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View Full Version : ATTN: Hunde_3.JG/51 re: He-162



FW190fan
03-06-2004, 09:53 AM
Hey Kyrule, I thought you might find this interesting concerning Eric Brown's report on the He-162.

There seems to be some myths out there WRT airframe stability/structural strength etc. So, just some quick things from the report:

- very stable in the climb
- harmony of control excellent
- touchy rudders
- excellent directional snaking
- best gun platform of it's day (jets)
- at 30,000ft. very good stability and control
- touchy rudder at 30,000ft
- no buffeting or vibration in powered dives
- 400mph roll highest experienced (unboosted)
- delightfully light ailerons/stick force
- "phenominal" roll rate
- powerful elevator
- mild stall charachteristics
- hand cranked flaps http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
- difficult to land (not for rookies)
- a handful to takeoff and land
- care required in use of rudder to assist roll
- exhilerating to fly

These are all points found in "Wings of the Luftwaffe" - basically Brown really praises the aircraft and flew it quite frequently, the only real difficulty being in takeoff and landing.

Despite the reputation of the He-162 being prone to structural failures I know of only two fatal accidents, the prototype which was a problem with the glue and then an overzealous British pilot in a low-level roll where part of the rudder collapsed.(Compare this to other early jets)

As far as stability is concerned, Brown said "It was soon evident that the Germans had got the original stability problems licked."

that you and those who haven't read Brown's report on the He-162 might find this interesting - it seems to fit in well with what Oleg has mentioned about Russian flight tests with it.

http://people.aero.und.edu/~choma/lrg0645.jpg

FW190fan
03-06-2004, 09:53 AM
Hey Kyrule, I thought you might find this interesting concerning Eric Brown's report on the He-162.

There seems to be some myths out there WRT airframe stability/structural strength etc. So, just some quick things from the report:

- very stable in the climb
- harmony of control excellent
- touchy rudders
- excellent directional snaking
- best gun platform of it's day (jets)
- at 30,000ft. very good stability and control
- touchy rudder at 30,000ft
- no buffeting or vibration in powered dives
- 400mph roll highest experienced (unboosted)
- delightfully light ailerons/stick force
- "phenominal" roll rate
- powerful elevator
- mild stall charachteristics
- hand cranked flaps http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
- difficult to land (not for rookies)
- a handful to takeoff and land
- care required in use of rudder to assist roll
- exhilerating to fly

These are all points found in "Wings of the Luftwaffe" - basically Brown really praises the aircraft and flew it quite frequently, the only real difficulty being in takeoff and landing.

Despite the reputation of the He-162 being prone to structural failures I know of only two fatal accidents, the prototype which was a problem with the glue and then an overzealous British pilot in a low-level roll where part of the rudder collapsed.(Compare this to other early jets)

As far as stability is concerned, Brown said "It was soon evident that the Germans had got the original stability problems licked."

that you and those who haven't read Brown's report on the He-162 might find this interesting - it seems to fit in well with what Oleg has mentioned about Russian flight tests with it.

http://people.aero.und.edu/~choma/lrg0645.jpg

FW190fan
03-06-2004, 09:57 AM
Also Brown was flying a "standard production A-series model" Wnr 120 098 and not one of the protoypes.

http://people.aero.und.edu/~choma/lrg0645.jpg

Zen--
03-06-2004, 10:38 AM
Nice read Fan, I didn't know the 162 was so well regarded actually. Thanks for the information http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

<S!>

-Zen-

BerkshireHunt
03-06-2004, 10:42 AM
I don't think the aircraft can have been quite as forgiving as you seem to suggest- Brown was a very experienced test pilot with thousands of hours on 200 different types- It's doubtful whether any Luftwaffe pilot ever took a He162 up to 30,000 feet for instance, but Brown did because he always tried to push a machine to its limits to ascertain its flight envelope. Over the years he had learned instinctively when to 'back off' and he actually calls the He162 'unforgiving'.
The pilot who was killed, Flt Lt Marks, was using a lot of rudder to assist roll during an aerobatic routine- though Brown had warned him not to. There was obviously some structural weakness in the tailplanes because they subsequently fell off and Marks was killed. This is irrelevant to FB, because it wont be modelled.
However, Marks was not the only one to be bitten by this machine: see this thread at SimHQ re the death toll: http://www.simhq.com/simhq3/sims/boards/bbs/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=98;t=007753

FW190fan
03-06-2004, 11:12 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BerkshireHunt:
I don't think the aircraft can have been quite as forgiving as you seem to suggest<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Sorry, but I didn't write Eric Brown's report - Eric Brown did http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif I'm just the reporter. Oleg has indicated that the Russians found it relatively easy to fly as well.

As far as fatalities are concerned, I was talking of_structural failures_, not pilot inexperience.

http://people.aero.und.edu/~choma/lrg0645.jpg

Hunde_3.JG51
03-06-2004, 11:16 AM
Wow FW-190fan, I'm touched. I lie about rocket loadouts for the 190 and you still help me out http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif.

I appreciate this very much, good read and a real eye opener. And Zen, that is what I was saying in another thread, I didn't know there were so many positive impressions of the Salamander out there. I'm surprised that the He-162 seemed/was regarded as being stable with mild stall characteristics and had light controls. I've really taken to the He-162 in AEP, I just can't enough of flying it and the forward view is outstanding. Acceleration is awesome and you present such a small target.

Thanks again FW-190fan for taking the time, I really appreciate it.

http://www.brooksart.com/Icewarriors.jpg

Formerly Kyrule2
http://www.jg51.com/