PDA

View Full Version : My quick discussion with a real 109G-14/AS pilot.



Hunde_3.JG51
06-06-2004, 07:59 PM
Just got back from the Mid-Atlantic WWII Expo in Reading Pennsylvania and I'm exhausted. Too many cool things to even try to cover.

I had the pleasure of speaking to Gottfried Paul Johannes Dulias of 3./JG53. I am too tired to write everything about him but you can find some info about him here:

http://www.luftwaffereenactors.org/Dulias.htm

I asked him a few quick questions as there were alot of people waiting to speak to him (later I would hear him speak in a more public setting).

First I asked him if his plane (109G-14A/S) had the 151/20 or Mk.108 cannon. He went on to tell me about his training aircraft, the Me-108. I didn't want to be rude so I let him finish, then clarified my question. I should have known he would refer to it as the 3cm cannon. He said the 30mm (in my words) was very effective. He said in his second aerial victory that he snuck up on a Spitfire and with a single round ripped the back half of the plane off and the rest of it tumbled over itself in a forward motion. He said that the breach of the cannon was just in front and under him and that when he fired it that it jolted him and the aircraft violently. Still, he believed the cannon was very effective and not just as a bomber interceptor weapon. I heard him make a second comment to someone about the 7.62mm machine guns, stating that they were not very effective at all. This was not the case with the 13mm mg's. If I understood him correctly he made a comment about the 20mm MG-FF cannons not being very effective either (He said the barrels in front of him were from "under-wing" cannons, but I recognized them as MG-FF barrels and he pointed to the 109E, but I may be wrong).

Second, I asked him about control forces in high speed dives. He stated that the controls stiffed up greatly at high speed as in any plane but the plane had a tendency to pull itself out of a dive. He made an interesting comment about using an airbrake to help in recovery and, seeing the look on my face, clarified. What he was referring to was the full opening of the radiator, he said this helped recovery in high speed dives and helped slow the time to excessive speeds. He said he could dive the 109 very sharply and never had any fear of it breaking up. He said that they used to escape from Mustangs by diving 90 degrees straight down and pulling out at very high speeds. He said the P-51 would break apart and lose it's wings and could not follow.

Third, I asked him about MW-50 boost and how long could it be used without overheating. He said the boost was not to be used for longer than one minute, but it provided quite a boost.

I asked him if he ever flew the FW-190, he said that he had not but another member of his squad did. He said that he thought the only advantage it had was the wide landing gear. I did not want to argue with him http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif but he admitted that his mate was a long-time 109 flyer, and that their objective was to engage fighter escorts and not the bombers.

I asked if he had ever flown the 109K-4 and he said that he had not, and that there were not many of them around.

I asked if he felt the 109's powerplant had over-powered the airframe through development? He said that he did not believe so, but the most noticeable difference in later models was the torque, and on takeoff it had to be fought constantly.

At this point I simply could not ask anymore questions without being rude to others so I thanked him for his time and moved on.

It was obvious to me that this man loved the 109G, in his speech he referred to it as his "sweetheart", and his "trusty Gustav." Whether or not his statements were 100% accurate or unbiased, I really don't care. The thrill for me was untarnished and was the opportunity of a life-time. In the end he revealed himself to be a gentlemen and a humanitarian who IMO deserves respect, and I was honored to spend a few moments with him. I hope to be in contact with him by e-mail when I can put together a well thought out message, and hopefully have the chance to hear more from this living piece of history.

http://www.militaryartshop.com/prints/bailey/warwolf.jpg

Formerly Kyrule2
http://www.jg51.com/

[This message was edited by Hunde_3.JG51 on Sun June 06 2004 at 07:08 PM.]

Hunde_3.JG51
06-06-2004, 07:59 PM
Just got back from the Mid-Atlantic WWII Expo in Reading Pennsylvania and I'm exhausted. Too many cool things to even try to cover.

I had the pleasure of speaking to Gottfried Paul Johannes Dulias of 3./JG53. I am too tired to write everything about him but you can find some info about him here:

http://www.luftwaffereenactors.org/Dulias.htm

I asked him a few quick questions as there were alot of people waiting to speak to him (later I would hear him speak in a more public setting).

First I asked him if his plane (109G-14A/S) had the 151/20 or Mk.108 cannon. He went on to tell me about his training aircraft, the Me-108. I didn't want to be rude so I let him finish, then clarified my question. I should have known he would refer to it as the 3cm cannon. He said the 30mm (in my words) was very effective. He said in his second aerial victory that he snuck up on a Spitfire and with a single round ripped the back half of the plane off and the rest of it tumbled over itself in a forward motion. He said that the breach of the cannon was just in front and under him and that when he fired it that it jolted him and the aircraft violently. Still, he believed the cannon was very effective and not just as a bomber interceptor weapon. I heard him make a second comment to someone about the 7.62mm machine guns, stating that they were not very effective at all. This was not the case with the 13mm mg's. If I understood him correctly he made a comment about the 20mm MG-FF cannons not being very effective either (He said the barrels in front of him were from "under-wing" cannons, but I recognized them as MG-FF barrels and he pointed to the 109E, but I may be wrong).

Second, I asked him about control forces in high speed dives. He stated that the controls stiffed up greatly at high speed as in any plane but the plane had a tendency to pull itself out of a dive. He made an interesting comment about using an airbrake to help in recovery and, seeing the look on my face, clarified. What he was referring to was the full opening of the radiator, he said this helped recovery in high speed dives and helped slow the time to excessive speeds. He said he could dive the 109 very sharply and never had any fear of it breaking up. He said that they used to escape from Mustangs by diving 90 degrees straight down and pulling out at very high speeds. He said the P-51 would break apart and lose it's wings and could not follow.

Third, I asked him about MW-50 boost and how long could it be used without overheating. He said the boost was not to be used for longer than one minute, but it provided quite a boost.

I asked him if he ever flew the FW-190, he said that he had not but another member of his squad did. He said that he thought the only advantage it had was the wide landing gear. I did not want to argue with him http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif but he admitted that his mate was a long-time 109 flyer, and that their objective was to engage fighter escorts and not the bombers.

I asked if he had ever flown the 109K-4 and he said that he had not, and that there were not many of them around.

I asked if he felt the 109's powerplant had over-powered the airframe through development? He said that he did not believe so, but the most noticeable difference in later models was the torque, and on takeoff it had to be fought constantly.

At this point I simply could not ask anymore questions without being rude to others so I thanked him for his time and moved on.

It was obvious to me that this man loved the 109G, in his speech he referred to it as his "sweetheart", and his "trusty Gustav." Whether or not his statements were 100% accurate or unbiased, I really don't care. The thrill for me was untarnished and was the opportunity of a life-time. In the end he revealed himself to be a gentlemen and a humanitarian who IMO deserves respect, and I was honored to spend a few moments with him. I hope to be in contact with him by e-mail when I can put together a well thought out message, and hopefully have the chance to hear more from this living piece of history.

http://www.militaryartshop.com/prints/bailey/warwolf.jpg

Formerly Kyrule2
http://www.jg51.com/

[This message was edited by Hunde_3.JG51 on Sun June 06 2004 at 07:08 PM.]

jensenpark
06-06-2004, 08:10 PM
thanks for sharing!!!!

http://www.corsair-web.com/thistler/rtfoxint.jpg
Buzz Beurling flying his last sortie over Malta, Oct.24, 1942

BaldieJr
06-06-2004, 08:11 PM
Ask these guys what their favorite foods are, or thier favorite memory of all-time.

I'd be so damned sick of WWII questions, after 60+ years, that I'd probably cary a brick with me everywhere I went... I'd call it my "curiousity killer", and show it to everyone.

<pre class="ip-ubbcode-code-pre">
My Specs (read 'em and weep):
* Automatically grinds whole beans before brewing
* Fully programmable 24 hours in advance
* Brew Pause feature lets you enjoy a cup before brewing has finished
* Automatically shuts off when brewing is complete
* Grind-off feature for brewing ground coffee
* 1-4 cup feature to accommodate coffee for one
* 10-cup double-wall insulated thermal carafe to keep your coffee hot long after brewing
* Gold tone commercial-style permanent filter eliminates the need to buy coffee filters
* Charcoal water filter removes impurities from the water
* Separate grinder chamber and filter area allow for easy cleanup
* Limited 3-year warranty
</pre>

Hunde_3.JG51
06-06-2004, 08:16 PM
Baldie, you couldn't be more wrong. He was very enthusiastic when speaking, and written in the program he clearly states that he could not speak about the war for a long time (over 40+ years) because he could not face it. This caused him much stress and was a problem for him in adjusting to normal life. He finally attended an air-show in NY one year and saw an Me-109 there. He got involved with the people there and he found that he could finally talk about his experiences. Now he finds it very therapeutic to speak about his time during the war as it helps him accept the past. He is currently ivolved in the 109G-6 restoration project and is writing a book as well.

So in short, you're wrong http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

http://www.militaryartshop.com/prints/bailey/warwolf.jpg

Formerly Kyrule2
http://www.jg51.com/

meh_cd
06-06-2004, 08:28 PM
Ah, sounds like a really cool guy! I read the article you had the link to, really neat.

So, the only plane he flew in combat was the G-14/AS, right? Wish we had one, I want a G-14 with a Galland-hood.

Hunde_3.JG51
06-06-2004, 08:37 PM
Correct, only the 109G-14A/S in combat, but he flew the Me-108 and Me-109E in training. I say "Me-109" (not Bf-109) because that it how he referred to it.

And he is a very interesting man, his stories of being in a work/prison camp long after the war are fascinating, and disgusting at the same time. He spoke of how the Russian winter was too cold so they would not bury the bodies of the dead, instead they would place them on an ever-growing pile that would be feasted on by dogs. He became very emotional at this time. As the article says of the almost 5,000 POW's taken, less than 400 survived years later. They thought they were going home after the war ended, and years later he did but only after he was deemed useless as a forced laborer and after his weight dropped to 67 pounds.

http://www.militaryartshop.com/prints/bailey/warwolf.jpg

Formerly Kyrule2
http://www.jg51.com/

Cragger
06-06-2004, 08:49 PM
Further proof that history is written by the victor. The 'attrocities' the Red Army commited both during and after the war is comparable if not equal than those committed by the Third Reich. Even more expunged from the records is those by US and British.

"It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it." -- General Robert E. Lee.

http://redspar.com/redrogue/cragger_sig.jpg

LEXX_Luthor
06-06-2004, 09:19 PM
Thanks for sharing Hunde. Many VVS pilots also prefered the big 37mm on http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif the Yak~9T for air combat even though it is generally claimed to be for ground attack. I believe at least half the Yak~9Ts were used in the pure fighter role.


Cragger, not exactly true, but the major difference is that had Germany won the war, the prisoners from the East would have never been sent home as the conquered space was meant for "Aryan" Germans, although at the same time even the Purist of Pure "Aryan" Germans were being methodically Exterminated by the psychiatrists working for the Nazis--these were NOT political Nazis, a bizzare and significant point, and they came to Germany from all the western democracies to practice Mental Hygiene on the both German people and the people the Germans conquered (basically, an early experimental version of a UN style "New World Order" as it is now called by Bush Senior).


__________________
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/10.gif Flyable Swedish "Gladiator" listed as J8A ...in Aces Expansion Pack

"You will still have FB , you will lose nothing" ~WUAF_Badsight
"I had actually pre ordered CFS3 and I couldnt wait..." ~Bearcat99
"Gladiator and Falco, elegant weapons of a more civilized age" ~ElAurens
:
"Damn.....Where you did read about Spitfire made from a wood?
Close this book forever and don't open anymore!" ~Oleg_Maddox http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

[This message was edited by LEXX_Luthor on Sun June 06 2004 at 08:30 PM.]

Cyrano
06-06-2004, 09:22 PM
Hunde,

Thanks for recounting your questions to Mr. Dulias. I only wish we had many more on this forum.

BuzzU
06-06-2004, 09:22 PM
The 13mm was more effective than the 20mm? How is this explained?

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Buzz
http://www.elknet.pl/acestory/foto/anderson9.jpg

Franzen
06-06-2004, 09:44 PM
Lexx_Luther, I must say I always enjoy reading you posts. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif
Thx for posting Hunde. I hope that someday I'll have this sort of opportunity you've had. Quick question, did your goosebumbs show? http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz Franzen

PBNA-Boosher
06-06-2004, 09:58 PM
I talked with him for awhile as well today. He's a really cool guy. I got his photo, a small placard, and his signature. I also wanted to talk to the Tuskeegee Airmen, but they were busy little drones, signing away autographs like crazy.

He's an honorable man. Even though I'm Jewish, and even though he fought for Nazi Germany, I know a good man when I see one. This was a good man. He did what any other man would have done for his country. He fought.

He shot down 2 british spitfires and 3 Russian planes, including a Rata.

Hunde_3.JG51
06-06-2004, 10:58 PM
Buzz, like I said I could be wrong, maybe it is because of the low muzzle velocity of the MG-FF and the lower trajectory. I could have been mistaken in his comment though. Like I said he said the under-wing cannons but they clearly looked like MG-FF barrels to me, and he gestured at the Emil. Many felt the 151/20 was a very big improvement over the MG-FF so maybe he was speaking relatively. The 131's were effective for heavy machine guns, with the MG-FF not being as effective as one would expect from 20mm cannon.

Nice Boosher, I got an autographed picture/placard as well. Quite a show eh? The Museum part was excellent, I got to talk to the Tuskegee Airmen as well and they were very personable and friendly, one of them even started talking to me out of nowhere. I went on to ask him a series of questions, and he told me how the famous red-tails were actually the result of them painting over old, beat up planes that they recieved and it just sort of stuck from there. I thanked him for the talk, and thanked him and his group for all that they had done. I wish I had more time to grill them but again the lines were long and I felt rude taking up as much time as I did.

Franzen, the goosebumps didn't show. To be honest I wanted to ask so many questions and I had so little time that I just started asking and concentrated on his answers. When I listened to his stories when he spoke publicy, I think everyone had goosebumps.

http://www.militaryartshop.com/prints/bailey/warwolf.jpg

Formerly Kyrule2
http://www.jg51.com/

koivis
06-07-2004, 12:49 AM
BuzzU posted: The 13mm was more effective than the 20mm? How is this explained?

That's simple, the MG 131 was far more easier to aim, it had a lot more ammunition (300 vs 60). With the cannon, you could only shoot couple of planes down, and you'd have only 7,92 mm guns left, which were nearly useless.

Wallstein
06-07-2004, 03:45 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Hunde_3.JG51:
Just got back from the Mid-Atlantic WWII Expo...

THANK YOU VERY MUCH. This is exciting and enlightning. We will not get this kind of living history for very long anymore. Please, save all your notes for the years to come.

Thanks!

F19_Ob
06-07-2004, 04:02 AM
Thnx for your effort Hunde.

...Yes it seems that many veterans are happy that so many wants to hear their story and generally about the time they lived in.

thnx again

Matz0r
06-07-2004, 04:54 AM
Thanks Hunde http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Having watched some of the D-Day ceremonies over in Normandy and hearing about protests against Reichskansler Gerhard Schr√¬∂der attending, made me wonder if German vets ever will be able to participate in similar peace celibrations.

http://www.pfy.nu/tmp/fw3.jpg

[This message was edited by Matz0r on Mon June 07 2004 at 04:14 AM.]

Udidtoo
06-07-2004, 05:38 AM
Hunde, you and Boosher make me jealous. I treasure every opportunity I have had to talk to and learn something from the walking breathing men who were a part of our history.

Politics shmolitics, had I been born in that time. Like the majority of men I'm certain I would have fought for nation and home.

I'm glad he is able to live at peace with himself in his golden years. My last surving uncle on dads side was the same way. He kept all his pacific memories bottled up inside until they wore a hole thru his soul. Only after finally talking to others about what he saw and what he did was he able to come to grips with it.

As for the German being protested at the D-day ceramonies. Why does this surprise you. Take a look at the size of this forum and what happens when a former leader dies. Some salute, most who disagree do so silently and with respect but there is always that element who have to take a pi$$ on anything they personally disagree with.

Matzor, all I can offer is a weak don't put to much into it. As with here the rational majority don't make nearly the noise as the rabid few who do all thy can to make sure that tranquility is rarely attained.

..............................
I always have just enough fuel to arrive at the scene of my crash.

wayno7777
06-07-2004, 08:57 AM
Thanks very much, Hunde. I was there Saturday and didn't get to talk to anyone cause we were all packed in the hanger. I did get a pic of the Tuskegee gentlemen.
http://img74.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/Tuskegee_Airmen6-5-04.jpg
And thanks for the link. I used it to go to the LARA site. It is a very interesting site!

World War Two Weekend June 6, 2004 Reading, PA
Over 70 planes including a P-38 (hopin' for GG)FIFI is there.
http://img74.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/FB%20shots/Aircraft/heinkel_219.jpg
Any landing you can walk away from is a good one!

Blutarski2004
06-07-2004, 09:29 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Udidtoo:
My last surving uncle on dads side was the same way. He kept all his pacific memories bottled up inside until they wore a hole thru his soul. Only after finally talking to others about what he saw and what he did was he able to come to grips with it.

..... similar deal with my father (now 83 feisty years of age). It has only been within the past ten years or so that he has permitted himself to re-visit his time in the Pacific. The catalyst was when an old friend and shipmate, whom he had not heard from in about 50 years, tracked him down and renewed acquaintances. They are now once again fast friends.


As for the German being protested at the D-day ceremonies.

..... I recall the occasion of Reagan's wreath-laying at the German military cemetery during his presidency. It was on his part a brave political act, which occasioned a firestorm of criticism from his political opponents.



Take a look at the size of this forum and what happens when a former leader dies. Some salute, most who disagree do so silently and with respect but there is always that element who have to take a pi$$ on anything they personally disagree with.

..... How true.

BLUTARSKI

Blutarski2004
06-07-2004, 09:46 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Cragger:
Further proof that history is written by the victor. The 'attrocities' the Red Army commited both during and after the war is comparable if not equal than those committed by the Third Reich. Even more expunged from the records is those by US and British.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


..... History is written by the party in control of the printing presses. Typically, this is the original victor, but such things can easily change with the passage of time.

BTW, do you mean to imply that the postwar behavior of the western allies toward defeated Germany was worse/harsher than that of the Soviet Union?

BLUTARSKI

Capt._Tenneal
06-07-2004, 09:51 AM
You are indeed fortunate, Hunde (and others) who have had the honor of meeting and speaking to these men. Those WW II vets who want to keep memories to themselves or who are "tired of all these WW II" questions would not attend these shows anyway. Those who do don't mind talking about their experiences, so who are we to presume that they are tired of the questions ?

As their generation slowly passes away, one should treasure any time we get to hear first-hand from ANY one who served from ANY country, Axis or Ally.

Hunde_3.JG51
06-07-2004, 02:10 PM
You're welcome guys, hope to have more in the future.

Sweet wayno, nice pic. The guy in the middle was the one who just started talking to me out of nowhere. He was cool as hell, I could have talked with him for hours. If only I/he had more time...

http://www.militaryartshop.com/prints/bailey/warwolf.jpg

Formerly Kyrule2
http://www.jg51.com/

Sturmtrooper
06-07-2004, 02:18 PM
Thanks for sharing , Hunde . There aren't too many of these old birds left !

http://home.bellsouth.net/coDataImages/p/Groups/183/183586/pages/456377/untitled1.gif

F16_txmx
06-07-2004, 02:34 PM
Most intresting read, tnx for sharing it with us Hunde! Really hope that you are able to establish e-mail conversation with him.

"Pay to kill, die to lose..."
http://www.flygflottilj16.se/images/sigs_avatars/txmx_sig.jpg (http://www.flygflottilj16.se)
P4 3GHz | ABIT IC7-G | 1GB DDR PC2700 | Radeon 9800 Pro 128MB | Philips 170S4 TFT
Windows XP Professional | DirectX 9.0b | Saitek X45 Hotas | CH Pedals | TrackIR

p1ngu666
06-07-2004, 04:15 PM
cool http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

http://www.pingu666.modded.me.uk/mysig3.jpg
&lt;123_GWood_JG123&gt; NO SPAM!

Red_Russian13
06-07-2004, 04:16 PM
Great post (and all the follow-ups), enjoyed reading.

I'll be speaking with some guys from the famed "Easy" Company (Band of Brothers fame). Turns out, two of them live in my town! I'll post something about it as the time draws closer. I want to get some of your questions to ask them for you guys.

Red Russian

GT182
06-07-2004, 04:44 PM
Hunde_3.JG51, if I'm not mistake Gottfried Paul Johannes Dulias was there in uniform too. I got to meet him at the Exit gate while I was working. And a very nice gentleman at that. I"d asked if his uniform was Luftwaffa and he said yes that it was his and he was a real Me- 109 pilot. I almost messed my pants from that and didn't know what to say except that it was an honor and a pleasure to meet him. If only I'd have thought to have my WWII Weekend shirt autographed by him but as it was so wet Saturday and I was chilled to the bone, I completely forgot.

But.... I did get autographs of as many pilots as I could.

I hope many of you that attended got autographs. I was lucky to get the Tuskegee Airman and other pilots too. It actually brought tears to my eyes to see these fine gentleman and pay my respects. I was told that they have lost 18 members of their group in the last year and a half.

I even got to meet and shake hands with General Tibbets on Thursday after we setup the gates. For a man who is over 80, he sure can talk.

On Friday there was a walk-in P38 Recon pilot. I got to listen to him talk about Gen. Douglas McArthur for a bit but couldn't get a chance to ask questions. He told some very interesting things about the 38 and McArthur. I can only remember them referring to him as Mac. If anyone knows his full name could you please let me know.

I do have Andrew "Andy" Michalak's signature. He was the Spitfire pilot. Also Dan Dameo's who flew the F4U Corsair. This was one that never saw action as it didn't have armoured glass.


"GT182" / "Stab/JG51_vonSpinmeister"
www.bombs-away.net (http://www.bombs-away.net)
"Fly to Survive, Survive to Fly"

[This message was edited by GT182 on Mon June 07 2004 at 03:53 PM.]

[This message was edited by GT182 on Mon June 07 2004 at 03:57 PM.]

SUPERAEREO
06-07-2004, 05:19 PM
A big thank you for sharing Hunde: not enough attention is being paid to these old folks who were tere at the time and losing their memories is a crime indeed.

S!



"The first time I ever saw a jet, I shot it down." - Chuck Yaeger

"Ja, Hunde, wollt ihr denn ewig leben?" - Friedrich der Große

"Timeo Danaos, et dona ferentes" - ”*neid

Jumoschwanz
06-07-2004, 10:44 PM
Interesting about the torque on take off. I think this is undermodeled in the current patch. My old friend Pete, in his mid-eighties now, flew the spit, P51, P47, b-24 and B-17 in WWII.

He has told me many times that simply rolling on the throttle too fast on takeoff would roll the plane right upside down. He said they lost a lot of planes and pilots from engine torque related accidents. He said he had to use full rudder and other heavy control inputs taking off in the single engine fighters to keep them straight.

I can whack on full throttle pretty easily in FB during take-off.

I am sure the war was different for everyone in it. But you don't have to ask Pete to start talking about flying in WWII. He rambles on about it everytime I see him. In fact he has a exhaust manifold temperature gauge off a WWII plane on his truck he drives, so he can tell you how his air fuel mixture is while he drives around. He is one in a million.

Jumoschwanz

JG5_UnKle
06-08-2004, 03:14 AM
S! Hunde

thnx

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/victoria.stevens/jg5_logo.jpg
JG5 Main Site (http://www.alucinor.com/eismeer)
Public Forum (http://www.alucinor.com/eismeer/forum)

bazzaah2
06-08-2004, 08:00 AM
S! Hunde; thanks for that.

http://www.endlager.net/fis/pix/banners/fis_banner_05.gif

Crashing online as :FI:SpinyNorman

F19_Ob
06-08-2004, 08:50 AM
I dont mean to hijack this thread...but I thought it would be nice with a few other personal question interviews.

I hope most of U visits virtual pilots site occasionally, since they collect and make interviews with veterans.

latest was G√ľnther Rall on visit in Finland:
http://www.virtualpilots.fi/en/hist/WW2History-GuntherRallEnglish.html

but there are other similar ones:
http://www.virtualpilots.fi/en/hist/

Lots of info in these

keep up the good work http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

tsisqua
06-08-2004, 09:22 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by PBNA-Boosher:
I talked with him for awhile as well today. He's a really cool guy. I got his photo, a small placard, and his signature. I also wanted to talk to the Tuskeegee Airmen, but they were busy little drones, signing away autographs like crazy.

He's an honorable man. Even though I'm Jewish, and even though he fought for Nazi Germany, I know a good man when I see one. This was a good man. He did what any other man would have done for his country. He fought.

He shot down 2 british spitfires and 3 Russian planes, including a Rata.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hunde,
Thanks so much! I love to hear recounts that are first hand.

Boosher, if only others had your attitude. The Yank vets that I know still harbour animosities. Very sad after all these years. Those pilots were brave, and usually honorable men. How many stories have I heard about two pilots from opposing sides engaging each other, but not being able to continue the fight for whatever reason, then saluting each other before RTB'ing?

The fact that you are Jewish, and still have this wonderful attitude tells me that you are an honorable person as well.

Salute!
Tsisqua

Capt._Tenneal
06-08-2004, 09:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by tsisqua:

...The Yank vets that I know still harbour animosities. Very sad after all these years.

Salute!
Tsisqua<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I wonder why ? As they, supposedly, were on the winning side.

tsisqua
06-08-2004, 09:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>I wonder why ? As they, supposedly, were on the winning side.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Most of the vets that I know were ground troops, or para. Also, I live in rural Appalachia, where higher education is a rare thing . . . these are good people, they just can't seem to forget the horror and feel a need to blame. Just psychological victims of a very horrific ground war. To them, all they saw was an enemy that they were taught to hate by the wars propaganda machine. I think that the propaganda worked so well that it is still working on them, all these years later. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

Tsisqua

Venom079
06-08-2004, 11:55 AM
Very cool read indeed!
Thnx Hundehttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

biggs222
06-08-2004, 12:14 PM
hey hunde ask him if he ever outturned a spitmkIX

horseback
06-08-2004, 12:37 PM
Some pilots may have some animosity for their former enemies for good reason. Allied aircrew shot down over late war Germany and especially Japan were often torn apart or murdered by the locals, and in some cases, the military or government authorities actually participated.

Axis personnel were usually treated much better when they fell into Allied hands, and they knew they would be...

cheers

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944

Istreliteli
06-08-2004, 12:38 PM
True...believe it or not the butcher in my neighborhood was an SS guard at Birkinau...he told my mother because shes his doctor...hes such a cheery man though, never talks about the war...i think id like to keep it that way...lest...yeah

Ya sizhu i smotru chuzhoya neba iz chuzhoya okna, i ne vidyem ne odnoi znakom iz zvezdiy,ya hodil po vsyem dorogo iz tuda i suda, a vernusya i ne smog, razgredyet sledi, no isli yest karmane pachka sigaret nachat vsye ne tak uzh plocha na syevodnachniy dyen-Victor Tsoi, Kino (Gruppa Krovi)

Hunde_3.JG51
06-08-2004, 06:44 PM
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif biggs222

Maybe I will ask him about out-turning the Spitfire if he allows me to put together a Q & A session.

He did say that after his 15 minute dogfight with a Spitifre pilot that he was absolutely sure that he won the fight because he had the superior aircraft. He met the man from London who he had shot down later on at his home base, and after a friendly greeting and discussion of the engagement the RAF pilot agreed that he had lost due to the superiority of the 109G-14A/S. He said he was not sure of the Spitfire Mk. but we agreed that it was likely a Spitfire IX, he was sure it was not a Mk.XIV.

One other thing I wanted to share was that when Mr. Dulias was signing autographs somebody walked up with a Sgt. Shultz button on from Hogan's Heroes. He pointed to the pin and said laughing "Shultz!...I KNOW NOTHING!" That was funny as hell.

http://www.militaryartshop.com/prints/bailey/warwolf.jpg

Formerly Kyrule2
http://www.jg51.com/

biggs222
06-08-2004, 06:49 PM
its funny ud be surprised at how many times the germans thought the mkIXs were mkVs and vice versa..but the G14 seems a little late to be engaging the older mkV....did he mention anythign about turning with the spit?

Edit oops u havent talked to him yet aobout that..well id really liek to hear it http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif