PDA

View Full Version : AC game set in the 1860's...... in Brazil



Rakdarr
01-27-2013, 04:15 PM
Yes, you heard that right. A 1860's Assassin's Creed Game, but not about all the ACW nonsense. Instead the new protagonist would be Brazilian or be an immigrant to Brazil, or rather the Empire of Brazil, which was a completely different country than the Republic of Brazil you have known. Do note that I did not say "the next AC game", but a future one. At that time, Brazil was on an equal footing with the United States, maybe not in industry, but certainly in economics, foreign prestige and military power. Before you say that you couldn't care less about Brazil's history, I recommend you to do a bit of research. It is truly fascinating and a game with such a setting would make much food for thought for the average AC player. South American history is often neglected past the wars of independence and a game set there would not only be fantastic, but would also help you to understand its culture and customs, which do play a large role in the world. Brazil's history is particularly interesting because it is a complete exception to the time's standard. While 19th century South America behaved like nowadays Africa, Brazil was a politically stable country with a true representative system and was the second biggest democracy in the world, only losing to the USA. While other countries had to deal with almost yearly coups and civil wars, Brazil experienced an uninterrupted period of internal peace from 1848 to 1889, when the monarchy was abolished and the republic utterly destroyed the country. So much is happening in Imperial Brazil and there are endless possibilities and characters that it would make a wonderful and enjoyable setting.

Why is that? The answer is rather simple. The Emperor. Dom Pedro II ruled Brazil from 1840 to 1889, prematurely ascending to the throne at age 14 after the troubled times of his nine year long regency, when the Empire suffered from several civil wars and violent infighting between the Conservative and Liberal Parties. He took control over a fragile and shattered nation and led it to become a great power in only 49 years, while ruling as the most liberal head of state of his time (yes, even more than Lincoln). I request you to read his Wikipedia article (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pedro_II_of_Brazil) at once or leave the thread immediately as to not waste your time. I am aware that this will rob me of a half of potential readers, but if he does not draw your attention, nothing here will.

Now that Dom Pedro II has been established as a potential Assassin or, at the very least, an Assassin ally, you must be asking yourself a valid question. Why should I care? Or perhaps a more specific "why the 1860's"? Hopefully the first question will have been answered by the time you finish reading this proposal, as I cannot give you a satisfactory one without analyzing the full picture. However, the latter one I will try and adress to now.

There were two man parties in Brazil. The Conservatives and the Liberals. The former were reactionary elites, who also supported state centralization, though. The latter were gennerally more liberal people, who supported the decentralization of power and local autonomy. Alas, a sword cuts in both ways. If he allied with the Conservatives, Dom Pedro II would be betraying his own nature, but he also needed the Conservatives in order to consolidate his power and avoid another Regency-ish crisis. Therefore, the first ten years of his reign were marked by the Conservatives' hegemony in the political scenario and the constant, yet slow, process of centralization in Rio de Janeiro, which eventually inaugurated a solid parliamentary system, in 1847.

Now that the country was finally in internal peace, the Emperor wanted to bring back the Liberals to power in the early 1850's. He called forward the Marquis of Paraná, a Conservative politician, to form a government with the Liberals. Paraná inaugurated the Conciliation Cabinet, which was composed of members of both parties. It brought back the decadent Liberals, but also maintained the Conservative in power, at least until Paraná's death, in 1858. His cabinet would fall in 1862, a victim of the internal divisions in the Conservative Party, which had been taken over by the reactionary ultraconservative elites. The moderate Conservatives created a third party, the Progressives, a mix of centralization and liberalism, and were swiftly appointed as the new prime ministers. Thus, the Conservative grip on power was shattered and the 1860's were a time when Assassin ideals flourished in Brazil and the first abolitionist laws were being drawn. Dom Pedro II enjoyed huge popularity and international respect, the country was industrializing and the parliament ruled unopposed.

Then a wild Paraguayan War appears, which would be the main setting of the game.

Paraguay, at the time, was headed by a hereditary dictator, President Solano Lopez. Most of you have never heard of him, but Brazilians have. Let me make this situation clear. Solano Lopez was, unlike we are taught about in school, a bloody dictator. Paraguay wasn't an industrialized and fully autonomous liberal heaven, but a dirt poor and underdeveloped place. Lopez was loathed by his people and he still was until the 20th century, when Latin American revolutionaries redesigned him as a native hero who stood up against Western imperialism and challenged the British with an autonomous and industrialized economy. This new image suited them to fight against the American influenced military dictatorships, installed to fight back communism in Latin America.

In reality, Lopez was a megalomaniac ruler, married to an Irish prostitute, who had dreams of greatness and "Grande Paraguay". He went into a war which he could not win, even if it had been only against Brazil. However, he wasn't an idiot, since he did manage to coup his brother out of the presidency. This raises another question. He seemed to be a reasonable and rather intelligent man, so why would he fight Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay, commanding Paraguay, of all countries?

Easy, he thought he would win the war, not through valiant arms and tactics, but through a PoE. Lopez, although not a Templar himself, was given a PoE by the Templars, who did not know how to make it work, and neither did Lopez. The Paraguayan War was just a part of a Templar plot to undermine Assassin influence in South America, specifically to weaken the Brazilian Monarchy and thus the Assassin Order. Lopez was just an unfortunate puppet which they used (don't worry, he wouldn't be another Cesare) to achieve their goals, which they did. While the Assassins were distracted with hunting down Lopez for the PoE (which would explain why Dom Pedro II did not allow the war to end until Lopez was dead, even though Paraguay was entirely occupied by Allied forces already in 1868), the Templars in Brazil strengthened themselves and eventually published the Republican Manifesto in 1870, strangely enough the same year as Lopez's death in the Battle of Cerro Corá (assassinated by our protagonist. If we were to strictly follow history, that would be Francisco José Lacerda, better known as "Chico the Devil", a Brazilian cavalryman who killed Lopez in single combat, even though he had been ordered to only disarm him. Or perhaps Lopez was even murdered by a Templar, who recovers the PoE for his order).

Lopez would seem to be the main antagonist for half of the game, but when the Assassin returns to Brazil he sees the Templars stronger than ever. As Brazilians and Brazilian history enthusiasts know, the Paraguayan War started the chain of events which would bring down the monarchy nineteen years later. It brought the Army to new levels of importance (always a bad thing in Latin America), which would cause severa, problems with insubordinance and indiscipline in the coming years, among other consequences.

However, here comes the kicker. Guess which was the main ideology opposed to the monarchy, which was sponsored by the Republicans (i.e. the Templars) and gained many followers among the officers corps? Positivism. I don't know about elsewhere but positivism can be summed up in this motto: Love as principle, order as basis, progress as goal. The only way to make this even more Templar is to add the Father of Understanding. The army officers who deposed the monarchy wanted to install a military dictatorship headed by a Soldier-Citizen, who would guarantee the Progress through Order. Hence, the Brazilian national (post-empire) flag's motto, Ordem e Progresso (Order and Progress). The men who were behind the Empire's fall would rule the country until 1930, with brief Assassin attempts to get back with Presidents Afonso Pena and Rodrigues Alves (who, by the way, died before being inaugurated for his second term).

Isn't this just a perfect scenario for an Assassin's Creed game? You spend half of the game tracking down the wrong person, who really fits in the role of villain, only to discover that the biggest international military conflict of the Americas was merely a distraction set up by the Templar Order to divert the Assassins frim the main enemy. Te game would span (in terms of gameplay) from 1864 (start of the Paraguayan War) to 1892 (death of Deodoro da Fonseca, the first president, possibly assassinated by the protagonist as to avenge the Emperor, but who died a monarchist and ashamed of everything he had done, for he was used by the Templars as a tool to bring down the monarchy). This would be the first game where you actually fail and bring down the Assassins through actions which had seemed great and sensible, but which were outwitted by the Templars. Later on, there could be a DLC where the Empire is successfully restored by the Federalist Revolution in Ro Grande do Sul, which failed in our time line.

What do you think?

Comments, suggestions and grammar nazis are appreciated. ;)

PS: Yes, I am Brazilian and this certainly helped me develop this scenario. I recognize I may be biased, but please try to judge this as a true proposal, not not a nationalist speech.

Rakdarr
01-27-2013, 06:10 PM
More than 100 views and still no reply? :(

lothario-da-be
01-27-2013, 06:54 PM
Its sooo long, and i don't have much time sorry

Rugterwyper32
01-27-2013, 06:57 PM
I'd say that it's a good potential idea. I had also thought of the Empire of Brazil as setting of an AC game before, but I had thought of the early days of the empire of Brazil, starting from the Royal Family of Portugal setting themselves up in Rio de Janeiro to Pedro II being declared fit to rule the empire after the age requirement was lowered. Either could work, if you want my take on it.
As for your idea, which cities would be the main locations in-game? I know there's a lot of wilderness that works perfectly, but I'm curious about cities. I just don't think I know enough about Brazil to know which locations are close to Paraguay that make sense for the game

Snakbarr
01-27-2013, 07:15 PM
You show a great depth of knowledge for your country which is brilliant. I'm really looking forwards to your Olympic games in the future and hope it will be a big old party. I might even see if I can get over and join in. I'd love to see another beaut of a velodrome so my country can win some more golds (I'm British). Anyway, back to the topic.

The backdrop you have described sounds like a great idea but I struggle to see the motive for actually being there. In previous games we have been travelling through history to obtain information so we can find PoEs, artefacts and locations to aid in our fight against the Templer cause. But now the fight has taken a new direction. Now the threat comes from Juno, and maybe I'm wrong here, but we don't know what is required to defeat her. So, returning to my question, why go to Brazil?

Rakdarr
01-27-2013, 07:38 PM
I'd say that it's a good potential idea. I had also thought of the Empire of Brazil as setting of an AC game before, but I had thought of the early days of the empire of Brazil, starting from the Royal Family of Portugal setting themselves up in Rio de Janeiro to Pedro II being declared fit to rule the empire after the age requirement was lowered. Either could work, if you want my take on it.
As for your idea, which cities would be the main locations in-game? I know there's a lot of wilderness that works perfectly, but I'm curious about cities. I just don't think I know enough about Brazil to know which locations are close to Paraguay that make sense for the gameI'd still need to flesh out the main story after Paraguay, but I'd say these ones:

Major locations

Rio de Janeiro: As the capital of Brazil, much of the action and political intrigue will happen here. Rio is also the biggest city of Brazil with the most impressive buildings (although not that impressive, but it'd still be better than AC3 cities in terms of free roam), not to mention the natural beauty and the mountains just off the coast. The protagonist would start his adventure here, but much of the time spent in Rio would be after the war.

Petrópolis: It would work akin to Monteriggioni in AC2, i.e. the main Assassin stronghold up in the mountains, where the Emperor's summer residence is located.

São Paulo: Although it is not a major city/population center in the 1870's, I'd choose it as a main location, designed as San Gimignano or Forli, but just with a bigger countryside in order to represent the coffee farms. São Paulo & whereabouts would be the Templars' power base, just like in history. The countryside should also include the town of Itu, where the Templar Republican Party was founded.

Salvador: As the second biggest city of Brazil, Salvador is the home of powerful politicians and oligarchic families. It does have an impressive architecture and an active port. The city is hosts also the greatest black community in relative numbers and could thus work as a recruitment center for the Assassins, who bring in former slaves into the order to aid the abolition.

Permanent secondary locations (such as Cappadocia):

Uruguaiana: The only Brazilian city to be captured by the Paraguayans in the early war and was also a meeting place for the Allies. Dom Pedro II and the Uruguayan and Argentine presidents met there to discuss the war effort and take back the town, which would eventually surrender to the Brazilians. It witnessed one of the most badass scenes in Brazilian history, when the Emperor rode within a rifle's range of the town's defenders and challenged them to shoot at him, which they did not.

Humaitá: the major Paraguayan stronghold throughout the war, the citadel of Humaitá was a powerful military installation which blocked access to the Paraguay River. Its conquest by Brazilian troops was a turning point in the war.

Assunción: Paraguay's capital city and major theatre of war.

Temporary secondary locations (like Vianna):

Cerro Corã: the place of Solano Lopez's last stand and death, the final battle of the Paraguayan War.

Paris (much like Florence in ACB): Dom Pedro II dies there and it would be nice to have the Assassin at his side. Seeing Paris, or part of it, would be awesome too.

----

I suppose Ubi could squeeze in a Frontier-type location in order to connect the various theaters of war in Paraguay, but it doesn't need to be as detailed as in AC3.

I realize that this is a ****load of new locations, but I suspect the engine could handle it, since AC: Brazil would be a next generation game.




You show a great depth of knowledge for your country which is brilliant. I'm really looking forwards to your Olympic games in the future and hope it will be a big old party. I might even see if I can get over and join in. I'd love to see another beaut of a velodrome so my country can win some more golds (I'm British). Anyway, back to the topic.

The backdrop you have described sounds like a great idea but I struggle to see the motive for actually being there. In previous games we have been travelling through history to obtain information so we can find PoEs, artefacts and locations to aid in our fight against the Templer cause. But now the fight has taken a new direction. Now the threat comes from Juno, and maybe I'm wrong here, but we don't know what is required to defeat her. So, returning to my question, why go to Brazil?
You make a good point here. I suspect that Ubi intends to continue the AC series without the modern stuff once Juno's storyline is finished, which it will eventually be. AC has grown as a franchise and is the best thing Ubisoft has ever created. I don't think it would be buried after a couple more games,

This specific game would be about an ordinary fight between the Assassins and Templars, which has been going on for thousands of years, but without the interference from TWCB. It would be a traditional fight for power and influence, with the only Sci-Fy element being the PoE itself.

Black_Widow9
01-28-2013, 04:51 AM
Hello and welcome to the Forums :D
Please make sure you post this here:
http://forums.ubi.com/showthread.php/662609

Thanks ;)