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fordfan25
08-09-2004, 08:52 PM
and how and when did it get started?im american and was just woundering. iv heard it in movies and never realy paid it any thought until now. if its one of those sensitive things like the phrase "jap" then know that im not tring to start anything just would like to know. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

fordfan25
08-09-2004, 08:52 PM
and how and when did it get started?im american and was just woundering. iv heard it in movies and never realy paid it any thought until now. if its one of those sensitive things like the phrase "jap" then know that im not tring to start anything just would like to know. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Resident_Jock
08-09-2004, 08:58 PM
Mainly because of the famous American song "Yankee Doodle" and various other references to the word "Yankee".

http://thecasualty.homestead.com/files/resident_siggy.jpg

SkyChimp
08-09-2004, 09:00 PM
A quick Google reveals:

The term Yankee has a variety of meanings. Residents of the United States of America use it to refer to the New York Yankees baseball team, a resident of New England, or more often, in the context of the American Civil War, the soldiers and residents of the northern United States including the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and New England states, as well as other border-state and African-American troops. Regionally, today Yankee most often refers to a New Englander to denote New England puritan and thrifty values. The principal use of the term in the USA is a means of distinguishing Yankees from those from the South (i.e., the southeastern USA). See also yankee ingenuity

The etymology is uncertain; one suggestion is that it derives from Dutch Janke, diminutive of Jan (John), or Jan Kees, for "John Cheese", a nickname for English settlers bestowed by the Dutch in the early days of New York City. The phrase was probably popularized by the English in the song Yankee Doodle Dandee to describe New Yorkers, and perhaps, all (Northern) Americans in the colonies.

Others – that is, speakers from outside of the USA – often use it to refer to any resident of the USA (as opposed to American in general), especially in the form Yank. The words are sometimes spelt with a lowercase initial, yankee and yank, and may be used in a disapproving sense.

In sum, the phrase probably originated in old New Amsterdam, New Holland and New York, in the Mid-Atlantic. It then was adopted by the British to describe (Northern) colonists. In the Civil War, the phrase referred to all residents and soldiers of northern or free states, usually used derisively by rebel troops and secession sympathizers. The Yankees baseball team refocussed attention on New York, and the need to describe the rural, New Englander of puritan stock probably caused reporters and authors to bring back the slang shorthand term of Yankee. Finally, citizens of other countries, including the British during the World Wars, referred to all Americans as Yanks.

In other parts of the world, particularly Latin America, yankee or yanqui is meant as an insult and is politically associated with anti-imperialism and used in expressions such as "Yankee go home".

Hence, the term has had different positive, negative, contextual and regional associations over the years, as books, media, troops, teams, and peoples have used it differently for different purposes.

To foreigners, a Yankee is an American.
To Americans, a Yankee is an Easterner.
To Easterners, a Yankee is a New Englander.
To New Englanders, a Yankee is a Vermonter.
And in Vermont, a Yankee is somebody who eats pie for breakfast.
â"”(an old definition)

Regards,
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Proberton
08-09-2004, 09:09 PM
In Australia the term "Yank" has been transformed further using rhyming slang. Some Australians will refer to an american as a Septic Tank or Sepo for short. Septic Tank rhyms with Yank. This terminology was more popular during WWII.

VF-3Thunderboy
08-09-2004, 09:37 PM
I think it was mainly used by allies in WW2. I dont think the Germans used "Yank", maybe Japanese with bad English. "You die Yankee!"???

http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

I know lots of WW2 guys who still say "Japs". One former flying tiger still doesnt trust em, but would probably be "banned" for some of the things he has said online.-LoL

Snootles
08-09-2004, 09:56 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> In Australia the term "Yank" has been transformed further using rhyming slang. Some Australians will refer to an american as a Septic Tank or Sepo for short. Septic Tank rhyms with Yank. This terminology was more popular during WWII. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

That shows up a lot in Cockney slang- rhyming terms. For instance, calling someone a "holy friar" is calling them a liar. Or "trouble and strife" for wife.

fordfan25
08-09-2004, 10:02 PM
thanks guys. and thanks chimp you went to some trouble that was cool of ya, i take back every thing iv said behind your ba........um never mind http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif j/k. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Proberton
08-09-2004, 10:35 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>That shows up a lot in Cockney slang- rhyming terms. For instance, calling someone a "holy friar" is calling them a liar. Or "trouble and strife" for wife.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Other terms I've heard
Joe Blake - Snake
Noa's Ark (Noa for short) - Shark

Latico
08-09-2004, 11:24 PM
As an American, I don't take any offense to being called a Yank or Yankee by foriegners.

The "go home" part is a bit irritating though. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/59.gif

Dimensionaut_
08-10-2004, 01:55 AM
"one suggestion is that it derives from Dutch Janke"

That would be old Dutch then, though I didn't hear it often. I only know it from the Flemish (Belgian) Dutch actually. Jantje is more common in the Netherlands.

I do know another word that sounds much like it: 'janken' which means as much as crying or whining.

[speculating mode on]
I don't know how old that word is, but knowing that the English and Dutch were at war a few times in those days (the English also have some old sayings referring to the Dutch to point out bad things), Yanky could come from that word as well, or 'janken' also comes from 'Janke'.
[speculating mode off]

<A HREF="http://www.1java.org/sh" TARGET=_blank>
http://www.uploadit.org/1javaserval/images.php
</A>

Tooz_69GIAP
08-10-2004, 02:21 AM
Well, if you consider that New York was first called New Amsterdam, then it's more likely that it is from old dutch rather than today's standard dutch.

Is interesting to find these things out.

whit ye looking at, ya big jessie?!?!

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LEXX_Luthor
08-10-2004, 02:30 AM
Yankee Go Home....probably started after USA Civil WAR.

I don't think the Germans made up the song The Yanks Are Coming. Was that World War 1?

Tooz_69GIAP
08-10-2004, 02:53 AM
I've got that song, it's called "Over There". It's sung by Billy Murray and marked as a 1917 recording.

The lyric of the first part of the chorus is:

"Over there, over there,
Send the word, send the word over there
That the yanks are coming,
The yanks are coming,
With drum drum drumming everywhere" (something like that anyway)

whit ye looking at, ya big jessie?!?!

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Toranaga75
08-10-2004, 03:18 AM
I still know the music to this song... *is scared of himself now*

gwanna
08-10-2004, 03:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Proberton:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>That shows up a lot in Cockney slang- rhyming terms. For instance, calling someone a "holy friar" is calling them a liar. Or "trouble and strife" for wife.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Other terms I've heard
Joe Blake - Snake
Noa's Ark (Noa for short) - Shark<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah, You will have to run for the dog and bone if one of your billy lids gets bitten by a joe blake. Of course If a noah grabs ya, then your'e as handy as a dead dogs donga.

Cheers

Vengeanze
08-10-2004, 03:58 AM
Ok, so now we know what Yanks mean (John Cheese http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_redface.gif).

Now how come
America = US
...and...
Americans = Yanks
when the continent called America includes so many more??

Why is it I get beaten up when calling a Canadian an American?? http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif


Anyone know of the historical reason for this?

/Ven
http://www.la-famiglia.se/skulls/web/pics/skulls_sig-Ven.gif

"Maybe for someone more easy to write something than to make something?"
- Oleg Maddox

michapma
08-10-2004, 04:12 AM
Ven, it's because the Canadians are bitter that Amerigo Vespucci didn't like Canada. They are also upset about the price of their fuel.

But I'm jest Yankin' yer chain...

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Flydutch
08-10-2004, 06:03 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by SkyChimp:
A quick Google reveals:

"that it derives from Dutch Janke, diminutive of Jan (John), or Jan Kees, for "John Cheese", a nickname for English settlers bestowed by the Dutch in the early days of New York City"

Interesting Skychimp!
My Name is; Kees Jan, wich is not a uncommon but quiet rare name combination of two names, in Holland. But 'Jan Kees' and 'Jan' or 'Kees'used to be a very common name for the farmers in the old days and the separate names are still around alot!

I have heard because of al the Dutch setllers in the Dutch colony 'Nieuw Amsterdam' (New Amsterdam, Now known as New York)It was the Natives like the Iroquois tribes who lived there nicknamed them 'Yankee' because allot of them would be named Jan or Kees,

Don't forget that the colonist took over a lot of native Names and words!

Kees Jan Hoeksema
from Amsterdam

Zyzbot
08-10-2004, 06:25 AM
And don't forget Damn Yankees



A Damn Yankee is the Yankee who came South and stayed as opposed to the good Yankee who came South to visit and left.

MrOblongo
08-10-2004, 06:50 AM
AMERICA IS A CONTINENT AND HAVE MANY MORE OTHER COUNTRIES THAN JUST USA.

Thats mainly why we call them yankees (or gringos) because we are americans too (im Chilean) and we will not call that country as the continent. Thats all http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
If u have a better way to say it, go ahead.

LEXX_Luthor
08-10-2004, 11:22 AM
Yes, USA extends from Canada to Chile. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/icon_twisted.gif A big place. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

~joke~

I prefer the word USAans for...USAans. This is the basic problem of calling your country a "beauracratic" name, alphabet soup, instead of a real name like Ireland or something.

USSRans were called Soviets. UKans, well I think we call them English.

[This message was edited by LEXX_Luthor on Tue August 10 2004 at 10:31 AM.]

MrOblongo
08-10-2004, 12:20 PM
YEah, hah, but the "name" is like that because it was the first independent country (so no other real countries in America when it founded), just Huge Colonies of other countries.

But the name: United States of America make sense for any country with states and in America :S (Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Canada, and USA). Anyway.

I like Gringos

Tooz_69GIAP
08-10-2004, 12:54 PM
Well, just to clarify, there are 2 american continents: South America and North America.

In the North American continent there is Canada, USA, Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.

In the South American continent there is Panama (half of it is in South America), Columbia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Guyana, Suriname, French Guyana, Peru, Brazil, Bolivia, Argentina, Chile, Uraguay and Paraguay.

And then of course, there are all the island nations on top of that (although I'm not sure which continent they would come under).

So, what is the best way to describe folks over in that big thing across the water?? Personally I tend to say americans when I mean people from the USA. And I will continue to do so until everyone stops asking where in England you find Scotland!!! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/smileys-gun2.gif

whit ye looking at, ya big jessie?!?!

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LEXX_Luthor
08-10-2004, 01:53 PM
Easter Island is so far away from anything, 2000km, its part of...Easter Island.

Baco-ECV56
08-10-2004, 02:09 PM
Well It is True, The USA, was the first country to achive its independance. Hence at the time an American was ovioslly from teh USA. Besiden native americans (in both north and south america) were called all kind of names but nice ones http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

So the name just stiked beocuse to call someone a United States of american sound really weird and too dam long http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif, so the shrotened way was to call them americans. besides teh Birtish I belive gevathem taht name, being the onlly americans that concerned them. The rest were just Spanish subdits, http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


By teh time that the rest of America achived its independance it was well nown arround the world that an Américan was a citicen from the USA. And since about 100 year went by sicenthe american s began being called that, I guees tehre was no point in chaging it.

So "American" is a historical term that stiked.

We (in argentina) call Americans "Norteamericanos" (northamericans), witch is not entirelly right since mexicans and canadians would also be nortamericans.
more recentlly we call them "estadounidenses". Since USA in spanish is "Estados Unidos de América". "estadounidense" is a very precise term with no bad connotation like Yankee.

Of course now that Mexico is Estados Unidos Mexicanos, we are in trouble aggain http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

So you see the matter is quite complex, so Socialist/comunist Activists need a simple term to incite the mases, so they picked "Yanqui". Since a "Gringo" can be applyed to a white european also.



And now people, actually there are four SUB-continents. There is onlly ONE american continent, but the four Sub-continents are:

North America:

Cánada, USA and The United States of México (witch is the oficial Mexican name: Estados Unidos Mexicanos.)

Central América: Panama, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Belice.

Caribean:
Jamaica, Haiti, Republica Dominicana, Cuba, Bahamas, Grenada, Antigua & Barbuda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago. Barbados and Dominica. (and yes there are all sovereign states, not colonies or "over seas territories" like Virgin Islands, Saint Marten, Guadaloupe etc...)
Guyana and Suriname, are located in South America (geographiclly), but consider themselves Caribean Nations due to social and cultural proximity.


South America:
Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Brasil, Bolivia, Peru, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile and Argentina.

ZG77_Nagual
08-10-2004, 02:10 PM
I believe the term 'Yankee' is a version of the term 'w@nker' (as in 'Yanking off')- hence derogatory - the song 'Yankee Doodle Dandy' referring to an effete chronic masturbator.

Not sure who invented it - probably the brits http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Obviously the meaning was lost awhile back.

Baco-ECV56
08-10-2004, 02:11 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LEXX_Luthor:
Yes, USA extends from Canada to Chile. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/icon_twisted.gif A big place. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

~joke~
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

All right!!! Argentina hasnâ´t been ocupied yet (at least some part of it) http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gifhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Our territory extends a bit below Chile.

_VR_ScorpionWorm
08-10-2004, 02:15 PM
Tooz_69GIAP

Well, technically speaking there are '3' Americas: North America, Central America and South America.http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

http://img55.photobucket.com/albums/v169/Scorpion08/Hurri-1.jpg

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Vengeanze
08-10-2004, 03:18 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tooz_69GIAP:
In the North American continent there is Canada, USA, Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.

In the South American continent there is Panama (half of it is in South America), Columbia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Guyana, Suriname, French Guyana, Peru, Brazil, Bolivia, Argentina, Chile, Uraguay and Paraguay.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

U looked that up, didn't u. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by _VR_ScorpionWorm
Well, technically speaking there are '3' Americas: North America, Central America and South America<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ahhh, so sweet. He got the scotsman. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


And regarding the americans, well I'm so confused now so I think I'll stick to my std expression for americans - DUDE!! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

/Ven
http://www.la-famiglia.se/skulls/web/pics/skulls_sig-Ven.gif

"Maybe for someone more easy to write something than to make something?"
- Oleg Maddox

MrOblongo
08-10-2004, 05:33 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LEXX_Luthor:
Easter Island is so far away from anything, 2000km, its part of...Easter Island.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Eastern Island is part of Chile :P

Flydutch
08-10-2004, 05:42 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by MrOblongo:
AMERICA IS A CONTINENT AND HAVE MANY MORE OTHER COUNTRIES THAN JUST USA.

Ola senhor Oblongo!

tu es Razon!

The quistion should be : Why are the Northen Americans of the United States refered to as Yankees!?

My quistion would be: Why are the People from Holland (The Netherlands)called "Dutch" in the english language!?

I beliefe this also derivates from the Collonist of North America or the "New World"
Maybe because Many of those colonist came from Holland or escaped through Holland, It used to be a save Haven for many people with diffrent believes then the Catholic faith, and had to flee to Protestant Holland that was crowded with refuges from all over Europe and Eastern Europe But holland was and is smal so many passed through to the prommising New World
and many founded religious community's there.
for this type of Immegrant there came the term Dutch, probaly because in fact most of them would speak the German language and call them selfs 'Deutsch' (= people of Deutschland, Ofcourse the number of german refugees was much bigger) but how in the end the name became common and official name for us the Dutch people is still a mystery to me!

Latico
08-10-2004, 05:58 PM
In the late 1800's the Term "Dude" was used to refer to city slickers from "back east" by those that lived on the Western PLain of the USA. That's how we got "Dude Ranches". Westermners figured out that they could charge the Dudes for putting them on a horse and letting them pretend they was cowboys for a few days. It was quite entertaining to the westerners as well, watching them city slickers make asses of themselves. LOL Ever see the movie "City Slickers"? It was totally hilarious to someone like myself that has experience in working with cattle and doing it on horseback.

609IAP_Recon
08-10-2004, 06:37 PM
'cause if you mess with us we'll yank your chain http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

S!
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fordfan25
08-10-2004, 07:02 PM
what have i done http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/blink.gif lol http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Proberton
08-10-2004, 08:46 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by gwanna:

Yeah, You will have to run for the dog and bone if one of your billy lids gets bitten by a joe blake. Of course If a noah grabs ya, then your'e as handy as a dead dogs donga.

Cheers<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/88.gif

WTE_Dukayn
08-10-2004, 10:33 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by _VR_ScorpionWorm:
Tooz_69GIAP

Well, technically speaking there are '3' Americas: North America, Central America and South America.http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

http://img55.photobucket.com/albums/v169/Scorpion08/Hurri-1.jpg

http://www.vultures-row.com<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually if you check an atlas or some such, Central America is part of the North American continent. While the countries in that area are often referred to as Central America, they are not officially or technically part of their own continent. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

BfHeFwMe
08-10-2004, 10:43 PM
There's another story of its historical origin, supposidly out of China. All westerners were originally refered to as yankees, a corruption of the sound in Chinese for 'foreign devils'.

LEXX_Luthor
08-10-2004, 11:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by MrOblongo:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by LEXX_Luthor:
Easter Island is so far away from anything, 2000km, its part of...Easter Island.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Eastern Island is part of Chile :P<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
Politically yes! Much like Hawaiin Islands are Politically part of USA, but are not part of American continent. Easter Island is not part of American continent, but is all alone in the Pacific--its own self. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif At least that's how I see it, although that may not be the Official view.

VF-10_Snacky
08-11-2004, 03:28 AM
I'm glad I'm a Yank

http://www.x-plane.org/users/531seawolf/f4ucorsr.jpg

triggerhappyfin
08-11-2004, 08:06 AM
Anybody seen the film "last of the mohicans"??

The Indian name for the English sounded somewhat alike yankee.

Perhaps origin of the word is to be search for among native langueges of the north American continent??

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Heads-on firing was not a safe practice after all ?
Jussi Huotari: It was not specially recommendedâ.....
And later, as the Russians were armed with 20mm cannons, it was unwise to meet them heads-on

huggy87
08-11-2004, 01:03 PM
And while we are at it... those Turks really piss me off.

Why would they go and name their country after a goofy (but tasty) bird native to North America. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/crazy.gif That is our bird. Why don't they go name their country something like dodo, or ostrich, or emu.

BBB_Lionman
08-12-2004, 11:56 AM
Dunno if it's of interest to you guys - but Cockney Rhyming Slang in the UK was a secret code developed by the crimminal classes in the 18th century in London in the days of the first police, so that they could have rapid exchanges within earshot of the "Peelers" (early nickname for the London Police force as it was the UK Prime Minister Peel who inaugerated the service)

I am a 50/50 Scottish/English Brit married to a 100% American lady!

horseback
08-12-2004, 01:14 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BfHeFwMe:
There's another story of its historical origin, supposidly out of China. All westerners were originally refered to as yankees, a corruption of the sound in Chinese for 'foreign devils'.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Where did you get "Yankee" from "quai lo"? (my ex is Chinese, and often used the term with/at me).

cheers

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944

II_JG1Klaiber
08-12-2004, 02:46 PM
You guys got me curious, so I looked up Yankee in the Oxford English Dictonary. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I know I cheated, but the suspence was killing me. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Okay, so according to them the source of the word Yankee is unascertained. But, there are three theories as to it's etymology.

Theory 1 and 2 were alluded to by triggerhappyfin.

According to Theory 1, The word Yankee derives from the Cherokee word eankee, which means slave or coward. Supposedly, the term was applied to the inhabitants of New England by the Virginians for not assisting them in a war with the Cherokees.

Theory 2 says that Yankee is derives from a North American Indian corruption of the word "English". This is the most likely theory if you believe in the Native American connection: English &gt; Yengees &gt; Yankees.

The last theory was already mentioned by Skychimp. It is considered the most plausible out of all of the theories, but is still conjecture.

It states that Yankee derives from the Dutch word Janke (which is derived from "Jan" or John). And in this sense, it was applied as a derisive nickname by either the Dutch or the English in the New England States.

Evidence to support this last theory can be found in the surnames and/or nicknames of Dutch colonists of the era- Yanky, or Yankey or Yankee.

~Salut!~

Alfred Klaiber
Obstlt.u.Gruppenkommandeur
II.Gruppe Jagdgeschwader 1

horseback
08-12-2004, 03:37 PM
The proliferation of the term "Yankee" may have its roots in the fact that the bulk of US trade in the 19th century was conducted by "Yankee traders", US merchants and traders primarily from the New England area of the US (with some help from New York), most of whom were proud to call themselves Yankees.

Since most of the Americans seen by the rest of the world called themselves Yankees, it followed that they would come to call all persons from the USA Yankees (much to the enduring dismay of of our Southern citizens).

As for resentment, it is what you have to expect when your country has more power and influence than other countries. We received the mantle from Great Britain in WWII, and have worn it proudly-sometimes too proudly-since.

cheers

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944

BSS_Vidar
08-12-2004, 05:20 PM
I use to wonder about this when I was a kid. Why are we (U.S. citizens) called Americans? Well, because "United Statsians" sounds stupid! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/35.gif


The term Yankee goes all the way back to the 1700's. Yankee was slang for colonists of the "New World" and it stuck to us. Canada sprung from these colonist as they moved north. One battle lost near a Great Lake trading post probably kept the borders of the US going any farther North.