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View Full Version : Why do the Novels do the Kenway Family more justice than the Game ( SPOILERS )



MasterAssasin84
02-22-2014, 04:33 PM
After reading Forsaken and now i am halfway through Black Flag i am finding that i am more connected to the Kenway family through the Books rather than the actual games ?

Black Flag has thus far been an exciting read ! And i was immersed in the fact that Edward had already made up his mind that he was on the side of the Assassins Rather than the Templars very early in Havana due to his un knowing brush with them in his home town of Swansea ? after they was responsible for burning his fathers homestead and sheep farm to the ground i really felt that the book addressed lots of questions i had about Edward as i did with Haytham ?

Anyone here not notice this ?

dbzk1999
02-22-2014, 06:29 PM
It doesn't because u probably not it all those events into one game with the novels the author follows the story but he's also allowed to add his own bit

A sort of "free reign"

STDlyMcStudpants
02-22-2014, 09:08 PM
Simply more creative freedom.
Game developing has it's constraints, especially in yearly releases (AC would need 3 teams at least to buff up their story telling)
It's much easier to put detail into a book that doesnt have to be animated.

GunnerGalactico
02-22-2014, 09:28 PM
I feel that the books give a better understanding of the plot and characters. It also explains everything in better detail and all the dialogue that was cut from AC3 is included in the book.

frodrigues55
02-22-2014, 09:56 PM
Well... books in general tend to tell stories better than other medias because that's the only reason why they exist lol :p

How many books-turned-into-films are worse than the movies? Not much, I guess.

IThat's because there's a number of things books allow that other medias don't - especially because it can be a lot more explict on details and character's thoughts and point of views. Visual media relies more on the viewer's perception (or else, it ends up explaning too much out loud to make the same point, which is always weird).

Besides, the game is not just for telling a story, it has to do much more than the plot - especially gameplay, since that's the primary goal of a game - with a fixed amount of money and a fixed amount of time.

They just don't really compare.

Though I wish they would come up with a game covering the same points and expanding a little bit of the Kenways story presented in the books.

Farlander1991
02-22-2014, 10:20 PM
I haven't read neither Forsaken nor the Black Flag novel, so I can't answer your question. I feel like the games do great justice to the Kenway family.

But hearing that Edward was involved with Templars before he first saw them in the game really baffles me and to me is a really bad move. I think it's much better when Edward didn't have absolutely, even unknowing, involvement with the Templars.

And regarding Haytham, I never got the sentiment of 'I MUST know what happened with him before Connor meets him'. I could see that he's changed, but then again you know that some **** has happened, we meet him at a point where almost half of his life passes and he's not that much closer to complete his dream, to the point that he just mutilates one of his comrades for being, at least partially and recently, responsible for that. To me that was enough to go on, I don't really think that the stuff that happened behind the scenes has made Haytham that much deeper.

frodrigues55
02-22-2014, 10:42 PM
And regarding Haytham, I never got the sentiment of 'I MUST know what happened with him before Connor meets him'. I could see that he's changed, but then again you know that some **** has happened, we meet him at a point where almost half of his life passes and he's not that much closer to complete his dream, to the point that he just mutilates one of his comrades for being, at least partially and recently, responsible for that. To me that was enough to go on, I don't really think that the stuff that happened behind the scenes has made Haytham that much deeper.

Reading about Haytham's life before Connor wasn't that interesting to me either, to be honest. But the part of the book that develops his childhood was such a work of beauty that it certainly deserves a look.

I never wanted to know about him either, but the way they told what kind of relationship he had with Edward, his family and friends during his childhood really talked to me. His childhood was tragic and innocent at the same time. I felt for him - and the scene leading up to Edward's murder was really well written.

I want to see that in a game so bad :(

Didn't really read Black Flag yet and I hated the other books (the ones I read anyway).

guardian_titan
02-23-2014, 05:24 AM
The books have the ability to weave in scenes often omitted from the games and also give you more insight into characters. In Forsaken, you can see how torn Haytham was with Connor and that he did care for his son while in the game that wasn't very obvious. It's hardly hinted at in the game. Forsaken certainly makes Haytham more understandable. Since games can't really let us get a view into a character's "soul" unless they monologue a LOT, often a lot of potential character development is left out. In books, this is a non-issue ... depending on the POV. This is also true of movies. In visual media, the only inference we can make into a person's thoughts is how they react, and often that can be up to interpretation. First person books also leave something to be desired when it comes to what the other characters are thinking, but it still allows for more insight into the main character that visual media can't do. Monologues get old rather quickly.
It would be nice to get a novel from Connor's POV, but then I realized something: Connor doesn't use contractions at all (or rather very rarely) in his speech so you'd think he'd do the same in his writing. Thus a book written by Connor would likely get rather frustrating to read because you'd think it was written by a robot ... or a second grader. A book from his POV would certainly fill in gaps to his character much like how Forsaken and AC4's novel filled in gaps for Haytham and Edward. Issue is, how to write it and remain true to his speech style without annoying people reading it. I'd bet that's one of the reasons why Haytham was picked for the AC3 novel over Connor. Although I'm sure the main reason was likely because Haytham had so little screen time compared to his son and likely won't see more.

Farlander1991
02-23-2014, 09:47 AM
In Forsaken, you can see how torn Haytham was with Connor and that he did care for his son while in the game that wasn't very obvious.

I don't know, I guess you can say it's open to interpretation (but then again, we're talking about the series which pretty much says that everything's open to interpretation ;) ), but it seems pretty obvious. From the little things like making sure the mercenary suit sits tight on him to bigger things like the look of 'OMFG what've I done' devastation on his face when Connor scorns him for withholding information to the final death speech where 'I should've killed you long ago' is as close to 'I love you' as Haytham could possibly say given all the circumstances.

SixKeys
02-23-2014, 04:59 PM
And i was immersed in the fact that Edward had already made up his mind that he was on the side of the Assassins Rather than the Templars very early in Havana due to his un knowing brush with them in his home town of Swansea ? after they was responsible for burning his fathers homestead and sheep farm to the ground i really felt that the book addressed lots of questions i had about Edward as i did with Haytham ?


I haven't read the books, but this practice lately of trying to tie the assassins and Templars into EVERYTHING really annoys me. Why did it have to be Templars who were responsible for the farm burning? Why not just a random act of hooliganism? Why did Haytham have to be brainwashed from a child to become a Templar? Why couldn't he have grown up not knowing anything about either group and then make up his own mind? They keep harping on about moral greyness between the two ideologies, and then go and make Templars responsible for basically everything bad that's ever happened, ever.

Shahkulu101
02-23-2014, 05:10 PM
I haven't read the books, but this practice lately of trying to tie the assassins and Templars into EVERYTHING really annoys me. Why did it have to be Templars who were responsible for the farm burning? Why not just a random act of hooliganism? Why did Haytham have to be brainwashed from a child to become a Templar? Why couldn't he have grown up not knowing anything about either group and then make up his own mind? They keep harping on about moral greyness between the two ideologies, and then go and make Templars responsible for basically everything bad that's ever happened, ever.

I agree. The philosophical dialogue has always felt arbitrary to me - they can rationalize it anyway they want - but they are quite simply bad people. I guess the Assassin's are too but I need to be able to sympathize with both sides.

I mean AC3 has some brilliant dialogue but am I going to sympathize with a bunch of guys who stumble across an innocent six year old kid in the forest and beat, strangle and knock him out with a musket? Absolutely not.

Their attempts to give players a motivation for actions against the Templar's and antagonize them always clashes with the morally grey side of things. Look at the Charles Lee in the beginning and then the COMPLETELY different Charles Lee when we move on to Connor's story.

I-Like-Pie45
02-23-2014, 05:13 PM
kids are annoying

I would sympathize with people who beat them up for no reason

SixKeys
02-23-2014, 06:42 PM
I mean AC3 has some brilliant dialogue but am I going to sympathize with a bunch of guys who stumble across an innocent six year old kid in the forest and beat, strangle and knock him out with a musket? Absolutely not.


Right? That was so unnecessary too, and out-of-character. First we see Charles as good-humored and quite self-controlled, the next moment he's beating up little kids in the woods for no reason. They still could have made him racist if they wanted to (even though in reality he had a Mohawk wife and kids), just not on a "kick the puppy" level. He could have just been snide and condescending towards Connor but not beat him over the head with a musket. That would have been much more in line with what we saw of him earlier.

Anyway, point being, I want to see an assassin doing morally reprehensible things for a change. Just because they're champions of liberty doesn't mean they can't ever be bad people. And I don't mean "oh, he was really a traitor all along, that explains it" like Al Mualim or Duncan Walpole. I mean an assassin who does bad things whilst being loyal to the Creed. Kind of like Alta´r when he started out but on a deeper level.

frodrigues55
02-23-2014, 06:48 PM
I didn't mind Lee's change of character, but come to think about it, you guys are right. He just became a bad person period, so all the beautiful dialogue didn't really matter. You guys kinda ruined it for me now lol, I never noticed this obvious contradiction before.

Regarding the books -

I think Haytham's "adoption" by the templars made sense, as his father was an active figure amongst them and an Assassin after all. I think the book filled the gaps nicely. I didn't read Black Flag yet, however, I do agree that any previous enconter between the templars and Edward sounds forced. The game has found a nice way for that first encounter, it didn't need any more than that.