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03-12-2004, 03:29 PM
Hi all.

I am new to the IL-FB, and new to the flight sims in general. I've been training for a couple of days with dumbed-down settings to get a feel for the joystick etc., and now I want to up the realism for practice before I go into the campaign on full-real. But, there are a few things that I don't understand, and the manual is not really helpful in those aspects. So, I was wondering whether someone would be so kind to clarify a few things for me, as it's hard for me to judge most of them due to my inexperience.

1. Engines: I assume that open radiator flaps increase drag and slow the plane down, but why are there several settings for them? Is there a point in using those intermediate settings, or does it makes sense to just use full open and full closed settings? Are the intermediate levels modeled correctly in terms of cooling and drag?

2. Cowl flaps and armor flaps: What do these do, and how do I know which planes have them? When to use them?

3. I still don't see a point in using combat flaps over raised flaps, as it seems that I only lose speed and gain nothing. But I guess there must be a point to them, so could someone please explain what it is?

4. What do the trimming settings for rudder etc. do? Can I do the trimming on all planes to get their ascribed benefits?

5. Why would I want to have certain percentages of mixtures? What's the benefit/cost for having 10% mixture vs. 60% mixture? Also, what's the difference between mixture, supercharger, and WEP?

6. I assume propeller pitch has to be turned down with a decrease in power so the engine doesn't overheat. Are there any other uses for it, such as increasing performance with some special settings?

7. What are the uses for the two magneto settings, feather propeller, and locking tail wheel? Which planes use those? Also, it says in the control list that I can adjust gunsight along with the bombsight, but I've never been able to do that?

8. Why are there keys to toggle up to 8 engines and 10 crewmembers, while the most I've been able to see were 4 engines and 6 crew? Am I missing something, and I can actually fly some other bombers than those in the training missions (which is something I'd like very much)?

Quite a few questions - hopefully somebody will be kind enough to answer.

Cheers,

03-12-2004, 03:29 PM
Hi all.

I am new to the IL-FB, and new to the flight sims in general. I've been training for a couple of days with dumbed-down settings to get a feel for the joystick etc., and now I want to up the realism for practice before I go into the campaign on full-real. But, there are a few things that I don't understand, and the manual is not really helpful in those aspects. So, I was wondering whether someone would be so kind to clarify a few things for me, as it's hard for me to judge most of them due to my inexperience.

1. Engines: I assume that open radiator flaps increase drag and slow the plane down, but why are there several settings for them? Is there a point in using those intermediate settings, or does it makes sense to just use full open and full closed settings? Are the intermediate levels modeled correctly in terms of cooling and drag?

2. Cowl flaps and armor flaps: What do these do, and how do I know which planes have them? When to use them?

3. I still don't see a point in using combat flaps over raised flaps, as it seems that I only lose speed and gain nothing. But I guess there must be a point to them, so could someone please explain what it is?

4. What do the trimming settings for rudder etc. do? Can I do the trimming on all planes to get their ascribed benefits?

5. Why would I want to have certain percentages of mixtures? What's the benefit/cost for having 10% mixture vs. 60% mixture? Also, what's the difference between mixture, supercharger, and WEP?

6. I assume propeller pitch has to be turned down with a decrease in power so the engine doesn't overheat. Are there any other uses for it, such as increasing performance with some special settings?

7. What are the uses for the two magneto settings, feather propeller, and locking tail wheel? Which planes use those? Also, it says in the control list that I can adjust gunsight along with the bombsight, but I've never been able to do that?

8. Why are there keys to toggle up to 8 engines and 10 crewmembers, while the most I've been able to see were 4 engines and 6 crew? Am I missing something, and I can actually fly some other bombers than those in the training missions (which is something I'd like very much)?

Quite a few questions - hopefully somebody will be kind enough to answer.

Cheers,

Chuck_Older
03-12-2004, 04:12 PM
1. I have no idea if these flaps are modelled well. It makes sense that if you are doing something that will heat the engine too much (100% throttle is not the normal throttle setting, neither is 110% or "war emergency power"), you will want to open the 'cooling' flaps as much as posssible, but as you guessed, there is a trade-off in drag. if you can get away with full power for a while with the flaps less open, and it causes less drag, you may have a benefit for a short time. Also, 100% throttle and 100% propeller pitch does not equal best speed. The sim allows you to play with engine rpms via prop speed and throttle settings. Who knows, you may find a great cooling flap/power/pitch combo that gives you a very good blend of available power, speed, and cooling ability. I have not found this magic combo yet http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
2. Armor flaps...I really don't know and never bothered to find out what planes benefit from armor flaps, but cowl flaps, now...there are two engine types in Il2FB: liquid cooled, and air cooled. The Liquid cooled type is very similar to a car engine, and uses a radiator (or maybe more than one). The radial engine is different. It is typically a one or two bank or 'row' engine, with the cylinders arranged radially from the center. More rows are possible and common, of course. Air cools this type. The cowl flaps allow more air flow, effectually, and like radiator flaps, cause drag.
3. Combat flaps. The trouble is this: you don't just use them whenever you're in combat. "Combat" flaps are nothing more than the standard flap, in most cases, but they are positioned to a smaller degree angle than say, take-off flaps. Like other lift generating devices (like the leading edge slats in some aircraft), these lower your stall speed, in effect. they do however cause drag. Combat flaps may be useful, or worse than useless, depending on your situation. Generally used in very tight, slow turns, so you don't 'drop a wing', or spin.
4. Trim is a useful thing. Without it, you will find you are often fighting the stick just to fly straight and level. Trim is also useful if say, a wing is damaged. Like for a real pilot, trim adjustments are made fairly often in FB. Without some trim, the tendency for the average FB plane is to nose up a lot, without you making a control input. Countering that with just the control stick may cause unacceptable drag from your control surfaces (elevators)
5. There is an optimum fuel mixture, depending on altitude. Mixture refers to air/fuel mixture. Fuel needs to be atomised properly, and in the correct ratio. A supercharger is a mechanical device that in it's classic form uses engine revolution to turn an impeller that 'packs' more air into the combustion chambers. In theory, any internal combustion engine can be thought of as an air pump. The more efficiently you get more air into, and out of, the engine, the more power. the supercharger makes the intake charge at a pressure greater than atmospheric, especially important at high altitudes. WEP is War Emergency Power. This is functionally the ability to go past 100% on the throttle.
6. prop pitch can be used to get power, but you must bear in mind the engine's rpm limits. In general, Allied aircraft use almost a prop pitch governor, while Axis planes seem to have more of a 'true' pitch setting. Prop pitch is a complex issue, I couldn't hope to fully describe it here, I'm typing enough as it is http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
7. magneto- you don't really need to check mag drop, or even worry about the electrical system. Just enable auto-start (default key should be "I"). feathering the propeller is used only if the engine dies. It minimises drag. Locking the tail wheel is good for landing and taking off. Gunsight adjustment is possible with the K-14 sight, available in the YP-80 and the P-51D-20. You must define keystrokes for them. (Shift+F1 is the standard gunsight toggle, most useful in German aircraft to allow you to see the sight correctly)
8. Expansion capability, most likely



These are very general answers, of course. I need a beer now http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

*****************************
Wave bub-bub-bub-bye to the boss, it's your profit, it's his loss~ Clash

Spinne_3.-JG51
03-12-2004, 04:26 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hrvojej:
Hi all.

I am new to the IL-FB, and new to the flight sims in general. I've been training for a couple of days with dumbed-down settings to get a feel for the joystick etc., and now I want to up the realism for practice before I go into the campaign on full-real. But, there are a few things that I don't understand, and the manual is not really helpful in those aspects. So, I was wondering whether someone would be so kind to clarify a few things for me, as it's hard for me to judge most of them due to my inexperience.

1. Engines: I assume that open radiator flaps increase drag and slow the plane down, but why are there several settings for them? Is there a point in using those intermediate settings, or does it makes sense to just use full open and full closed settings? Are the intermediate levels modeled correctly in terms of cooling and drag?

2. Cowl flaps and armor flaps: What do these do, and how do I know which planes have them? When to use them?

3. I still don't see a point in using combat flaps over raised flaps, as it seems that I only lose speed and gain nothing. But I guess there must be a point to them, so could someone please explain what it is?

4. What do the trimming settings for rudder etc. do? Can I do the trimming on all planes to get their ascribed benefits?

5. Why would I want to have certain percentages of mixtures? What's the benefit/cost for having 10% mixture vs. 60% mixture? Also, what's the difference between mixture, supercharger, and WEP?

6. I assume propeller pitch has to be turned down with a decrease in power so the engine doesn't overheat. Are there any other uses for it, such as increasing performance with some special settings?

7. What are the uses for the two magneto settings, feather propeller, and locking tail wheel? Which planes use those? Also, it says in the control list that I can adjust gunsight along with the bombsight, but I've never been able to do that?

8. Why are there keys to toggle up to 8 engines and 10 crewmembers, while the most I've been able to see were 4 engines and 6 crew? Am I missing something, and I can actually fly some other bombers than those in the training missions (which is something I'd like very much)?

Quite a few questions - hopefully somebody will be kind enough to answer.

Cheers,<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I hope this helps.

1.The intermediate radiator settings are modelled correctly. You use them if you need to cool the engine while still maintaining speed. Full radiators would cause you to loose speed too fast, which could kill you( say if you're running away from a furball). You can also use the intermediate settings to cool your engine off at high alts where you don't want the drag of using fulll open radiators.

2.You'll have to look it up on a per-aircraft basis. None of the planes that I fly regularly have 'em, so I'm not sure.

3.Combat flaps help you bleed speed and give you a lot of increased lift, which is very useful when you're in a turning fight with a more agile, slower opponent. They're also useful in the initial phase of the landing when you're dropping too fast because you've lost speed. To sum it up, combat flaps decrease your speed somewhat, but they generate a lot of lift, overcomming the speed loss disadvantage.

4.The plane has to have trim tabs for you to be able to use them. Rudder trimming is useful on single engined props with lots of torque. You can trim the rudder so that the plane flies in level flight without your having to use the rudder constantly to conpensate for the torque.

5.At higher alts, the air is much thinner, leading to partial combustion in the engine because there's too much fuel. This leads to a black smoke trail behind your aircraft, and it wastes fuel. Decrease the richness of the mixture to get rid of the smoke trail. At low alts you can boost the mixture to get added power. A supercharger compresses the air entering the mixer, allowing for an increase in engine power at high alts. Superchargers are used once the aircraft has crossed a certain altitude, because they do not offer an increase in power at lower altitudes. All Luftwaffe and most mid-late war planes have automatic superchargers that you don't worry about. WEP injects a 50-50 mixture of Methanol (CH3OH) and water into the mixture. Methanol is a better fuel, and the water helps keep the engine cool because methanol burns at a higher temp than regular avaiation spirit.

6.Actually, you've got it backwards. The higher the prop pitch, the smaller the angle the prop blades are biting into the air with. When you reduce power, you must increase the prop pitch, otherwise, the blades would encounter too much resistance cutting through the air, resulting in a drop in rpms. Increase power, and you'd wanter lower the prop pitch to make the blades cut through the air at a larger angle, moving a larger mass of air and so generating more thrust. If you leave the prop pitch unchanged, you risk over-revving your engine, resulting in engine failure.

7.Megnetos are basically dynamos, if that helps any. They are used to generate the electricity to power the spark-plugs in the engine. Quite frankly, I've found no use for turning my magnetos off at any point, except possibly when I'm on the ground, for appearences sake.
Feathering props rediuces the AoA of the prop blades to zero, so they cause minimal drag. You'd do this only if the engine stops working on a multi-engined bomber.
Locking the tail wheel helps you maintain a steady course ,during take-off ,once you've taxied onto the take-off strip.
I've never adjusted the gunsight either, so I can't help you there.

8. The keys are there for compatibility reasons. In the future, if Oleg decides to give us an 8 engined aircraft with 10 crew-positions, he'd like to able to do so without having to rewrite all his engine modelling code, a perfectly reasonable thing to do. So ignore the extra engine toggle switches and the extra crew positions, and hoe that Oleg gives us an 8-engined plane.

If anyone finds any of the answers inaccurate, please feel free to correct me.

http://www.student.richmond.edu/~vk5qa/images/forumsig.jpg

"Come on in, I'll treat you nice! I used to know your father."

Chuck_Older
03-12-2004, 04:39 PM
Just a clarification or two- Methanol is not avaliable on every aircraft, but almost all have some sort of boost. WEP is technically only a US aircraft system, if I recall correctly.

You literally had to break a saftey wire with the throttle to go past '100%' power and use WEP.

Water injection basically allows you to utilise a more advantageous spark curve without experiencing detonation. It is worth noting that injection systems have a finite amount of fuel or water, or what have you.

I agree with your explanations, however, Spinne http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

*****************************
Wave bub-bub-bub-bye to the boss, it's your profit, it's his loss~ Clash

03-12-2004, 07:48 PM
Thanks for the quick and exhaustive answers. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I do, however, have a few additional questions, as it's always the case.

3. Why is increased lift important exactly? Because it decreases the stall speed, or does it (and combat flaps) increase maneuverability as well, like turning rate for example?

4. Trimming. I've tried it, but since there's no feedback to tell me what I'm doing, or whether I'm doing it at all (something like the blue messages that are there for everything else), I'm really not sure about it. I've noticed that the planes had the tendency to move up and to the side and not fly straight in general, but I thought it was due to my poor flying skills... But now it would seem as a very important part of setting up the plane, so I was wondering could anybody give me a quick guide on when to do it (immediately after take-off?), and how to do it properly. I know that the end result has to be the plane that flies straight and level, but how do I know it's not due to my imperfect positioning/turbulence/etc.? And how can I tell which planes (and plane types) can make a use of it at all?

5. Ah, so the mixture actually refers to the regular air/fuel mixture, not the boosts (which I assume are either on or off). Thanks. So, I guess the default during take-off is a 100% mixture, and then I can lower it on higher altitudes to get a better performance and save fuel, while turning it back to 100% on lower altitudes, right? And how do I know when to switch, when the plane starts to leave the smoke trail?

6. So, in essence, I always want to keep the rpm constant by offsetting throttle with prop. pitch, or does it depend on what I want to do? Is the dependence of overheating on rpm and prop. pitch in fact modeled in the game?

And an additional question: Is there a way to easily practice landings? For take-offs, I've been practicing on starting the single missions (which is also not ideal as I can't choose the plane type), but it would be great if there is a way that I can practice landings in a way that is shown in the training: starting about 5km away from the airport and landing on it. I was hoping that this could be set up by turning on landings/take-offs in the quick mission builder, but unfortunatelly I always start in the air and far away from the airport.

Once again, thank you very much for your replies. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

[This message was edited by hrvojej on Fri March 12 2004 at 06:56 PM.]

03-12-2004, 08:03 PM
Oh, and one more question: Are droptanks an additional fuel source, or a version of bombs? Is there a place where I can check out what various types of bombs are and when to use a particular type?

Thanks.

HH Quazi
03-12-2004, 08:09 PM
Welcome to the world of flight sims and to the community. I can answer ther first question above this post. Combat flaps are used for both stretching the stall speeds and manuverability in combat. Actually when landing, deploying your landing flaps allow you to have more control over your a/c while at slow speeds for landing. Personally, I'll deploy combat flaps to help make a tight turn then raise them up either after I make the turn or if my speed (energy) loss is to great to be in a tight turn.

Mixture has to do with altitude. The higher you are, the less oxygen there is to mix with the fuel to burn, so you lean the mixture out, so as not to choke the engine by feeding it more fuel than it can burn with the available oxygen at higher altitudes. This is something I should pay more attention to myself. I find that most of my encounters are at less that 3000 meters anyway. Good Luck! S!

Spinne_3.-JG51
03-13-2004, 07:05 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hrvojej:
Thanks for the quick and exhaustive answers. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I do, however, have a few additional questions, as it's always the case.

3. Why is increased lift important exactly? Because it decreases the stall speed, or does it (and combat flaps) increase maneuverability as well, like turning rate for example?

4. Trimming. I've tried it, but since there's no feedback to tell me what I'm doing, or whether I'm doing it at all (something like the blue messages that are there for everything else), I'm really not sure about it. I've noticed that the planes had the tendency to move up and to the side and not fly straight in general, but I thought it was due to my poor flying skills... But now it would seem as a very important part of setting up the plane, so I was wondering could anybody give me a quick guide on when to do it (immediately after take-off?), and how to do it properly. I know that the end result has to be the plane that flies straight and level, but how do I know it's not due to my imperfect positioning/turbulence/etc.? And how can I tell which planes (and plane types) can make a use of it at all?

5. Ah, so the mixture actually refers to the regular air/fuel mixture, not the boosts (which I assume are either on or off). Thanks. So, I guess the default during take-off is a 100% mixture, and then I can lower it on higher altitudes to get a better performance and save fuel, while turning it back to 100% on lower altitudes, right? And how do I know when to switch, when the plane starts to leave the smoke trail?

6. So, in essence, I always want to keep the rpm constant by offsetting throttle with prop. pitch, or does it depend on what I want to do? Is the dependence of overheating on rpm and prop. pitch in fact modeled in the game?

And an additional question: Is there a way to easily practice landings? For take-offs, I've been practicing on starting the single missions (which is also not ideal as I can't choose the plane type), but it would be great if there is a way that I can practice landings in a way that is shown in the training: starting about 5km away from the airport and landing on it. I was hoping that this could be set up by turning on landings/take-offs in the quick mission builder, but unfortunatelly I always start in the air and far away from the airport.

Once again, thank you very much for your replies. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

[This message was edited by hrvojej on Fri March 12 2004 at 06:56 PM.]<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ok, here's my take. As always, feel free to correct me if you think I'm wrong.

1. To understand 'Lift' you need to realise the importance of energy. Think of energy as a currency. At any point you have a certain amount of energy, given by your airspeed and altitude (KE and PE for the physicists here). Every move that you make is a trade in this currency, for example, a hard turn or a climb. You can gain more energy by either flying faster (by diving or by increasing throttle/decreasing prop pitch or both), or by slowly climbing while maintaining your airspeed. Technically, 'Lift' is a force, the force that allows you to leave the ground in the first place. the more lift you have, the easier it is for you to climb, or maintain your altitude. Lift is directly related to the size of the wing surface and the cross-sectional shape of the wing. I can't be any more precise here, because this concept is best illustrated by a graphic. Anyway, the larger the wing-surface a plane has, the more lift it can generate, and thus climb faster. So more lift gives you the much needed currency of energy. Flaps increase the wing-surface and increase the cross-sectional performance of the wing shape, but they do so at the penalty of increased drag, reducing your airspeed. Thus, what you need is a trade off. When you want to fly fast and climb little, you don't use flaps. When you want to gain a lot of altitude quickly in a shallow climb, you use flaps (e.g. when you're taking off). Turning rate is related to your speed. The faster you're moving, the slower you turn, just like when you run, or cycle. In a combat situation, when you and the opponent are manuvering hard, you'd like to be able to do two things - turn faster than the enemy, and be able to gain altitude if necessary. So flaps (combat flaps) give you an icrease in lift, while at the same time, dropping your airspeed, allowing you to turn better and quickly disengage by gaining altitude if your situation becomes unfavourable. Lift does decrease the stall speed as well, allowing you to fly on the 'edge'. Hopefuly, your plane has a better design than your enemies plane, so that he can't match your manuvers.

2. Trimming is a constant process. You trim every time you're not in combat. Trim depends on your airspeed. So, as your speed increases, your plane's nose tends to pitch up, and you've to adjust trim to compensate. The way you put this into practice is by deciding what your desired altitude and airspeed are for the leg of the journey you're on. Once you reach that altitude, you trim your aircraft so that it flies level, and then you reduce throttle until the nose no longer pitches up. You can also use trim to increas your rate of climb or descent, by trimming your aircraft so that the nose points slightly up or down. The best way to test if your aircraft is trimmed is to leave the joystick for a few seconds and see if the aircraft continues to fly nearly level and straight. The level of trimming achieved this way should be suffecient (it woorks for me!).

3.You're absolutely correct here. The best way to find out is by switching externals on and simply seeing if you leave a smoke trail. Remember, it's very easy to spot a smoke trail, especially at high altitudes, so you really don't want to leave a smoke trail behind you for people to spot.

4.The dependanc of overheating on rpm and prop pitch is modelled in the game, and I think it's pretty accurate. The amount of thrust the engine generates is given by the amount of air the engine flings back. The amount of air the engine flings back is governed by the angle at which the prop blades cut the air, the higher the angle, the more air the blades are pushing back. The rpms decide how many times the blades can cut through the air every second. When you decrease the prop pitch, the blades start throwing more air back, but after a point, the air starts exterting too great a force on the engine, causing it to under-rev. In essence, you're overloading the engine. What you want to do is decrease prop pitch so that the blades throw the max amount of air back without over-loading the engine. A good example is a car. On a proper road, the wheels spin at a certain rpm. but if the car gets stuck in mud, the wheels spin without driving the car forward, and it puts a strain on the engine. You can easily find recommended rpm for a given engine/plane for different purposes - e.g. cruising rpms, take-off rpms, combat rpms etc... To sum up, when you're cruising to your target, you want to maintain cruising rpms at a low throttle setting to conserve fuel. Under combat conditions, you want to find that sweet spot where you're pushing the max amout of air back, at a high throttle setting. This will give you max power. On Luftwaffe aircraft, the prop-pitch is automatically controlled by a mechanism. The performance is very good, but it's not the best possible. Some experienced Luftwaffe pilots prefer to use manual prop pitch to get the best possible performance out of thier engines.

5. If you know how to use the Full Mission Builder, you can easily set up a quick training mission in which you take-off, circle the airfield and land. I've got some such missions set up for practice, and I'd be happy to pass them onto you if you like.

6. Droptanks are an additional fuel source. However, they generate drag and add weight to the aircraft, so typically, you use drop tanks to get to your target, and then you drop (throw) them away. There are a bunch of good sites on the net where you find out some more about the bombs available for a given airforce. People are always posting titbits about ordinances, so just keep scanning the threads. Usually, bombs have a two/three letter designation, followed by a number. The letters indicate the type of the bomb (general-purpose, anti-armour etc...) while the number is the weight of the explosive material.

Hope this helps. If you're interested in getting the most out of this sim, you should join a squad. Squads allow you to share experience and knowledge, and it's a lot of fun flying with real people that you know personally. You can check my squad out at www.jg51.com (http://www.jg51.com) Since the AEP, we've unofficially added the Go-229, the He-162 and the Me-163 to our list of official aircraft.

http://www.student.richmond.edu/~vk5qa/images/forumsig.jpg

"Come on in, I'll treat you nice! I used to know your father."

SeaFireLIV
03-13-2004, 07:42 AM
I really respect your wish to start on Full Real settings, but I would advise not to! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif A lot of people would jump in horror because i go on so much about playing with real settings.
But I say this because you say you`re very new to flight sims in general, so if I were you I`d start with these settings...
Everything real but have these activated:

Icons on: You can then use the icon key to fly as you can handle. Configure a button to it and as you get used to no icons on just tap the key to adjust to no icons at all. A good way to progress to no icons.

Padlock: Padlock will help you follow targets if you`re new. Assign to a button, once you are proficient you don`t need to use. (Hint: If you have an AI wingman who is new he will not respond to a bogey on your six sometimes. Padlock the bogey on your six and order your wingman to attack. Later they`ll do it by themselves.

No Instant Mission Success: Make sure this is switched to OFF, the title is misleading. It`s more realistic off. If you die, get captured you will still fail.

No minimapPath: Saves frustration in finding where you are, until proficient ( I still use this).

Speedbar: So you can see your important settings easily. I actually don`t use this any more, preferring the cockpit dials. I`ve heard that in AEP (the add-on), that the Spitfire has a little TRIM indicater too. If this is true then it`s even better than the HUD since that doesn`t actually indicate your trim.

External views: Your choice. I have it on, because if I crashland or am on a particularly long mission, I can view my friendlies aircraft and enjoy the graphics. I also use it at the start of a mission to get an overview on my runway of the aircraft composition- in reality you`d see your line up before getting in the cockpit right?

NEVERs:

NEVER start with unlimited ammo, no cockpit, no engine management (this is quite forgiving), etc: These wil lead to bad habits and be a disadvantage that you will find hard to tear yourself away from later.


That`s it for now. I could say much more, but I think you`re probably suffring from something called `Too Much Information` by now anyway! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

(EDIT: Maybe you could fly with stalls/spins off... I don`t think I`d ever have moved on to realistic settings without this... In the beginning I found it ver frustrating stalling out and not knowing why... up to you).

SeaFireLIV...

http://img12.photobucket.com/albums/v31/SeaFireLIV/storm.jpg
Soon... Very soon....

[This message was edited by SeaFireLIV on Sat March 13 2004 at 06:52 AM.]

Chuck_Older
03-13-2004, 08:59 AM
Some good suggestions http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif



hrvojej:

One very important thing I forgot to add before-
It would help if we knew what aircraft you are flying. You will want to pick one and stick with it at first, because the flight characteristics of the various aircraft are different enough to cause trouble with learning how to do some of these things if you just swap from plane to plane.

*****************************
Wave bub-bub-bub-bye to the boss, it's your profit, it's his loss~ Clash

03-13-2004, 01:29 PM
Wow, so many helpful people! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Thank you all very much for your answers and tips.

Ok, I think I understand the lift/flaps and mixture settings now, and yesterday I discovered how easy it is to use the FMB to set up take-off and landing practice missions, which is what I've been doing ever since (thanks for the offer btw).

I guess that adjusting pitch and throttle to get the best rpms, and knowing what the best rpms are, takes a lot of practice and experience, and therefore although I'm not sure how to go about it yet, I would say I understand enough to try to experiment myself. Once I get over the inexperience barrier and get more feel for the plane(s) and engines, I guess I'll be able to do it properly.

Trimming is still very hard for me to do, because I still don't know whether the plane is not flying level and straight because I wasn't able to manually bring it to that point, or because it's off by itself and needs adjusting. I can feel that I get more resistance when diving than when climbing, for example, but how to find the proper setting, without any graphical crutch that gives me feedback, is something I cannot do as of yet. I don't know, maybe I'll be able to do that as well later on. Is there a way to tell which planes allow for this adjustment, or perhaps there are planes that do this automatically (even though it's a dynamic process)?

As for the ordinance, yes, I was thinking whether there is a way to find out what the letter abreviations are for bombs, but I guess I'll find that out by trial and error as well.

As for my settings, so far I've disabled torque & gyro and complex engine, and this is something I'm about to begin practicing now. I switch icons on and off, as suggested, I have the speedbar on for now, I don't use padlock but rather use external views if I get really lost. I also use externals sometimes because they are nice, and not as a crutch - to enjoy the view, so I don't think I'll disable them even when I won't need them. I always fly with limited ammo and fuel, but that's not a problem in quick missions either, and have cockpit always on, as well as spins & stalls.

I started flying on Bf-109 series, as this is something I want to fly and a plane used in a lot of campaigns, but then I switched to Yak-3, which is what I've been practicing on now. I find it much simpler to control, and easier to see what's going on since there's no gunsight-to-the-right view. It seems reliable, good performing, and above all intuitive to control. And I don't get splashed with oil every time a bomber fires a few shots at me... I've also found that P-38 is very slick to control. Are there better choices to practice?

Thanks for the offer for the squadron, but I don't think I'll be flying online. I have 56k, and I am generally more interested in offline gaming - less stress involved, and since I use the games to relax, offline is better suited for my purpose.

And finally, a question about the QMB and the AI. It seems that rookie AI loses interest in fight very quickly, and just continues on its route, both hostiles and my wingmen - they often ignore enemy planes and just do nothing. On the other hand, I get nailed pretty quickly by the average AI, so I don't get the chance to do much flying in the process. I've been setting up mostly 4vs.4 battles, or 4vs.4 bombers and 4 escorts, but it feels like I could be doing better for my practice runs. Any suggestions on what AI and numerical settings to use as a newbie?

Cheers,

[This message was edited by hrvojej on Sat March 13 2004 at 12:44 PM.]

Chuck_Older
03-13-2004, 02:14 PM
I beleive that the AI loses interest because of simulated fatigue? I don't know for sure, but they don't seen as aggressive in general. I'd still use rookie level, but consider turning vulnerability off until you have a chance against them. A note on skill level- AI marksmanship goes up as well, as skill goes up

Set up a QMB mission flying against C-47s. I think they have zero armament (almost positive), and they are nice, big juicy targets.


As an FYI:

some of your trim concerns and troubles come from the fact that most if not all the Bf-109 series has at least some of the trim set on the ground, and is not changeable in flight- nothing you can do.
To see if you are changing trim-
select a plane with an artificial horizon. use the control stick to fly level. Play with the elevator trim while holding the stick steady in level flight. Don't move the stick. If you begin a climb or a dive, you're probably changing elevator trim http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

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Wave bub-bub-bub-bye to the boss, it's your profit, it's his loss~ Clash

JZG_Winter
03-13-2004, 04:20 PM
Just one point from me. DON'T put off flying online just because you have a 56k modem. a lot of people fly with 56k or less.

What I would say, is get used to the sim before venturing online, as a lot of human guys are less forgiving than AI http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I personally only fly online, but a lot of guys prefer offline only..The beauty of this game is however you want to fly, and with whatever settings, there is something there in the game for you.

Keep asking questions, the community here really are helpful (well, most of them http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif )

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