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View Full Version : Guys, how is it on the Android mobile gaming front?



xitooner
10-20-2014, 08:54 PM
From one set of gamers (IOS) to another set....are things really this bad overall in Android-land, or in respect to Frontier? I know this article is from AppleInsider, which is going to be biased as heck, but I tend to read most gaming articles regardless of mobile affiliation, and I really dont find many that are overwhelmingly positive on Android mobile gaming....

http://appleinsider.com/articles/14/10/01/apples-a8-iphone-6-extend-ios-gaming-lead-over-androids-google-play
(just asking)

mutetus
10-20-2014, 09:52 PM
Well, if someone wants to pay double the price of a two year old high-end Android device for the barely noticeable extra oomph and the street cred then go for it. Just wait for the Nexus 6.

FrozenWaterfall
10-22-2014, 12:37 PM
In terms of developers choosing platforms - iOS users spend much more frivolously in all areas of potential spending on their phones. iOS users spend more on apps by far, so it's definitely more the market of choice. It seems that more games are aimed towards those phones as there is more money to be made, rather than actual capabilities of the phones. If your only desire is gaming, then by all means spend a lot more on an iOS phone and the subsequent apps. But if you care about value, then buy an XBox One/PS4, or an Android phone. Hell, for the price of an iOS phone you can afford both a console and an equivalent Android phone and get the best of both worlds.

tl;dr - iOS users spend a lot more so developers focus more on this OS.



In respect of the "article" - Wow, those figures and charts are awful. Literally impossible to see what they actually did, and what criteria were used. All of this is basically useless and has no value at all. Quite a common technique used in order to manipulate information that tells you nothing, or actually shows the opposite of what you claim.

I'd be interested to see some actual information on this. You know, something that's coherent, readable, and not focused entirely on the areas where Apple can claim superiority.

xitooner
10-22-2014, 05:47 PM
In terms of developers choosing platforms - iOS users spend much more frivolously in all areas of potential spending on their phones. iOS users spend more on apps by far, so it's definitely more the market of choice. It seems that more games are aimed towards those phones as there is more money to be made, rather than actual capabilities of the phones. If your only desire is gaming, then by all means spend a lot more on an iOS phone and the subsequent apps.

The developers follow the money, no doubt about it. I have to admit its a nice fringe benefit to be on a system that often seems to get earlier focus (ex Frontier) :) I get my companies Samsung Galaxy one week out of every 2 months, so I get to experience/play both sides at least a little. . .but "visiting" is not the same as living there, which is why I made the OP.



But if you care about value, then buy an XBox One/PS4, or an Android phone. Hell, for the price of an iOS phone you can afford both a console and an equivalent Android phone and get the best of both worlds.

"Value" is a tenuous term, since it depends on what is it you value; its not always purely money. Right now, I still have not had a serious reason to jump from my 360 precisely because XBOne/PS4 HASNT shown me more value (Trials was released on all 3, for instance). Features/games I dont use/play isnt value. Although its clear that by sheer weight of new releases that day is almost here.... one day something will arrive that makes it worth the jump. :)



I'd be interested to see some actual information on this. You know, something that's coherent, readable, and not focused entirely on the areas where Apple can claim superiority.

I think we all would; sadly gaming articles arent known for their journalistic accuracy. :) I've read Android-biased articles as well.....which is why I just read them all when I get a chance and form my own opinions.

FrozenWaterfall
10-23-2014, 12:07 AM
The developers follow the money, no doubt about it. I have to admit its a nice fringe benefit to be on a system that often seems to get earlier focus (ex Frontier) :) I get my companies Samsung Galaxy one week out of every 2 months, so I get to experience/play both sides at least a little. . .but "visiting" is not the same as living there, which is why I made the OP.
I still play PS3 when I want to game. I had a PS4 but sold it as it wasn't worth the price. I only game on my phone when I'm between classes at uni, so I don't know much about what's to offer. But I do know where the money is, and that's definitely iOS.



"Value" is a tenuous term, since it depends on what is it you value; its not always purely money. Right now, I still have not had a serious reason to jump from my 360 precisely because XBOne/PS4 HASNT shown me more value (Trials was released on all 3, for instance). Features/games I dont use/play isnt value. Although its clear that by sheer weight of new releases that day is almost here.... one day something will arrive that makes it worth the jump. :)
Yeah, if it's gaming you want, then consoles are better value for what you get. In the same respect, you can buy a PS3/XBox360 instead of a phone for gaming. So yeah, you don't even need a current gen console if you're happy with what you have, but then you certainly don't need a phone just for gaming as there's little to gain there. Android phones are generally accepted as being better value for money than iOS counterparts, and there are practically no honest reviews that say Apple is worth the cost based on what you get.



I think we all would; sadly gaming articles arent known for their journalistic accuracy. :) I've read Android-biased articles as well.....which is why I just read them all when I get a chance and form my own opinions.
Exactly. Everyone has a motive. Makes it hard to get an honest answer unless you ask a lot of people/read a lot of reviews.

stewedyeti
10-28-2014, 07:48 AM
I don't have much experience in terms of game development (a little too much math for me to really enjoy), but the big differences -- aside from the amount of money users are willing to spend -- are in the consistency between devices and how deep relevant APIs can easily communicate to the hardware on a lower-level. Google is slowly tackling this issue, but the vast array of hardware differences from one device to the next is quite an obstacle when it comes to fully utilizing its capabilities and that means the resources a dev has to use will be inherently limited by those differences. Android is also held back (at least in my opinion) by its utilization of Java as the basis for most of its user-facing frameworks/APIs. Even though Android doesn't use the standard Java runtime, it still encounters many of the same problems that have plagued Java since the beginning and it's not a programming language commonly considered suitable for game development as it has very poor support for targeting low-level hardware facilities. Again, Google is definitely working on solving these problems and the eventual ("official") switch from the Dalvik runtime to ART will help tackle performance issues dramatically.

iOS, on the other hand, has an advantage as it will only ever run on very specific hardware that Apple designs itself. Low-level functions are much easier to target since the underlying APIs and frameworks for iOS are developed by Apple for that explicit purpose and can be tied to only hardware Apple creates. Like it mentions in that article, Apple has recently included a new API in iOS 8 that exists entirely to improve the performance of graphical operations in games. All of this combined with a development community that is largely perfectionist makes iOS a very nice platform to develop for, both in apps and games.

Honestly, though, I think the biggest issue is the amount of terrible crap on the Play Store. It's over-saturated with poor quality apps and as a result many gems stay buried underneath an avalanche of mediocrity because there isn't any sort of obstacle from them being in the Play Store other than a one-time fee of something like $25 bucks where as the iOS App Store requires a developer account from Apple that costs $99 a year.