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View Full Version : OLEG DEDICATED SERVER TICKRATE PLEASE------------ Now with Pictures!!



Protos_335TH_GR
04-10-2004, 07:39 PM
Ok lets try this again, here is what I mean by tickrate and netspeed.


I hope by graphically illustrating my question that I will enable the reader to understand what I am asking. I am interested in creating a really KICK *** Dedicated Server for the 335th Greek Squadron and the AEP community at large. To do this I need to find ways of properly configuring the server to my hardware specs. I would like to have and plan on having a server running a 60 Tickrate with a 10,000 netspeed cap. THAT WILL BE LAN QUALITY.


Now who can tell me where tickrate is in Dedicated Server? OLEG??????!!!



Introduction

What is Tickrate?

What effect does it have in Online games

First of all. Higher tickrate does not improve ping. Very common misconception. What it ACTUALLY does, is to reduce the time between each time the server handles incoming data, and sends out new data. So let me explain it in more complex terms.

By first explaining what tickrate actually is, I hope to have made you so confused you will believe the rest of the things I write in this document.

Tickrate is actually VERY VERY COMPLEX! It is the "Frames Pr Second" the server is running at. Yes, it is so complex. A tickrate of 20 means that the server is doing 20 frames of action per second. To make it even more complex, lets just say, that it processes data 20 times a second. (Player movement, player firing, player deaths, player *****ing, player lagging, and the other more unimportant things 20 times a second). So. 1 Tick = 1 Frame. The server tickrate is the "framerate" at which the server is running on.

Ok, now that you are confused by the tickrate term, lets see how far it is between each tick update. since it says pr second, we will use 1 second, which is 1000 milliseconds. it's Per. so we gotta divide somewhere, let's try the following. 1000ms/20 = 50ms. OK! it might seem like there is 50 milliseconds between each tick. Let's try it the other way. 50ms * 20 = 1000ms. Oh yes, we reversed the equation and got what we started with. That means. A tickrate of 20, gives 50ms between each update on server.


Netspeed

What is netspeed good for? What does it do? Is Bin Laden dead? Unfortunately, I can only answer the 2 first questions. Well, seriously, the 2 first questions is actually 1 question... Err, anyway.

The netspeed decides how much data you want to send to the server each second. A netspeed of 5000 will try to send 5000 bytes of data each second. And yes, for the smart ones out there that already guessed it, netspeed of 13690 will send 13690 bytes pr second. Also, it tells the server how much data you want to receive each second.

Some interesting aspect with the netspeed, is that it limits your framerate. Your maximum expected framerate online with netspeed 5000 is 5000/64 = 78fps. You should not get more, you will often get less. So why /64 you ask? Well, it's kinda simple. Each time your computer does an update, it sends about 64 bytes of data. So the great doods at epic thought, let's do netspeed/64 and limit framerate that way, so the client does not exceed netspeed bytes sent pr second.



Here are some pictures showing TICKRATE 20



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr3_020.jpg



TICKRATE 40



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr3_040.jpg



Now for correlation between Netspeed and Tickrate



Tickrate 30 Netspeed 500



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr30-client500.jpg



Tickrate 30 Netspeed 1000



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr30-client1000.jpg



Tickrate 30 Netspeed 5500



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr30-client5500.jpg



http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/Greek%20Fw%20190%20cropped.jpg http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/4FG2.gif

As to gunnery passes, the best was when you dived with speed, made one pass, shot an opponent down quickly, and pulled back up..... The secret was to do the job in one pass; it could be from the side or from behind and I usually tried to open fire at about 150 feet.

Major Erich Rudorffer, Luftwaffe
Seventh Leading Ace, WW-II
222 Victories (13 on One Mission)
77 On the Western Front

O Tolmon Nika

[This message was edited by Protos_335TH_GR on Sat April 10 2004 at 07:32 PM.]

Protos_335TH_GR
04-10-2004, 07:39 PM
Ok lets try this again, here is what I mean by tickrate and netspeed.


I hope by graphically illustrating my question that I will enable the reader to understand what I am asking. I am interested in creating a really KICK *** Dedicated Server for the 335th Greek Squadron and the AEP community at large. To do this I need to find ways of properly configuring the server to my hardware specs. I would like to have and plan on having a server running a 60 Tickrate with a 10,000 netspeed cap. THAT WILL BE LAN QUALITY.


Now who can tell me where tickrate is in Dedicated Server? OLEG??????!!!



Introduction

What is Tickrate?

What effect does it have in Online games

First of all. Higher tickrate does not improve ping. Very common misconception. What it ACTUALLY does, is to reduce the time between each time the server handles incoming data, and sends out new data. So let me explain it in more complex terms.

By first explaining what tickrate actually is, I hope to have made you so confused you will believe the rest of the things I write in this document.

Tickrate is actually VERY VERY COMPLEX! It is the "Frames Pr Second" the server is running at. Yes, it is so complex. A tickrate of 20 means that the server is doing 20 frames of action per second. To make it even more complex, lets just say, that it processes data 20 times a second. (Player movement, player firing, player deaths, player *****ing, player lagging, and the other more unimportant things 20 times a second). So. 1 Tick = 1 Frame. The server tickrate is the "framerate" at which the server is running on.

Ok, now that you are confused by the tickrate term, lets see how far it is between each tick update. since it says pr second, we will use 1 second, which is 1000 milliseconds. it's Per. so we gotta divide somewhere, let's try the following. 1000ms/20 = 50ms. OK! it might seem like there is 50 milliseconds between each tick. Let's try it the other way. 50ms * 20 = 1000ms. Oh yes, we reversed the equation and got what we started with. That means. A tickrate of 20, gives 50ms between each update on server.


Netspeed

What is netspeed good for? What does it do? Is Bin Laden dead? Unfortunately, I can only answer the 2 first questions. Well, seriously, the 2 first questions is actually 1 question... Err, anyway.

The netspeed decides how much data you want to send to the server each second. A netspeed of 5000 will try to send 5000 bytes of data each second. And yes, for the smart ones out there that already guessed it, netspeed of 13690 will send 13690 bytes pr second. Also, it tells the server how much data you want to receive each second.

Some interesting aspect with the netspeed, is that it limits your framerate. Your maximum expected framerate online with netspeed 5000 is 5000/64 = 78fps. You should not get more, you will often get less. So why /64 you ask? Well, it's kinda simple. Each time your computer does an update, it sends about 64 bytes of data. So the great doods at epic thought, let's do netspeed/64 and limit framerate that way, so the client does not exceed netspeed bytes sent pr second.



Here are some pictures showing TICKRATE 20



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr3_020.jpg



TICKRATE 40



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr3_040.jpg



Now for correlation between Netspeed and Tickrate



Tickrate 30 Netspeed 500



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr30-client500.jpg



Tickrate 30 Netspeed 1000



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr30-client1000.jpg



Tickrate 30 Netspeed 5500



http://www.unrealadmin.org/images/tutorials/tnse_tickrate/tr30-client5500.jpg



http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/Greek%20Fw%20190%20cropped.jpg http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/4FG2.gif

As to gunnery passes, the best was when you dived with speed, made one pass, shot an opponent down quickly, and pulled back up..... The secret was to do the job in one pass; it could be from the side or from behind and I usually tried to open fire at about 150 feet.

Major Erich Rudorffer, Luftwaffe
Seventh Leading Ace, WW-II
222 Victories (13 on One Mission)
77 On the Western Front

O Tolmon Nika

[This message was edited by Protos_335TH_GR on Sat April 10 2004 at 07:32 PM.]

hos8367
04-12-2004, 02:21 AM
I think you're thinking UT netcode is the same as netcode in every other game (i.e. IL2). Netcode varies MUCH more then you're accounting for. you can't compare a flight sim's netcode to an FPS.

Protos_335TH_GR
04-12-2004, 12:57 PM
Well thanks for the imput, care to give me some more information to support that. I am not a programming genius but it seems logical to me that 3d position and amount of bandwidth per player would be constants in any game. As an admin I am looking to optimize both of these for the smoothest possible gameplay. How is a fps so different from a sim? The shots that I posted show a target that is in midair and how tickrate and netspeed would affect your ability to hit it. I don't profess to be an expert, but this would seem to me to be something entirely relevant to flight sims. Any information or links you could provide greatly appreciated.

http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/Greek%20Fw%20190%20cropped.jpg http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/4FG2.gif

As to gunnery passes, the best was when you dived with speed, made one pass, shot an opponent down quickly, and pulled back up..... The secret was to do the job in one pass; it could be from the side or from behind and I usually tried to open fire at about 150 feet.

Major Erich Rudorffer, Luftwaffe
Seventh Leading Ace, WW-II
222 Victories (13 on One Mission)
77 On the Western Front

O Tolmon Nika

[This message was edited by Protos_335TH_GR on Mon April 12 2004 at 12:17 PM.]

Protos_335TH_GR
04-14-2004, 04:18 PM
^^^^^

http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/Greek%20Fw%20190%20cropped.jpg http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/4FG2.gif

"BUTCHER BIRD"

Major Erich Rudorffer, Luftwaffe
Seventh Leading Ace, WW-II
222 Victories (13 on One Mission)
77 On the Western Front

Protos_335TH_GR
04-16-2004, 05:00 PM
^^^^^

http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/Greek%20Fw%20190%20cropped.jpg http://members.rogers.com/335th_gr_protos/4FG2.gif

"BUTCHER BIRD"

Major Erich Rudorffer, Luftwaffe
Seventh Leading Ace, WW-II
222 Victories (13 on One Mission)
77 On the Western Front

BluesXman
04-18-2004, 05:49 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Protos_335TH_GR:
Well thanks for the imput, care to give me some more information to support that. I am not a programming genius but it seems logical to me that 3d position and amount of bandwidth per player would be constants in any game. As an admin I am looking to optimize both of these for the smoothest possible gameplay. How is a fps so different from a sim? The shots that I posted show a target that is in midair and how tickrate and netspeed would affect your ability to hit it. I don't profess to be an expert, but this would seem to me to be something entirely relevant to flight sims. Any information or links you could provide greatly appreciated.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

First off, different games do send different info and its in different formats. In fact, most game companies just roll their own protocol.

Secondly, I don't buy this 64 bytes/update number for Epic or any other game company. How much data a server sends to a client during a tick update, *has* to be based on on how much has changed for things that the client is aware
of. For example, if I'm watching sky, the server doesnt have to send me nearly as much information as if I'm watching 12 fighters duke it out, with tracers streaming and fragments of destroyed planes falling through the air.

I imagine your confusing that 64 byte number with something else. Perhaps Epic breaks an update into 64 byte packets. Anyway, at that figure, at a tickrate of 30, you only receiving 1800 byte per second. Anyone who plays shooters will tell you that you need to be able to receive a lot more than that. 20,000 bytes is generally comfortable as far as bandwidth goes for the shooters I've played.