http://forums.ubi.com/showthread.php...light=learning but there didn't seem to be much interest. It would be really handy if the key for each song could be easily identified so like songs could be learned/played together to reinforce the commonality and be able to note the deviations from the implied patterns.
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  7. #17
    Originally Posted by The_Lexx Go to original post
    I've booked myself in for a 5 week course on the Fundamentals of Music Theory.
    This course is ON! It has just open a couple of days ago.
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  8. #18
    thanks for sharing that video, it was really useful. i am recently working on a sound mixing project on eduhelphub using this app, check out some of the sample tracks that i recently produced
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