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dogdad
07-25-2004, 11:27 PM
I am trying to take off in the N2 IL2 but the brakes don't stop the plane from vering off the runway.I saw some comments about locking the tail wheel. Is that the solution? How do I do it? I'm using a Cyborg Evo and am an absolute (54 year old) beginner Thanks

dogdad
07-25-2004, 11:27 PM
I am trying to take off in the N2 IL2 but the brakes don't stop the plane from vering off the runway.I saw some comments about locking the tail wheel. Is that the solution? How do I do it? I'm using a Cyborg Evo and am an absolute (54 year old) beginner Thanks

HangerQueen
07-25-2004, 11:33 PM
You need to go into the keyboard control section and assign a key to wheel lock.

Also, when taking off, you need to apply some rudder to counteract the effect of engine torque. For some excellent articles on flight controls, go to the simHQ website (simhq.com) and look for some articles by Andy Bush.

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Alexander_Seil
07-25-2004, 11:41 PM
I've got a question about that, actually. What EXACTLY does the tailwheel lock do to the tailwheel? In what way does it restrict it? Also, does it need to be unlocked at landing or for taxiing or something like that?

civildog
07-25-2004, 11:54 PM
Locking the tailwheel links it to the rudder pedals. Then when you use the rudder controls it steers the plane.

The tailwheel stays locked throughout the flight so it'll be that way when you land.

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civildog
07-25-2004, 11:56 PM
Also...be aware that some planes (P-39's for instance) don't need the tailwheel locked. They use tricycle gear that is already linked to the rudder pedals.

However, as an important safety tip: as part of my regular preflight I ALWAYS lock the tailwheel. Just part of the checklist in case I forget.

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Tully__
07-26-2004, 01:31 AM
I never lock the tailwheel. Rudder is adequate by itself (or in combination with brakes when taxiing).

Incidetally I was under the impression that locking the tailwheel locks it in the "straight ahead" position, at least on most aircraft. I know that's the case on real Texans. When you lock the wheel on those, it continues to swing free until it passes through the straight ahead position, at which point the lock engages and it no longer swivels.

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TX-EcoDragon
07-26-2004, 01:37 AM
In some tailwheel designs the tailwheel is free castering, in other words, not linked to the rudder controls. In this case it can be helpful to lock the tailwheel once lined up for takeoff to prevent excessive amounts of yawing when power is applied (though rudder must still be used to keep her straight!) becasue in this situation the aircraft is accelerating from a stop and at these low speedsthe rudder surface itself is not very effective at counteracting torque, p-factor, and wind effects. In other designs the tailwheel is linked to teh rudder assembly with a bungee, and in this case the wheel may not have a lock, and nor will it need one.

In the sim, without any real torque effects locking the tailwheel is pretty much never required. At least for me. In some of those stiff crosswinds though, it might be helpful even when taxiing!

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WTE_Galway
07-26-2004, 01:37 AM
REAL LIFE

in real life locking the tailwheel locks in the straight ahead position

the purpose of this is to stop prop wash and sudden wind gusts whacking the tail and pushing the tail around liek a weather vane

it is NOT recommended when landing as far as I know in any real aircraft

IN-GAME

agree with Tully about ignoring it EXCEPT for thunderstorms .. locking the tail wheel helps a lot in thunderstorm takeoffs in IL2

civildog
07-26-2004, 01:41 AM
Maybe linking the tailwheel to the rudder controls this way is a game compromise. How it works in the game is all I know or care about since it's the game's rules. I never checked the outside view to see if the wheel moves, though, hmmmm...

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I often think the whole world is out to get me, but then I remember that some of the smaller nations are neutral.

58th AVG "WannaBees" ...We fly where the angels fear to tread!

ELEM
07-26-2004, 01:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CivilDog:
Locking the tailwheel links it to the rudder pedals. Then when you use the rudder controls it steers the plane.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Just the opposite actually! The tail wheel is normally only attached to the rudder via springs which allow the wheel to "catch up" with rudder input. Locking the tailwheel fixes it in the straight forward direction and is a slight aid in the early take off roll until airflow over the rudder gives full yawing authority. Rudder is the principle means of staying straight on take off. You should not be using brakes to try and stay straight.

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civildog
07-26-2004, 01:47 AM
As long as I lock the tailwheel I get in the air faster and land straighter (unless crabbing into a storm or because of damage) without bouncing off the roofs of the buildings alongside the runways. That's good enough for me.

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I often think the whole world is out to get me, but then I remember that some of the smaller nations are neutral.

58th AVG "WannaBees" ...We fly where the angels fear to tread!

WTE_Galway
07-26-2004, 01:57 AM
Ok

I stand corrected on the landing statement

in real aircraft with non steering tailwheels it apparently IS recommended to lock the wheel