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View Full Version : Gentlemen and women, If you Would indulge, I believe you may find this interesting reading..1 PIC



Taylortony
04-22-2004, 05:21 PM
Paint Skins is an enjoyable Hobby, one gets the chance to research as accurately as possible the information available both online and in books to present an accurate and highly realistic skin and this is what I endeavour to do, to bring you the most accurate paintschemes possible using all the information available to me. However once in a while the information presented exceeds my wildest dreams in both in terms of availability and accuracy, through my Co Author of this Skin Mr F.D'Amico I have received information from Colonel Dow himself, the Actual Combat Pilot Of Screaming Red *** Commander and Commanding Officer of the 347th Fighter Squadron to correct a couple of Items, I think this is a first having the Actual Fighter Pilot assisting to produce as accurate an aircraft skin as possible, I was requested to add the following text from one the most unassuming people I have read and as such I am pleased too.

Anthony Taylor's computer rendition of my old flying machine, "Screaming Red *** Commander", is outstanding. However, looking back at it from a distance of almost sixty years now, it
seems like the ultimate, customized, ego trip,war machine. But as time has revealed it apparently is a one of a kind paint job on a combat aircraft. At that time, December 44, I had just turned 22 and in one of my youthful excesses I either initiated or concurred in having both my enemy air (2 Me-109s) and my (3) ground strafing aircraft scores depicted together on the side of the Jug at the time we deciding on the paint scheme. In a tightly knit group of men totally consumed with the same mission, where everyone knew what the scores represented, it seemed quite appropriate at the time.
But, today, in the context of the larger world, (one that we all had yet to experience) this co-mingling of the two categories seems quite out of place to this same old warrior. Thus, while I do not mind sharing a rendition of this unique war bird on the internet, in the interest of accuracy, I request that the depiction of my old Thunderbolt fighter be accompanied by this explanation when ever it is displayed on a Web page. Hugh D. Dow

I was not flying my aircraft on the day I was shot down. However, the following day it was in-commission and was fully loaded with bombs, ammunition and a belly tank for operations.
Unfortunately, it got no further than the runway, that day. Lt. Larry Wells, who I flew several missions with, blew a tire on SCRAC during take-off and when it ran off the runway it shed its landing gear and ended up on its belly. Fortunately, it did not burn and of course the bombs still had the arming wires inserted so they did not explode. Recently, I learned that the old machine did survive and was rebuilt to fly another day. An extract from his message reports: 1st Lt. Wayne H. Smith (347 Sq.) went down with 42-28961 (re-named Betty Jean at the time) on 3 Apr 45 following a dive bombing mission to Colorno.
Statements in the report by the pilots Joseph Pickerel and Delbert Wylder indicate that Smith's parachute got caught on the tail when he tried to bail out. That was one of several 'double losses' suffered during strafing or dive bombing attacks.
Shortly before his death, Smith had been overheard calling for his Flight Leader, Lt Norman K. Hubbard, to bail out! Hubbard was KIA, with Smith being the only eye witness-his call to Hubbard constituting the only information we have on what happened to him. Others on the ground who observed the crash could still be alive, of course. But, returning to 42-28961, like dozens of other 350th Jugs, the odds finally caught up with my old bird, unfortunately, taking young Smith down with it.
I don't know the particulars on Marguerite, the bird I was photographed with after returning from a mission. It was just another 'pick up' substitute for a mission I flew when my SRAC was out of commission. "Lillian" was the bird I was flying the day I was shot down.

Turning to Anthony Taylor's art work, I have a couple of corrections to offer.

I am sure that my name and rank (below the canopy) were in black paint-not red. Also, as I recall, it read: Maj. Hugh D. "Rowdy" Dow. And, I think it was a type of script presentation, as opposed to block letters. I don't want to try to find a copy right now but it should be possible to confirm those points, with a photo?

Another change that needs to be made is to paint the big A on the tail, red in color, not black.
I haven't seen a photograph to confirm it but I'm almost certain that the logo, "Screaming Red *** Commander" was painted down both sides of the fuselage.

While it's a nit-pick, in the interest of accuracy, it should be known that the USAAF helmets we wore in Europe had a black leather exterior (Istill have one) and we ALWAYS wore our oxygen masks when airborne-themicrophone was in the mask and no fighter pilot would fly without it'glued' to his face, even on a 'test' hop around the pattern. However,that said, some pilots would sometimes disconnect their mask (on the leftside only) on the way home, when well beyond enemy fighter engagement range, to light up a cigarette. Not smart since fire and oxygen don't exist side by side very well, but, what the heck, a risk none gave a hoot about, under the circumstance. Still, it was frowned on and was done out of the sight of others.

Finally, our mission was fighter-bomber work. As such, almost every mission started out as a dive bombing mission, followed afterward by a reconnoiter of the area for strafing targets,
depending on the weather, fuel remaining and the flight leader's aggressiveness. Because we wanted as much time over target as possible, we also carried a 110 gallon belly tank shackled to the fuselage, almost always. (Fighters are still so encumbered). Because they were expensive, the only time we dropped them was when enemy aircraft were spotted or when a pilot got into trouble after severe flak damage. And not always, then-'out of sight, out of mind'. In an emergency, sometimes the pilot simply forgot to dump it. I know of at least one crash landing after AAA damage where the tank was still on. While most of the fuel had probably been expended, this one exploded on impact and may have been the major factor in the pilot's death?
Also, on many missions from October 44 to the end of the war, and particularly during the final battle for the Po Valley, six 4.5 folding fin rockets were carried on flights, most in conjunction with two 500 pound bombs. The only missions I know of that were flown over enemy territory without two 500 pound bombs and the drop tank installed were some of the 2 and 4 ship Armed Reccy flights flown near the end of the war in support of our front line ground troops. (When two 1000 pound bombs were carried, I believe that the drop tank was removed, in most cases).

In the final battle there was a need for constant overhead coverage, if possible, to look for and strafe opposing enemy ground forces, or to be on Combat Air Patrol overhead, waiting for targets to be identified for attack by "Rover Joe" and "Horsefly" forward ground and air controllers. Naturally, it took much more time to load bombs and refuel the drop tank than to refuel just the internal wing tanks-before sending the aircraft right back into action. However, under these battle conditions almost all of our Jugs carried the six 4.5 rockets in addition to their load of 3,200 rounds of 50 caliber ammunition. The rockets were notoriously inaccurate but you could 'kill' a tank with them if you scored a direct hit.

Let's not forget our fourth Squadron-the First Brazilian Fighter Squadron. As you know they flew aircraft painted in an olive drab color with the Flight and single digit number ID on the nose. Their Squadron emblem showing an ostrich is quite colorful. Hope I didn't wear out my welcome with all the add-ons-and that some of this helps.

Cheers,
Rowdy

I hope you all enjoy this updated version of the skin produced by all 3 of us. Enjoy. TonyT

This is not an "ego trip" By me, and I am to be truthfull quite embarrased by the comments made by this of most unassuming people to the screenshots we sent to Colonel Dow, but in the interest of total accuracy I have updated the skin and posted it at IL2skins.com , but i felt you would all enjoy this personal Insight into the actual combat operations of this aircraft from the actual pilot of the aircraft, A true veteran and hero....
http://www.il2skins.com/?action=display&skinid=11067

http://mysite.freeserve.com/IL2_Skins/P47/SRAC_1.jpg

Taylortony
04-22-2004, 05:21 PM
Paint Skins is an enjoyable Hobby, one gets the chance to research as accurately as possible the information available both online and in books to present an accurate and highly realistic skin and this is what I endeavour to do, to bring you the most accurate paintschemes possible using all the information available to me. However once in a while the information presented exceeds my wildest dreams in both in terms of availability and accuracy, through my Co Author of this Skin Mr F.D'Amico I have received information from Colonel Dow himself, the Actual Combat Pilot Of Screaming Red *** Commander and Commanding Officer of the 347th Fighter Squadron to correct a couple of Items, I think this is a first having the Actual Fighter Pilot assisting to produce as accurate an aircraft skin as possible, I was requested to add the following text from one the most unassuming people I have read and as such I am pleased too.

Anthony Taylor's computer rendition of my old flying machine, "Screaming Red *** Commander", is outstanding. However, looking back at it from a distance of almost sixty years now, it
seems like the ultimate, customized, ego trip,war machine. But as time has revealed it apparently is a one of a kind paint job on a combat aircraft. At that time, December 44, I had just turned 22 and in one of my youthful excesses I either initiated or concurred in having both my enemy air (2 Me-109s) and my (3) ground strafing aircraft scores depicted together on the side of the Jug at the time we deciding on the paint scheme. In a tightly knit group of men totally consumed with the same mission, where everyone knew what the scores represented, it seemed quite appropriate at the time.
But, today, in the context of the larger world, (one that we all had yet to experience) this co-mingling of the two categories seems quite out of place to this same old warrior. Thus, while I do not mind sharing a rendition of this unique war bird on the internet, in the interest of accuracy, I request that the depiction of my old Thunderbolt fighter be accompanied by this explanation when ever it is displayed on a Web page. Hugh D. Dow

I was not flying my aircraft on the day I was shot down. However, the following day it was in-commission and was fully loaded with bombs, ammunition and a belly tank for operations.
Unfortunately, it got no further than the runway, that day. Lt. Larry Wells, who I flew several missions with, blew a tire on SCRAC during take-off and when it ran off the runway it shed its landing gear and ended up on its belly. Fortunately, it did not burn and of course the bombs still had the arming wires inserted so they did not explode. Recently, I learned that the old machine did survive and was rebuilt to fly another day. An extract from his message reports: 1st Lt. Wayne H. Smith (347 Sq.) went down with 42-28961 (re-named Betty Jean at the time) on 3 Apr 45 following a dive bombing mission to Colorno.
Statements in the report by the pilots Joseph Pickerel and Delbert Wylder indicate that Smith's parachute got caught on the tail when he tried to bail out. That was one of several 'double losses' suffered during strafing or dive bombing attacks.
Shortly before his death, Smith had been overheard calling for his Flight Leader, Lt Norman K. Hubbard, to bail out! Hubbard was KIA, with Smith being the only eye witness-his call to Hubbard constituting the only information we have on what happened to him. Others on the ground who observed the crash could still be alive, of course. But, returning to 42-28961, like dozens of other 350th Jugs, the odds finally caught up with my old bird, unfortunately, taking young Smith down with it.
I don't know the particulars on Marguerite, the bird I was photographed with after returning from a mission. It was just another 'pick up' substitute for a mission I flew when my SRAC was out of commission. "Lillian" was the bird I was flying the day I was shot down.

Turning to Anthony Taylor's art work, I have a couple of corrections to offer.

I am sure that my name and rank (below the canopy) were in black paint-not red. Also, as I recall, it read: Maj. Hugh D. "Rowdy" Dow. And, I think it was a type of script presentation, as opposed to block letters. I don't want to try to find a copy right now but it should be possible to confirm those points, with a photo?

Another change that needs to be made is to paint the big A on the tail, red in color, not black.
I haven't seen a photograph to confirm it but I'm almost certain that the logo, "Screaming Red *** Commander" was painted down both sides of the fuselage.

While it's a nit-pick, in the interest of accuracy, it should be known that the USAAF helmets we wore in Europe had a black leather exterior (Istill have one) and we ALWAYS wore our oxygen masks when airborne-themicrophone was in the mask and no fighter pilot would fly without it'glued' to his face, even on a 'test' hop around the pattern. However,that said, some pilots would sometimes disconnect their mask (on the leftside only) on the way home, when well beyond enemy fighter engagement range, to light up a cigarette. Not smart since fire and oxygen don't exist side by side very well, but, what the heck, a risk none gave a hoot about, under the circumstance. Still, it was frowned on and was done out of the sight of others.

Finally, our mission was fighter-bomber work. As such, almost every mission started out as a dive bombing mission, followed afterward by a reconnoiter of the area for strafing targets,
depending on the weather, fuel remaining and the flight leader's aggressiveness. Because we wanted as much time over target as possible, we also carried a 110 gallon belly tank shackled to the fuselage, almost always. (Fighters are still so encumbered). Because they were expensive, the only time we dropped them was when enemy aircraft were spotted or when a pilot got into trouble after severe flak damage. And not always, then-'out of sight, out of mind'. In an emergency, sometimes the pilot simply forgot to dump it. I know of at least one crash landing after AAA damage where the tank was still on. While most of the fuel had probably been expended, this one exploded on impact and may have been the major factor in the pilot's death?
Also, on many missions from October 44 to the end of the war, and particularly during the final battle for the Po Valley, six 4.5 folding fin rockets were carried on flights, most in conjunction with two 500 pound bombs. The only missions I know of that were flown over enemy territory without two 500 pound bombs and the drop tank installed were some of the 2 and 4 ship Armed Reccy flights flown near the end of the war in support of our front line ground troops. (When two 1000 pound bombs were carried, I believe that the drop tank was removed, in most cases).

In the final battle there was a need for constant overhead coverage, if possible, to look for and strafe opposing enemy ground forces, or to be on Combat Air Patrol overhead, waiting for targets to be identified for attack by "Rover Joe" and "Horsefly" forward ground and air controllers. Naturally, it took much more time to load bombs and refuel the drop tank than to refuel just the internal wing tanks-before sending the aircraft right back into action. However, under these battle conditions almost all of our Jugs carried the six 4.5 rockets in addition to their load of 3,200 rounds of 50 caliber ammunition. The rockets were notoriously inaccurate but you could 'kill' a tank with them if you scored a direct hit.

Let's not forget our fourth Squadron-the First Brazilian Fighter Squadron. As you know they flew aircraft painted in an olive drab color with the Flight and single digit number ID on the nose. Their Squadron emblem showing an ostrich is quite colorful. Hope I didn't wear out my welcome with all the add-ons-and that some of this helps.

Cheers,
Rowdy

I hope you all enjoy this updated version of the skin produced by all 3 of us. Enjoy. TonyT

This is not an "ego trip" By me, and I am to be truthfull quite embarrased by the comments made by this of most unassuming people to the screenshots we sent to Colonel Dow, but in the interest of total accuracy I have updated the skin and posted it at IL2skins.com , but i felt you would all enjoy this personal Insight into the actual combat operations of this aircraft from the actual pilot of the aircraft, A true veteran and hero....
http://www.il2skins.com/?action=display&skinid=11067

http://mysite.freeserve.com/IL2_Skins/P47/SRAC_1.jpg

TgD Thunderbolt56
04-22-2004, 06:09 PM
Thx Tony. Interesting read and glad to see the interest from the real "McCoy"



http://home.earthlink.net/~aclzkim1/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/il2sig2.jpg

-HH-Dubbo
04-22-2004, 06:20 PM
Great read Tony. Nice skin. Straight from the horse's mouth...

http://www.angelfire.com/falcon/nightschpanker/crashoz.jpg
Kermit the Frog is actually a south paw.

SKULLS Virga
04-22-2004, 06:21 PM
Very cool Tony...

Thanks a bunch.

SeaFireLIV
04-22-2004, 06:22 PM
I`m sorry, but i just can`t read all of that right now. Later, I will. Skin looks great though!

SeaFireLIV...



http://img12.photobucket.com/albums/v31/SeaFireLIV/Sveno.jpg

`FLY my children! FLY!`

BaldieJr
04-22-2004, 06:28 PM
The name kills me. Thats funny stuff.

<pre class="ip-ubbcode-code-pre">
______ _____
(, / ) /) /) , (, /
/---( _ // _(/ _ / __ ,""""]
+----/ ____)(_(_(/_(_(__(__(/____/__/ (__--------,' /---+
| / ( / ,' NR / |
|(_/ ..-""``"'-._ (_/ __,' 42 _/ |
+-.-"" "-..,____________/7,.--"" __]-----+

</pre>

Maple_Tiger
04-22-2004, 08:15 PM
Intertesting read Taylortony, thank you for for shairing.

Capt. 361stMapleTiger.
http://img52.photobucket.com/albums/v158/Maple_Tiger/FBAA2.gif
Proud member of the FBAA and Nutty Philosohpy Club.

vanelvis
04-22-2004, 08:48 PM
Cool Read http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Eagle_361st
04-22-2004, 09:33 PM
Wow thanks Tony. Excellent skin, and the story was great. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

~S!
Eagle
Commanding Officer 361st vFG
www.361stvfg.com (http://www.361stvfg.com)
http://home.comcast.net/~smconlon/wsb/media/245357/site1079.jpg

DONB3397
04-22-2004, 09:50 PM
Wonderful story. Thanks for sharing it. If you correspond with him again, find out who gave his plane the "Screaming Red*** Commander" moniker...and why.

http://us.f2.yahoofs.com/bc/3fe77b7e_1812a/bc/Images/Sig---1.jpg?BCOPJiABHzPYLZQo
"And now I see with eye serene/The very pulse of the machine;
A being breathing thoughtful breath,/A Traveller between life and death."
-- William Wordsworth

tHeBaLrOgRoCkS
04-23-2004, 12:47 AM
Good read Thanks S!

Taylortony
04-23-2004, 01:21 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by DONB3397:
Wonderful story. Thanks for sharing it. If you correspond with him again, find out who gave his plane the "Screaming Red*** Commander" moniker...and why.

http://us.f2.yahoofs.com/bc/3fe77b7e_1812a/bc/Images/Sig---1.jpg?BCOPJiABHzPYLZQo
"And now I see with eye serene/The very pulse of the machine;
A being breathing thoughtful breath,/A Traveller between life and death."
-- William Wordsworth<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The name derives from the squadron badge of a Red A$$ the 347th were called the Screaming Red A$$ and as the commanding officer of the 347th Fighter Squadron, Commander was added to it http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif to produce the name for his personal Aircraft.

Freycinet
04-23-2004, 01:54 AM
It would be nice if the Man got a chance to fly his plane in FB, would it be possible to lug a computer over to his place and get a report of his opinion of the sim?

CH_D-Fender
04-23-2004, 03:38 AM
I didn't read, because I don't scroll left and right !

Your pic is tooooooooooo large !!

D-Fender

Cajun76
04-23-2004, 03:48 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Freycinet:
It would be nice if the Man got a chance to fly his plane in FB, would it be possible to lug a computer over to his place and get a report of his opinion of the sim?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks Taylortony. Good stuff. And forget about lugging a PC over there, I'd buy the man a copy if he wanted me to. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Good hunting,
Cajun76

http://img12.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/Real_35a.gif
What if there were no hypothetical questions?

Cajun76
04-23-2004, 03:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CH_D-Fender:
I didn't read, because I don't scroll left and right !

Your pic is tooooooooooo large !!

D-Fender<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You must be using a lower resolution than 1024 X 768, I see it just fine at 1600 X 1200, and it would be good at 1280 X 1024, I bet. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Good hunting,
Cajun76

http://img12.photobucket.com/albums/v30/Cajun76/Real_35a.gif
What if there were no hypothetical questions?

T_O_A_D
04-23-2004, 04:11 AM
Thanks Tony and tell the others Thanks aswell S!

Have you checked your Private Topics recently? (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?a=ugtpc&s=400102)
131st_Toad's Squad link (http://www.geocities.com/vfw_131st/)
My TrackIR fix, Read the whole thread (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums?q=Y&a=tpc&s=400102&f=49310655&m=15310285&p=1)
2.11 drivers (http://home.mchsi.com/~131st-vfw/NaturalPoint_trackIR_2_11.exe)
http://home.mchsi.com/~131st_vfw/T_O_A_D.jpg

Extreme_One
04-23-2004, 05:46 AM
Kudos to you mate.
Well done - lovely skin!

S! Simon
'''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''' '''''
Download the USAAF & RAF campaign folders here (http://www.netwings.org/library/Forgotten_Battles/Missions/index-10.html).

Download "North and South" including the Japanese speech-pack here (http://www.netwings.org/library/Forgotten_Battles/Missions/index-12.html). *NEW*

http://server5.uploadit.org/files/simplysimon-spit_sig.jpg

veltro_205
04-23-2004, 08:03 AM
Sorry if I am intervening so late, but I think it could be interesting to have a glimpse at the photographs of the real aircraft that Tony reproduces so well.

Here are the only two shots known so far of the P-47D "Screaming Red A$$ Commander...

http://users.libero.it/f.damico/veltro/Dow_1a.jpg

http://users.libero.it/f.damico/veltro/Dow_2a.jpg

Hope you will enjoy them.

All the best

Ferdinando D'Amico

LilHorse
04-23-2004, 09:42 AM
Great write up. Nice skin. I'm always glad to see truly historical skins done well. Nice job.