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View Full Version : Requiem: US Carrier Losses (lots of pics)



SkyChimp
06-04-2004, 07:02 PM
USS Langley CV-1
March 24, 1920 - February 27, 1942

Our first carrier
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1001.jpg

Later converted to a seaplane tender, then designated USS Langley AV-3
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1002.jpg

Sunk south of Java
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1003.jpg

===================

USS Lexington CV-2
December 14, 1927 - May 8, 1942

The biggest warship in the world
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1004.jpg

A victim of Japanese carrier planes and going down by the bow at Coral Sea
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1005.jpg

The end is near
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1006.jpg

=================

USS Yorktown CV-5
September 30, 1937 - June 7, 1942

The warmest ship in the US Navy
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1007.jpg

Under attack
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1008.jpg

Most of the Japanese dive-bombers that inflicted this damge were obliterated by Yorktown's anti-aircraft fire
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1009.jpg

Leaving her behind
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1010.jpg

Her last breath
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1011.jpg

================

USS Hornet CV-8
October 25, 1941 - October 26, 1942

Great lines
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1012.jpg

Her memorable contribution
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1013.jpg

Under attack
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1014.jpg

Mortal damage at Santa Cruz
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1015.jpg

The last goodbye
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1016.jpg

================

USS WASP CV-7
April 25, 1940 - September 15, 1942

A graceful ship
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1017.jpg

Underway
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1018.jpg

Mortal damage
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1019.jpg

Friends go with her
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1020.jpg

===========

What did I miss?

Regards,
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/dauntless.jpg

[This message was edited by SkyChimp on Fri June 04 2004 at 06:48 PM.]

[This message was edited by SkyChimp on Fri June 04 2004 at 07:32 PM.]

SkyChimp
06-04-2004, 07:02 PM
USS Langley CV-1
March 24, 1920 - February 27, 1942

Our first carrier
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1001.jpg

Later converted to a seaplane tender, then designated USS Langley AV-3
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1002.jpg

Sunk south of Java
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1003.jpg

===================

USS Lexington CV-2
December 14, 1927 - May 8, 1942

The biggest warship in the world
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1004.jpg

A victim of Japanese carrier planes and going down by the bow at Coral Sea
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1005.jpg

The end is near
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1006.jpg

=================

USS Yorktown CV-5
September 30, 1937 - June 7, 1942

The warmest ship in the US Navy
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1007.jpg

Under attack
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1008.jpg

Most of the Japanese dive-bombers that inflicted this damge were obliterated by Yorktown's anti-aircraft fire
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1009.jpg

Leaving her behind
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1010.jpg

Her last breath
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1011.jpg

================

USS Hornet CV-8
October 25, 1941 - October 26, 1942

Great lines
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1012.jpg

Her memorable contribution
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1013.jpg

Under attack
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1014.jpg

Mortal damage at Santa Cruz
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1015.jpg

The last goodbye
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1016.jpg

================

USS WASP CV-7
April 25, 1940 - September 15, 1942

A graceful ship
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1017.jpg

Underway
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1018.jpg

Mortal damage
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1019.jpg

Friends go with her
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/1020.jpg

===========

What did I miss?

Regards,
http://members.cox.net/us.fighters/dauntless.jpg

[This message was edited by SkyChimp on Fri June 04 2004 at 06:48 PM.]

[This message was edited by SkyChimp on Fri June 04 2004 at 07:32 PM.]

arcadeace
06-04-2004, 08:19 PM
Over 5 minutes downloading on my modem, you should have included a Chimp dirge http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/222_1082457373_222_1082441075_airaces.jpg

torquethrottle
06-04-2004, 09:21 PM
What a beautiful group of ladies....Very sad.

Fliger747
06-05-2004, 01:39 AM
A good friend from years ago was on the Hornet (Bosun's Mate) the whole year that she was in comission. A lot of history there!

yerpalal
06-05-2004, 04:58 AM
What about Princeton and the escorts lost during Leyte?

RedDeth
06-05-2004, 12:34 PM
i think the total of american carriers built was about 140? i know it was more than 100 carriers floating outside of japan at wars end. not a bad ratio of losses compared to the japanese carrier losses

www.fighterjocks.net (http://www.fighterjocks.net) home of 12 time Champions AFJ http://www.alloutwar.com/IL2FS/round9.cfm http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/120_1083458407_knightsmove-taylor.jpg

Fliger747
06-05-2004, 07:22 PM
It is amazing that we never lost a single Essex carrier, even though many suffered extensive damage. The USN was good at many things, not as good at some others, but always excelled at damage control. The Essex was designed to overcome vunerabilities of earler designs, and also operate a large air group efficently. Fire fighting especially was the best in the world.

RedDeth
06-06-2004, 02:54 AM
we lost our last CV full size carrier in jan. 1943 after that none. we lost a few small escort carriers.

japan lost 26 carriers including one 70000 ton supercarrier at wars end ten days after it was launched. that had to hurt.

www.fighterjocks.net (http://www.fighterjocks.net) home of 12 time Champions AFJ http://www.alloutwar.com/IL2FS/round9.cfm http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/120_1083458407_knightsmove-taylor.jpg

RedDeth
06-06-2004, 02:55 AM
americas losses.....WORLD WAR II
U.S. NAVY VESSEL LOSSES - BB, CV, CVL, CVE, CA & CL
Vessel, Type, Hull Number Area or Event, Cause*
[see key below] Date of Loss
mm-dd-yy Date Stricken
mm-dd-yy
BATTLESHIPS - BB
Arizona (BB 39) Pearl Harbor, B-T 12-07-41 12-01-42
Oklahoma (BB 37) Pearl Harbor, T 12-07-41 11-22-44
AIRCRAFT CARRIERS - CV
Hornet (CV 8) Santa Cruz, US 10-26-42 01-13-43
Lexington (CV 2) Coral Sea, T 05-08-42 06-24-42
Wasp (CV 7) Solomons, T 09-15-42 11-02-42
Yorktown (CV 5) Midway, T 06-07-42 10-02-42
LIGHT AIRCRAFT CARRIERS - CVL
Princeton (CVL 23) Leyte, B 10-24-44 11-13-44
ESCORT AIRCRAFT CARRIERS - CVE
Bismarck Sea (CVE 95) Iwo Jima, B 02-21-45 03-30-45
Block Island (CVE 21) Atlantic, T 05-29-44 06-28-44
Gambier Bay (CVE 73) Leyte Gulf, G 10-25-44 11-27-44
Liscome Bay (CVE 56) Tarawa, T 11-24-43 12-06-43
Ommaney Bay (CVE 79) Lingayen, B 01-04-45 02-23-45
Saint Lo (CVE 63) Leyte Gulf, B 10-25-44 11-27-44
HEAVY CRUISERS - CA
Astoria (CA 34) Savo Island, G-T 08-09-42 11-02-42
Chicago (CA 29) Rennell Island, T 01-30-43 02-22-43
Houston (CA 30) Soenda Strait, G-T 02-28-42 05-08-42
Indianapolis (CA 35) Philippine Sea, T 07-30-45 09-01-45
Northampton (CA 26) Lunga Point, T 11-30-42 01-13-43
Quincy (CA 39) Savo Island, G-T 08-09-42 11-02-42
Vincennes (CA 44) Savo Island, G-T 08-09-42 11-02-42
LIGHT CRUISERS - CL
Atlanta (CL 51) Guadalcanal, G-T 11-13-42 01-13-43
Helena (CL 50) Kula Gulf, T 07-06-43 07-15-43
Juneau (CL 52) Guadalcanal, T 11-13-42 01-13-43
KEY
A Aircraft
B Bomb
C Collision
EA Enemy Action
EX Explosion; non enemy action
G Gunfire
GR Grounding
K Kamikaze
M Mine
SC Scuttled by US forces
T Torpedo
US Sunk or destroyed by US forces after enemy action
W Weather; typhoon/hurricane

www.fighterjocks.net (http://www.fighterjocks.net) home of 12 time Champions AFJ http://www.alloutwar.com/IL2FS/round9.cfm http://www.onpoi.net/ah/pics/users/120_1083458407_knightsmove-taylor.jpg

RedDeth
06-06-2004, 03:11 AM
japanese carrier losses....Japanese Carriers of World War II.
Ten Fleet Carriers at the time of Pearl Harbor
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





The First Year
Name Type Dec'41 Jan'42 Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sep Oct Nov'42
Akagi CV PH Rabaul Java Ceylon home Midway
Kaga CV PH Rabaul Java repair home Midway
Soryu CV PH,WI Molucca Darwin Java Ceylon home Midway
Hiryu CV PH,WI Molucca Darwin Java Ceylon home Midway
Shokaku CV PH Rabaul Ceylon CoralSea home E.Sol SanCr home
Zuikaku CV PH Rabaul Ceylon CoralSea home, Kiska Kiska E.Sol SanCr home
Hosho(8) CVL Midway
Ryujo CVL P.I. Java Java Java Bengal(16) DutchH(37) Kiska E.Sol
Zuiho CVL P.I. Java Midway Kiska SanCr Guadalcanal
Taiyo CVE P.I. Java Truk Truk
Shoho CVL 26Jan CoralSea
Junyo CV 5May DutchH Kiska SanCr Guadalcanal
Unyo CVE 31May
Hiyo CV 31July Truk Guadalcanal
Chuyo CVE 25Nov
Ryuho CVL 28Nov

Key: red=sunk , blue=damaged , green=commissioned .
From the time of the naval battles around Gudalcanal in November 1942 until the Marianas campaign in June 1944, there were no fleet to fleet engagements of consequence. During this period, Japan produced a new big carrier, Taiho, and converted two seaplane tenders and a submarine tender to light carriers, three passenger liners to escort carriers, two battleships to handle aircraft, and neared completion of the world's largest aircraft carrier, Shinano . In the same period, the United States commissioned 10 Essex class large fleet carriers, 9 Independence class light carriers, and 50 Casablanca class escort carriers (Kaiser produced, though many of these served in the Atlantic).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Japanese Aircraft Carriers
Name Type(a/c) Tons Commis Sunk By Where Comments
Hosho CVL (11) 7,500 27Dec22 - - Kure Training
Akagi CV (63) 36,000 25May27 04June42 CV Midway
Kaga CV (72) 36,800 21Mar28 04June42 CV Midway
Ryujo CVL (46) 10,500 9May33 24Aug42 CV EastSolomons
Soryu CV (63) 17,500 29Sep37 04June42 CV Midway
Hiryu CV (63) 17,500 5July39 05June42 CV Midway
Zuiho CVL (24) 11,200 27Dec40 25Oct44 CV CapeEngano
Shokaku CV (72) 27,000 08Aug41 19June44 SS-244 Marianas
Taiyo CVE (27) 16,700 15Sep41 18Dec44 SS-269 off Luzon
Zuikaku CV (72) 27,000 25Sep41 25Oct44 CV CapeEngano
Shoho CVL (24) 11,200 26Jan42 07May42 CV Coral Sea
Junyo CV (45) 24,100 05May42 09Dec44 SS off Sasebo
Unyo CVE (27) 16,700 31May42 16Sep44 SS-220 S.ChinaSea
Hiyo CV (45) 24,100 31July42 20June44 CV (50) Marianas
Chuyo CVE (27) 16,700 25Nov42 04Dec43 SS-192 off Honshu
Ryuho CVL (31) 13,400 28Nov42 - - Kure
Ise BBV - C 1943 28July45 CV Kure
Hyuga BBV - C 1943 24July45 CV Kure
Chiyoda CVL (24) 11,200 31Oct43 25Oct44 CV CapeEngano
Kaiyo CVE 15,400 23Nov43 24July45 CV Beppu Bay
Shinyo CVE 17,500 15Dec43 17Nov44 SS-411 S.YellowSea
Chitose CVL (24) 11,200 01Jan44 25Oct44 CV CapeEngano
Taiho CV (62) 29,300 07Mar44 19June44 SS-218 Marianas
Unryu CVL 17,300 06Aug44 19Dec44 SS-395 EastChinaSea
Amagi CVL 17,100 10Aug44 28June45 air Kure
Shinano CVB (70) 62,000 19Nov44 29Nov44 SS-395 Inland Sea world largest
Katsuragi CV 17,300 15Oct44 Not service
Kasagi CVL 17,300 incomplete 85%
Ibuki CVL 14,500 incomplete 80%
Aso CV incomplete 60%
Ikoma CV incomplete 60%

Hosho was Japan's first carrier and used for experimentation and training, but took part in Midway.
Kaga was converted from a battleship hull when new battleships were forbidden by Naval Arms Treaty.
Akagi was converted from a battle cruiser hull when cruisers were limited by Naval Arms Treaty.
Ise and Hyuga were battleships with rear turrets removed and flight deck installed. When air crews became short, they fought again as battleships.
Chiyoda and Chitose were converted from seaplane carriers.
Zuiho and Shoho were converted from seaplane tenders.
Taiyo, Unyo and Chuyo were converted from passenger liners.
Shinano was a supercarrier, 71,000 tons, built on a superbattleship hull after the lessons of Midway proved the need for aircraft. She was torpedoed by Archerfish, 20Nov44, and sank in Tokyo Bay traveling between her launch site and training base.
Alternate spelling and names found. Shingo, Jinyo Junyo, Haytaka Unyo, Un'yo, Otaka
Hiyo, Haytaka Taiyo, Toiyo, Utaka



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fleet Seaplane Carriers, 1942
Name Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sep Oct Nov
Chitose P.I. P.I. Celebes Java MW(20) E.Solom GuadC
Kamikawa IndoC PMoresby MW(12) Agattu E.Solom
Natsugumo Agattu E.Solom
Kiyokawa Wake MakassarS Lea
Mizuho P.I. Molucca MakassarS Java Japan
Sanuki P.I. Balikpapan MakassarS P.I. Solomons Solomons
San'yo P.I. Borneo Solomons
Chiyoda MW(ms) Kiska
Nisshin MW(ms) NewBritain GuadC
Agutta = near Attu, Aleutians. ms = midget subs.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chronology of Japanese Carriers and Seaplane Carriers.
1941.
6Dec41. Yacht Isabel (PY-10) is sighted by floatplane from Japanese seaplane carrier Kamikawa Maru of Indo China. Later in the day, Isabel receives orders to return to Manila.

8 Dec41. Seaplane tender (destroyer) William B. Preston (AVD-7) is attacked by fighters and attack planes from Japanese carrier Ryujo in Davao Gulf, P.I.

14Dec41. Submarine Seawolf (SS-197) torpedoes Japanese seaplane carrier San'yo Maru off Aparri, P.I.; one torpedo hits the ship but does not explode.

16Dec41. Japanese Pearl Harbor Attack Force detaches carriers Hiryu and Soryu, heavy cruisers Tone and Chikuma, and two destroyers to reinforce second attack on Wake Island.
21Dec41. Planes from carriers Soryu and Hiryu bomb Wake Island.
22Dec41.Japanese bombers and attack planes, covered by fighters from carriers Soryu and Hiryu, bomb Wake Island .
23Dec41. Planes from carriers Hiryu and Soryu, as well as seaplane carrier Kiyokawa Maru provide close air support for the invasion of Wake Island.

1942.
27Jan42. USAAF B-17s bomb and damage Japanese seaplane carrier Sanuki Maru off Balikpapan, Borneo.

10Feb42. USAAF LB-30s bomb and damage Japanese seaplane carrier Chitose in Makassar Strait south of Celebes.
15Feb42. ABDA striking force (RAdm Doorman, RNN) is attacked by Japanese naval land attack planes as well as carrier attack planes from carrier Ryujo.

1 Mar42. Japanese heavy cruisers Myoko, Ashigara, Haguro and Nachi engage three Allied ships fleeing Java, sinking British heavy cruiser HMS Exeter and destroyer HMS Encounter. Destroyer Pope (DD-225), escapes the cruisers but is located and bombed by floatplanes from seaplane carriers Chitose and Mizuho. Pope is then located by carrier attack planes from Ryujo and bombed. Scuttling is in progress when Myoko and Ashigara deliver the coup de grace with gunfire.

10Mar42. Two US carriers attack Japanese invasion fleet off Lae and Salamaua, New Guineas sinking three and damaging ten ships including seaplane carrier Kiyokawa Maru.

6Apr42. Indian Ocean, Central Group, formed around carrier Ryujo attacks shipping.
Akagi, Soryu, Hiryu, Shokaku, Zuikaku attack British fleet at Ceylon.

9Apr42. PT-34 is bombed and strafed by floatplanes from Japanese seaplane carrier Sanuki Maru and destroyed off Cauit Island, P.I.

2May42. Submarine Drum (SS-228) torpedoes and sinks Japanese seaplane carrier Mizuho off south coast of Honshu.

7May42 . Battle of Coral Sea. Small carrier from the invasion support force, Shoho, sunk. "Scratch one flattop."
8May42 . Battle of the Coral Sea concludes as Japanese Carrier Strike Force formed around carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku is located and taken under air attack. SBDs from Lexington (CV-2)and Yorktown (CV-5) damage Shokaku and force her retirement. Zuikaku's air group suffers heavy losses. Damage to Shokaku, as well as to Zuikaku's air group, prevents the use of those two carriers for several months, thus making them unavailable for immediate operations (Midway).

27May42. Navy Day ceremony Inland Sea: Akagi, Kaga, Soryu, and Hiryu.

3Jun42. As part of the overall Midway plan, Japanese Second Strike Force bombs Dutch Harbor, Alaska; with planes from carriers Ryujo and Junyo.

4 June42. Concentrating on the destruction of Midway air forces and diverted by their torpedo, horizontal, and dive bombing attacks, the Japanese carriers are caught unprepared for the carrier air attack which began at 0930 with the heroic but unsuccessful effort of Torpedo Squadron 8, and were hit in full force at 1030 when dive bombers hit and sank the carriers Akagi, Kaga, and Soryu. In the late afternoon, U.S. carrier air hit the Mobile Force again, sinking Hiryu, the fourth and last of the Japanese carriers in action.

5June42. Planes from Japanese carriers Ryujo and Junyo reprise their attack on installations at Dutch Harbor, Alaska.

3July42. USAAF B-24s bomb and damage Japanese seaplane carriers Kamikawa Maru and Kimikawa Maru off Agattu Island.

24Aug42. Battle of the Eastern Solomons. With a force of 58 ships, including three carriers and eight battleships, the Japanese attempt to reinforce Guadalcanal. Planes from Saratoga sink the Japanese light carrier Ryujo, damage seaplane carrier Chitose, and destroy 90 enemy planes causing that force to withdraw.

1 Sept42. USAAF B-17s bomb and damage Japanese flying boat support ship Akitsushima

24Sep42. USAAF B-17 damages Japanese seaplane carrier Sanuki Maru off Shortlands Island, Solomons.
Submarine Trout (SS-202) torpedoes Japanese escort carrier Taiyo east of Truk.

28Sep42. Submarine Sculpin (SS-191) torpedoes Japanese seaplane carrier Nisshin east of Kokoda Island

11Oct42. Battle of Cape Esperance. Japanese transport force, formed around seaplane carriers Chitose and Nisshin and six destroyers, reaches Tassafaronga, Guadalcanal, to disembark elements of the Japanese Army's 2d Infantry Division.

15Oct42. Off San Cristobal, Solomons, planes from Japanese carriers Shokaku and Zuikaku sink the destroyer Meredith.

26Oct42. Battle of Santa Cruz Islands. The U.S. victory does not come cheaply in this fourth major carrier battle of 1942, for Enterprise (CV-6) is damaged by planes from carriers Junyo and Shokaku. Hornet (CV-8) is damaged by planes from Junyo, Shokaku, and Zuikaku. South Dakota (BB-57) and San Juan (CL-54) are damaged by planes from Junyo. SBDs from Enterprise damage carrier Zuiho. SBDs from Hornet damage carrier Shokaku.

1943.

Seaplane carriers Chitose and Chiyoda rebuilt as light aircraft carriers.

7 April43. Operation I-Go: last Japanese air offensive in the Solomons off Lunga Roads. Carrier bombers (VAL) strike U.S. and Allied shipping near Tulagi, Solomons, sinking destroyer Aaron Ward (DD-483) and New Zealand corvette HMNZS Moa and damaging oilers Kanawha (AO-1) and Tappahannock (AO-43) and tank landing ship LST-449.

29May43. Submarine Scamp (SS-277) sinks Japanese seaplane carrier Kamikawa Maru north of Kavieng, New Ireland,

10June43. Submarine Trigger (SS-237) damages Japanese carrier Hiyo 18 miles off Irozaki, Honshu.
23June43. Submarine Harder (SS-257) damages Japanese seaplane carrier Sagara Maru off southern Honshu.

4 July43. Submarine Pompano (SS-181) sinks Japanese seaplane carrier Sagara Maru, previously damaged by Harder (SS-257).
10July43. Submarine Steelhead (SS-280) damages Japanese escort carrier Un'yo., near Truk in the Carolines.
23July43. Three waves of Navy and USAAF planes, including B-17s and B-24s, attack Japanese resupply convoy off Cape Friendship; SBDs and TBFs sink seaplane carrier Nisshin.

6 Aug43. Submarine Pike (SS-173) unsuccessfully attacks Japanese aircraft carrier Taiyo east of Marianas.

Ise rebuilt as aircraft carrier.

24 September. Submarine Cabrilla (SS-288) disables Japanese carrier Taiyo northwest of Chichi Jima.

18Oct43. Submarine Flying Fish (SS-229) attacks Yokosuka-bound Japanese escort carrier Chuyo, in the Marianas. Although Flying Fish claims one hit, the enemy flattop bears a charmed life, having survived an attack by Mingo (SS-261) on 16 October 1943 as well, and continues on to her destination on schedule.

5Nov43. Submarine Halibut (SS-232) damages Japanese carrier Junyo in Bungo Channel of southern Japan; heavy cruiser Tone tows the damaged ship to Kure.
30Nov43. Submarine Skate (SS-305) attacks Japanese carrier Zuiho, in the Mariana Basin, which, along with carrier Un'yo and escort carrier Chuyo and escort vessels, is proceeding back to Japan from Truk. Although Skate claims one damaging hit, none of her four torpedoes strikes home.

4Dec43 . Submarine Sailfish (SS-192) torpedoes and sinks Yokosuka-bound Japanese escort carrier Chuyo southeast of Honshu. Unbeknown to Sailfish, Chuyo is carrying survivors from sister ship Sculpin (SS-191).
Japanese seaplane carrier Sanuki Maru is damaged by mine, off Pomelaa, as she sails for Singapore.
27Dec43. Submarine Tautog (SS-199) damages Japanese seaplane carrier Kimikawa Maru off Shionomisaki, Honshu.

1944.

19Jan44. Submarine Haddock (SS-231) damages Japanese carrier Un'yo 140 miles east-southeast of Guam.

17Feb44. TF 58 aircraft raid Truk and damage Japanese destroyers Shigure and Matsukaze, submarines I-10 and RO-37, target ship Hakachi, repair ship Akashi, ammunition ship Soya, seaplane tender Akitsushima, and auxiliary submarine chaser Cha 20.

14Mar44. Japanese seaplane carrier Sanuki Maru is damaged by mine off Thailand.
16Mar44. Submarine Lapon (SS-260) carries out unsuccessful attack on Japanese seaplane tender Kunikawa Maru, NW of Philippines.

19June44. Battle of the Philippine Sea. The Japanese lose at least 300 aircraft in what U.S. Navy pilots call the "Marianas Turkey Shoot." Submarine Albacore (SS-218) sinks Japanese new carrier Taiho, 180 nautical miles north-northwest of Yap. Submarine Cavalla (SS-244) sinks Japanese carrier Shokaku, 140 nautical miles north of Yap Island.
20June44. TBFs from Belleau Wood sink damaged carrier Hiyo northwest of Yap Island. TF 58 planes also damage carrier Zuikaku, small carriers Junyo, Chiyoda and Ryuho, fast fleet tanker/seaplane carrier Hayasui, battleship Haruna, heavy cruiser Maya and 5 lesser ships. VAdm Mitscher orders the ships of TF 58 to show lights in order to guide returning strike groups home.

26July44. Submarine Angler (SS-240) damages transport (ex-seaplane carrier) Kiyokawa Maru in convoy in South China Sea.

18Aug44. Submarine Rasher (SS-269) encounters Japanese convoy off west coast of Luzon. Rasher sinks escort carrier Taiyo, transport Teia Maru, cargo ship Eishin Maru, and oiler Teiyo Maru southwest of Cape Bojeador.
19Aug44. U.S. submarines continue attacks on Japanese convoy begun the previous day as Bluefish (SS-222) sinks fast fleet tanker/seaplane carrier Hayasui, 80 nautical miles northwest of Cape Bolinao.

17Sep44. Submarine Barb (SS-220) sinks Japanese escort carrier Un'yo and tanker Asuza Maru, 220 nautical miles southeast of Hong Kong.

08Oct44. Submarine Becuna (SS-319) damages Japanese seaplane carrier Kimikawa Maru in South China Sea.
23Oct44. Submarine Sawfish (SS-276) sinks Japanese seaplane carrier Kimikawa Maru west of Luzon.
25Oct44. Battles of Leyte Occupation. The Fast Carrier Force met the Northern Force in the Battle Off Cape Engano, sinking the heavy carrier Zuikaku and light carriers Chiyoda, Zuiho, and Chilose, the latter with the assistance of cruiser gunfire.

17Nov44. Submarine Spadefish (SS-411) sinks Japanese escort carrier Shinyo 140 miles northeast of Shanghai, China, in Yellow Sea.
29Nov44. Submarine Archerfish (SS-311) sinks Japanese supercarrier Shinano, 71,000 tons, built on a superbattleship hull. She was sunk in Tokyo Bay traveling between her launch site and training base.

09Dec44. Submarine Sea Devil (SS-400) and Redfish (SS-395) damage Japanese carrier Junyo a few hours apart.
19Dec44. Submarine Redfish (SS-395) sinks new Japanese light carrier Unryu 200 nautical miles SE of Shanghai, China.

1945.

28Jan45. Submarine Spadefish (SS-411) attacks Japanese convoy in the southern Yellow Sea and sinks transport (ex-seaplane carrier) Sanuki Maru.

06Feb45 . Japanese battleship/carrier Ise is damaged by mine, Singapore.

19Mar45. TF 58 (VAdm Mitscher) pounds airfields on Kyushu, and shipping at Kure and Kobe, Honshu, destroying incomplete Japanese submarine I-205 in drydock, and damaging battleships Yamato, Hyuga and Haruna; carriers Ikoma, Katsuragi, Ryuho and Amagi; small carrier Hosho; escort carrier Kaiyo; heavy cruiser Tone, light cruiser Oyodo, submarines I-400 and RO-67, auxiliary submarine chaser Cha 229 at Kure; and escort destroyer Kaki at Osaka.

9Apr45. Submarine Tirante (SS-420) damages Coast Defense Vessel No.102. Transport (ex-seaplane carrier) Kiyokawa Maru tows the damaged ship to safety.
29Apr45. Transport (ex-seaplane carrier) Kumikawa Maru is damaged by mine laid by RAAF Catalina off Balikpapan, Borneo.
30Apr45. USAAF B-24s sink Kunikawa Maru previously damaged by Australian mine.

24May45. B-29 laid mine damages transport (ex-seaplane carrier) Kiyokawa Maru

14July45. TF 38 planes damage Japanese carriers Amagi and Katsuragi, and battleship Haruna at Kure, Japan.
24July45. Aircraft from TF 38 launch two-day attack on the Inland Sea area, Japan, striking Kure Naval Base and airfields at Nagoya, Osaka, and Miho. TF 38 planes sink battleship-carrier Hyuga in Hiro Bay, Kure; heavy cruiser Tone (she is pushed aground to facilitate salvage) off Eta Jima; target ship (ex-battleship) Settsu at Kure; and damage carrier Ryuho and battleship-carrier Ise at Kure; battleship Haruna and light cruiser Oyodo off Eta Jima; heavy cruiser Aoba at Kure Navy Yard; transport (ex-seaplane carrier) Kiyokawa Maru, and 12 lesser ships. Carrier Amagi is hit by a rocket off Kurahashi Jima, Kure.
24July45. Japanese escort carrier Kaiyo is damaged by planes from British carriers HMS Formidable, HMS Indefatigable, and HMS Victorious. Kaiyo's travails, however, do not end there. She is damaged by mine laid by a B-29 off Beppu.
28July45. Aircraft from TF 38 of the Third Fleet (Adm Halsey) strike Inland Sea area, between Nagoya, and Northern Kyushu; principally targeting the Kure Naval Base. TF 38 planes sink battleship Haruna, battleship-carrier Ise, heavy cruiser Aoba,, light cruiser Oyodo, and 19 lesser ships.
28July45. TF 38 planes damage carrier Katsuragi and training carrier Hosho.
29July45. USAAF B-25s (5th Air Force) damage Japanese escort carrier Kaiyo in Hiji harbor.


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See Japanese Naval Aircraft
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About this page: Japanese Carriers - World War II. The grid is being filled in as the ships are found in various books. One that is interesting is "The End of the Imperial Japanese Navy" by Masanori Ito. It is from the Japanese perspective, in which, "Four enemy cruisers were sunk" means that American ships were lost.
Last updated on November 2, 2003
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RedDeth
06-06-2004, 03:14 AM
some of that list was color coded. here is a straight list of sunk carriers

Japanese Aircraft Carriers
Name Type(a/c) Tons Commis Sunk By Where Comments
Hosho CVL (11) 7,500 27Dec22 - - Kure Training
Akagi CV (63) 36,000 25May27 04June42 CV Midway
Kaga CV (72) 36,800 21Mar28 04June42 CV Midway
Ryujo CVL (46) 10,500 9May33 24Aug42 CV EastSolomons
Soryu CV (63) 17,500 29Sep37 04June42 CV Midway
Hiryu CV (63) 17,500 5July39 05June42 CV Midway
Zuiho CVL (24) 11,200 27Dec40 25Oct44 CV CapeEngano
Shokaku CV (72) 27,000 08Aug41 19June44 SS-244 Marianas
Taiyo CVE (27) 16,700 15Sep41 18Dec44 SS-269 off Luzon
Zuikaku CV (72) 27,000 25Sep41 25Oct44 CV CapeEngano
Shoho CVL (24) 11,200 26Jan42 07May42 CV Coral Sea
Junyo CV (45) 24,100 05May42 09Dec44 SS off Sasebo
Unyo CVE (27) 16,700 31May42 16Sep44 SS-220 S.ChinaSea
Hiyo CV (45) 24,100 31July42 20June44 CV (50) Marianas
Chuyo CVE (27) 16,700 25Nov42 04Dec43 SS-192 off Honshu
Ryuho CVL (31) 13,400 28Nov42 - - Kure
Ise BBV - C 1943 28July45 CV Kure
Hyuga BBV - C 1943 24July45 CV Kure
Chiyoda CVL (24) 11,200 31Oct43 25Oct44 CV CapeEngano
Kaiyo CVE 15,400 23Nov43 24July45 CV Beppu Bay
Shinyo CVE 17,500 15Dec43 17Nov44 SS-411 S.YellowSea
Chitose CVL (24) 11,200 01Jan44 25Oct44 CV CapeEngano
Taiho CV (62) 29,300 07Mar44 19June44 SS-218 Marianas
Unryu CVL 17,300 06Aug44 19Dec44 SS-395 EastChinaSea
Amagi CVL 17,100 10Aug44 28June45 air Kure
Shinano CVB (70) 62,000 19Nov44 29Nov44 SS-395 Inland Sea world largest
Katsuragi CV 17,300 15Oct44 Not service
Kasagi CVL 17,300 incomplete 85%
Ibuki CVL 14,500 incomplete 80%
Aso CV incomplete 60%
Ikoma CV incomplete 60%

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SKULLS Virga
06-06-2004, 09:23 AM
"USS Yorktown CV-5
September 30, 1937 - June 7, 1942

The warmest ship in the US Navy"

What does this statement refer to? I don't understand.

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SkyChimp
06-06-2004, 10:52 AM
The Yorktown had a reputation for having a very cohesive crew, and for providing a very friendly environment for its pilots. It was a very highly regarded ship.

Regards,
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Giganoni
06-06-2004, 01:26 PM
Although the US didn't actually "lose" an Essex class carrier, one was put out of commission for the rest of the war and had around a thousand casualties, the USS Franklin. All this was due to some lucky strikes with 250kg bombs from a couple of Judys. It was off of Kyushu. Also the CVL Princeton during Leyte was sunk by a single judy. So despite Japan being wholy outnumbered and out classed in the end they managed to still score some victories against our carrier forces.

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RedDeth
06-06-2004, 04:11 PM
with a hundred carriers off your coast your bound to get a little lucky and sink one. on the flipside the japanese lost all their carriers and even the ones that were still being built. after okinawa we sat off the japanese coast for a couple months with no ship casualties. in the meantime we were shelling tokyo with battleships daily. japan had nothing left to hit us with or fight back. even without the big bombs we didnt need to invade.

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Giganoni
06-06-2004, 09:17 PM
http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/88.gif I swear you must wear red white and blue everyday. The USS Franklin was part of task force 58 which had 16 carriers, not 100. It was actually the flagship of task group 2 within the task force. This was before Okinawa and it was an Essex class carrier, one of the newest carriers comissioned in 44. Lucky hits? Maybe, but certainly brave to face such odds.

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RedDeth
06-07-2004, 02:07 AM
if your referring to me. then yes we had about 100 aircraft carriers off japan at wars end. not 16

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Giganoni
06-07-2004, 03:25 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by RedDeth:
if your referring to me. then yes we had about 100 aircraft carriers off japan at wars end. not 16

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Oh I am not doubting that we had around 100 carriers even if most were smaller CVEs. However, if you paid any attention to the post the USS Franklin was put out of action before even the invasion of Okinawa. It was part of a Task Force of 16 carriers (all sizes) and was doing raids. There were not a hundred carriers in that task force. It was also a flagship and an Essex class carrier. I was simply bringing to light the bravery of those Japanese Judy bombers managing to fly through those fighters and flak to score victories for their country. I was giving them credit where credit is due.

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jensenpark
06-07-2004, 06:15 AM
Chimp, thanks as always for your research.

Reddeth, do you have more info on the 'supercarrier' you mentioned? I've not heard of it before...appreciate any links or other info you can provide.

As to the carriers, very sad. I was always a Hornet fan...always seemed to me the underdog carrier...maybe because of their poor Devestators at Midway...

http://www.corsair-web.com/thistler/rtfoxint.jpg
Buzz Beurling flying his last sortie over Malta, Oct.24, 1942

Doug_Thompson
06-07-2004, 08:48 AM
There was a kid who was 14 or 15 on the Yorktown when it went down. He survived, and the Navy brass just about had a heart attack when they almost had such a youngster killed at sea.

They hushed the whole thing up and gave him shore duty at Pearl.

========

I've always had a sentimental attachment to the Wasp, the little ship that could. I had the honor of interviewing one of her survivors for a newspaper article many years ago. He retired in Sherwood, Ark.

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the_w_man
06-07-2004, 12:41 PM
14-15 years old!?! Now that is bad (for him, and for the navy!). The whole thing sounds like the story from the times of "ships in line"! Ok, back then some crew were even yonger: 9-10 years!

RedDeth
06-07-2004, 02:43 PM
rgr that ill give a little info on the japanese super carrier here and more later.....

"Shinano CVB (70) 62,000 19Nov44 29Nov44 SS-395 Inland Sea world largest"


"Shinano was a supercarrier, 71,000 tons, built on a superbattleship hull after the lessons of Midway proved the need for aircraft. She was torpedoed by Archerfish, 20Nov44, and sank in Tokyo Bay traveling between her launch site and training base"

"Shinano (Aircraft Carrier, 1944).
Shinano, a 68059-ton aircraft carrier, was converted from a battleship while under construction at Yokosuka, Japan. She was the largest aircraft carrier built prior to the late 1950s. Hastily completed in November 1944, she was sunk on the 29th of that month by the U.S. Navy submarine Archerfish."



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RedDeth
06-07-2004, 02:51 PM
LARGEST AIRCRAFT CARRIER IN THE WORLD WAS JAPANESE TILL 1961 and the big E... http://www.strategyplanet.com/commandos/shinano.html


Official designation: IJN Shinano class aircraft carrier
Common designation: Shinano
Type: Aircraft carrier
Manufacturer: Yokosuka Navy Yard
Production Dates: May 4, 1940 - Keel laid (planned as third Yamato class battleship)
Dec 12, 1940 - Construction of the Shinano halted

1942 - Plans altered, Shinano now planned as an aircraft carrier

Oct 8, 1944 - Shinano is launched
Nov 19, 1944 - Shinano is commissioned


Boilers: 12 Kanpon boilers
Turbines: Geared steam turbines
Horsepower: 153,000 s.h.p.
Shafts: 4
Range (Nautical Miles): 7,200 @ 16 knots
Maximum Speed: 27-28 knots
Crew: 2,400
Standard Displacement (tons): 59,900 ( kg) Full Load Displacement (tons): 73,040 ( kg)
Length (O/A): 840ft (256 m) Length (W/L): 810ft (247 m)
Beam: 119ft (36.3 m) Draft: 32.9ft (10 m)
Flight Deck Length: 872.9ft (266 m) Flight Deck Width: 131.3ft (40 m)
Hanger: 550ft long

Protection: Main Side Belt: Possible 5in belt
Deck Armour 2.8in - 4.0in
Flight Deck Armour 3.1in
Citadel Various important parts of the ship were protected by light armour


Armament: Main Battery: 16 x 5" (127mm)/40 cal Type 89 in eight twin mountings
Secondary Battery 12 x 4.7" 45 cal (120mm) 10 Nendo Shiki in twin mounts
Anti-Aircraft Weapons 145 x 60 cal (25 mm) MG
22 x 76 cal (13 mm) MG
12 x 28 barrel AAW rocket launchers


History: The Japanese Empire had plans to build three huge battleships: Yamato, scheduled for completion on December 16, 1941; Musashi, scheduled for completion on August 5, 1942: and Shinano, which was converted to an aircraft carrier and initially scheduled for completion in January 1945. The conversion was primarily caused due to losses of Japanese Carrier Forces at the battles of Midway and the Coral Sea.
Features: The conversion plans of Shinano placed a heavy emphasis on armor. This armor included "large bulges, or 'blisters', below the waterline - like those on Yamato and Musashi". Additionally the flight decks and hanger decks all had additional armor to protect from aerial attack. "The weight of steel installed for defensive purposes totaled 17,700 tons - about one-quarter of Shinano's displacement and equal to the tonnage of many light cruisers." Many other modifications of machinery, tanks, armaments and armor brought "Shinano's full-load displacement to 71,980 tons" which "topped by some 200 tons the original full-load displacements of her onetime sister ships, Yamato and Musashi. Later, the battleships added 1,700 tons of armor. Shinano was therefore the largest aircraft carrier ever built, and she retained that distinction until the commissioning of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier U.S.S. Enterprise in 1961."




Service Record: By 1944, the Japanese people knew they were losing the war. The SHINANO was to be their 'secret weapon' --- a ship so big and powerful it would 'save Japan'. It was highly publicized in Japan as their key to turning the tide of the war. Commissioned on November 18, 1944, the Shinano was torpedoed by the submarine USS Archerfish just 10 days later while on her maiden voyage to a safe port for fitting out. She went down without ever launching a single plane. Because of her prodigious bunkerage and ordnance stowage space, it was intended that she operate as both a carrier and a replenishment vessel. The victim of faulty damage control and her watertight compartmentation not yet being installed (which begs the question, whose bright idea was it to leave harbor for another port for final fitting out, in 1944, with the Inland Sea crawling with allied subs, without all her watertight doors installed?). The Japanese high command had 'egg all over their faces', and for the remainder of the war, never did tell the Japanese people about the sinking, knowing that the loss would further demoralize the Japanese people. For an excellent account of the events leading to the the Shinano's sinking by the Archerfish, read the Archerfish vs Shinano.

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SkyChimp
06-07-2004, 05:49 PM
By WWII standard, Shinano was huge. But it wasn't as big or heavy as the Forrestal class super-carriers.

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RedDeth
06-07-2004, 08:47 PM
skychimp the info i pulled up on the forrestal shows it being 10,000 tons smaller than the shinano. "displacement: 59,900 tons
length: 1,046 feet
beam: 129 feet 4 inches; extreme width: 252 feet
draft: 28 feet
speed: 33 knots
complement: 4,000+ crew
armament: 8 5-inch guns
class: Forrestal"



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RedDeth
06-07-2004, 09:00 PM
upon further study it seems the forrestal class is even larger than stated here. it is definitely longer than the shinano . but i believe total loaded weight is about equal to the shinano.

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