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Bearcat99
04-21-2004, 06:17 PM
Oscar F. Perdomo - The Last Ace In a Day of WW II.
Written by Santiago A. Flores.
1st Lt. Oscar Perdomo 464th FS, 507thFG, with the engineering officer of the FG after his historic mission.

INTRODUCTION

Becoming an Ace in A Day is an honor that has fallen to a number of fighter pilots around the world since the days of World War One. But the singular honor of being the last “Ace in Day” for the United States and possibly the last one for World War II, is held by 1st Lt. Oscar Francis Perdomo of the 464th fighter squadron, 507th fighter Group USAAF. On his tenth and and last combat sortie of the war, he achieved the distinction of being the last Ace of the war; an honor held by a American pilot of Mexican ancestry to this day.

THE PILOT
Oscar Francis Perdomo was born on June 14th, 1919 at El Paso, Texas of Mexican parents, five years later his family move to Los Angeles, California. When the war broke out after obtaining the necessary education credits he joined the USAAF as an aviation cadet on February 13, 1943. On January 7th, 1944 Perdomo received his wings, after graduation he served as a flight instructor, but he put in his request to serve overseas. Which got him posted to the 464th fighter squadron in October 1944.

After a period of training, the 507th fighter group in which the 464th, was part of (463rd and 465th fighter squadrons were also from part of the group) went overseas to the Pacific to the Island of Ie Shima off the west coast of Okinawa with their Republic P-47N-2-RE Thunderbolt fighter Bombers. The group was to form part of the 8th Air Force that was moving from the ETO to the Pacific, with the mission to protect their B-29 bombers. But while the 8th was getting there the 507th was assigned to the 20th Air Force but operated under the tactical direction of the 7th Air Force.

The 507th, began operations against Japan on July 1st, 1945. Perdomo was assigned P-47N-2-RE number 146 aircraft serial number 44-88211, his crew chief was S/Sgt. F. W. Pozieky. Perdomo named his P-47 Lil Meaties Meat Chooper with the artwork showing a baby in a Diaper, striding along with a cigar in his mouth and hat on his head, clutching a rifle. He had named his aircraft after his first son, Kenneth C. born on January 27, 1944.

Perdomo flew his first combat mission on July 2, an escort to Kyushu, which totaled 5.5 hours, he would fly more escort missions, dive- bombing missions and search and rescue etc.

THE MISSION
Perdomo flew another five hour mission on August 7th, so far he had not scored any aerial victories and the war was coming to a close. The atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9th, but while the allies awaited Japan’s response to the demand to surrender, the war continued.

On August 13th, the 507th was assigned mission number 507-35, to search the vicinity of Keijo (Seoul) Korea, for airborne enemy aircraft and to engage them if found. Take off was to begin at 0953. A total of 53 P-47’s from all three squadrons of the 507th were scheduled to participate, but after mechanical failures and aborts only 38 reached the target area. (12 each from the 463rd & 465th and 14 from 464th) The course was set from base to Nagasaki, Kyushu to Korea arriving near or around Keijo (Seoul) at about 1315 hours. Approximately 50 enemy aircraft were sighted and engaged from 8,000 ft (2,430m) to the decks.

The first kill was claimed by Capt. Edward R. Hoyt of the 465, when he shot-down a Mitsubishi G4M Betty Bomber. At this juncture, Major James J. Jarman (leading the 464th with 1st Lt. Perdomo in his flight) descended to engage what was at that time identified as a Nakajima Ki-43 Oscar fighter as it turned out, three more of them would appeared from the clouds.

Perdomo described what happened in his combat report:
I pushed the throttle into water injection with the prop pitch at about 2,700 rpm. As I gained on the Oscars, I placed my gyro sight on the last one and adjusted the sight diamonds on his wings. At this time the Oscars were flying a very loose vee. When I closed into firing range I gave him a burst and saw my bullets converge on his nose and cockpit. Something exploded in his engine and fire broke out. I was still shooting as he fell to the right.

After gaining his first kill, Perdomo went after the second Oscar:

I lined him up immediately on the second ship and began firing at about 30 degrees. I shot at this Oscar until parts flew off and fire broke out on the bottom cowling of his engine. I ceased firing when he rolled over slowly and dove straight into the ground and exploded.

He closed on the third Oscar:

I caught him in my fixed sight and led him as much as I could, firing all the way. He continued his spiral- turn about 180 degree until he was about 100 ft off the ground. Then he hit a high speed stall, because I saw his aircraft shudder, and it snapped him still tighter to the left and into the ground where he exploded like an oversized napalm bomb.

After shooting down the third Oscar, he headed back to town, where he saw the fire from his first kill. Almost simultaneously he spotted a parachute descending and identified the green-clad man below it as a Japanese pilot. He put his sights on him and passed by, rocking his wings. Perdomo them climbed to look for any other P-47’s and encountered two Willow biplane trainers (Yokosuka Type 93 Intermediate Trainer K5Y) flying in formation. He after them and the Willows separated as Perdomo reported:

I picked the closet to me and started shooting. Flames broke out almost immediately. To slow my ship I crossed my controls and skidded. Them I shot more at him. This time I must have hit the pilot because the ship went into a spiral to the right and straight into the ground about 300 feet below.

After seeing the Willow explode. He tried to locate the other one, but it had escaped. He started to climb above the clouds, when three or four Oscars broke out above him and to the right. He turned into them and pointed his nose down, hoping they had not seen him. But at the last moment they pushed down on him. He shot under them, poured water injection on, and turned into the clouds. The Oscars made a half-hearted turn, but by them Perdomo was above and behind:

As I came in on these Oscars three of them turned to the left and one turned right I followed this single one and used my gyro sight. His only evasive maneuvers were turns. I shot at him in bursts until he flamed. He exploded when I pulled alongside because of the excessive speed. The mass of flames went into the ground.

He headed back to the city and the rest of the group. Over the airfield he saw two of the group's P-47s,chasing an Oscar that turned on the P-47s. Perdomo dived on the Oscar, engaging it shooting until his ammo ran out. The Oscar turned on him, as he mentions in his report:

I saw a yellow-tailed P-47 out of the corner of my right eye and yelled him to shoot the Oscar off my tail The P-47 I saw turned on the Oscar and began firing. He missed with the first burst, but clobbered him with the second. I saw the Oscar go straight in and explode. I believe the pilot of the P-47 to be Lt. Harry Steinshover.

This is confirmed in 2nd Lt. Harry M. Steinshover combat narrative. He had shot-down an Oscar, at the beginning of the fight, as he reported. After getting the first Oscar the following took place:

I pulled off the target and climbed to 3,000 ft to join my element leader. He (Perdomo) sighted an Oscar about 1,000 ft below us and dived for him. He opened up but ran out of ammunition. His speed carried him under the enemy plane. The Oscar started a turn to the left and my element leader broke right. The Oscar immediately made a sharp turn to the right and opened fire. I close to 1,000 ft and opened fire and the enemy plane started smoking. I fired at him all the way to the ground and he exploded.

By 1345 hours the 507th started the return to Ie Shima with elements landing about 1755 hours, an 8 hour, and 18 minute mission. In total the 507th claimed 20 enemy aircraft plus 2 probables and one Betty bomber on the ground, for the loss of one P-47N of the 464th flown by a pilot who had claimed 2 Oscars during the fight. He was shot-down and bailed out over the sea. He was picked up by the Japanese, and help prisioner at Keijo until the end of the war.

Major Jarman recalled how Perdomos claims were confirmed:

When we landed back at Ie Shima Perdomo shyly stated that he had destroyed five, including one biplane trainer type. Upon developing the gun camera film it was clearly proven that he had actually destroyed five aircraft including the biplane which no else had even seen.

FRANKS NOT OSCARS

It is interesting to note that the type of enemy fighters engaged by the 507th were actually the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate code named Frank from the Japanese Army Air Forces 22ndand 85thSentais. Both Units had been assigned to Kimpo airfield since May 1945.

The 85th Hiko Sentai had been formed since March 1941, and as a veteran unit had seen action in Manchuria and China, claiming the destruction of some 282 enemy aircraft for the loss of 73 pilots. The unit commander was Capt. Morio Nakamura, who had held the post since December 1944.

The 22nd Hiko Sentai was created in March 1944 and was the first Ki-84 unit in the JAAF. It has seen action in Central China, the Philippines and homeland defense, claiming 40 enemy aircraft destroyed and damaged, for the loss of 24 pilots. Its commanding officer was Major Ei-chi Kitajima, who had been appointed in June 1945.

According to the units histories, on August 13, 1945, the 22nd Sentai mustered 20 fighters and loss six of them. The 85th claimed it had been raided by P-51 Mustangs!!!!. It lost five pilots and aircraft, including Capt. Nakamura.

This battle was the last action fought in the war by both units. 1st Lt. Perdomo emerged as the top scorer of the action with five claimed victories, while Capt.Edward R. Hoyt also of the 465th claimed his fifth kill to achieve the title of Ace (the four previous kills were with the 41st FS, 35th FG) in a battle that the 507th earned the Distinguished Unit Citation for its performance that day, the only reported DUC awarded to a P-47 group in the Pacific.

For his personal actions Perdomo received the Air Medal with one leaf cluster and the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism in action. He also won the honors of being the last USAAF pilot to become an “Ace in a Day”, and possibly the last pilot to claim this honor in World War II.

Perdomo would serve in the Air Force until 1958, leaving the service with the rank of Major. He passed away on March 2, 1976 in Los Angeles, California at the age of 56. His body was cremated and his ashes scattered at sea.


Here's the link Ace in a Day (http://www.elknet.pl/acestory/perdomo/perdomo.htm).

Note that... I itallicized and emboldened certain parts.......

1. These were P-47Ns...Thanks 361st Eagle for your hard work in getting the N into FB.... I am hoping it will be in the initial release of PF.

2. They had Gyro sights.........

3. They were using manual prop pitch...

4. They took on the Ki-84s.... and beat them!!!

I know the pilots had something to do with this but I sure hope that the manual pitch comes back, long with manual mix.... at least as an option like on the Me-109s. Maybe Im wrong about the pitch.... since he did say he adjusted to RPMs.

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Bearcat99
04-21-2004, 06:17 PM
Oscar F. Perdomo - The Last Ace In a Day of WW II.
Written by Santiago A. Flores.
1st Lt. Oscar Perdomo 464th FS, 507thFG, with the engineering officer of the FG after his historic mission.

INTRODUCTION

Becoming an Ace in A Day is an honor that has fallen to a number of fighter pilots around the world since the days of World War One. But the singular honor of being the last “Ace in Day” for the United States and possibly the last one for World War II, is held by 1st Lt. Oscar Francis Perdomo of the 464th fighter squadron, 507th fighter Group USAAF. On his tenth and and last combat sortie of the war, he achieved the distinction of being the last Ace of the war; an honor held by a American pilot of Mexican ancestry to this day.

THE PILOT
Oscar Francis Perdomo was born on June 14th, 1919 at El Paso, Texas of Mexican parents, five years later his family move to Los Angeles, California. When the war broke out after obtaining the necessary education credits he joined the USAAF as an aviation cadet on February 13, 1943. On January 7th, 1944 Perdomo received his wings, after graduation he served as a flight instructor, but he put in his request to serve overseas. Which got him posted to the 464th fighter squadron in October 1944.

After a period of training, the 507th fighter group in which the 464th, was part of (463rd and 465th fighter squadrons were also from part of the group) went overseas to the Pacific to the Island of Ie Shima off the west coast of Okinawa with their Republic P-47N-2-RE Thunderbolt fighter Bombers. The group was to form part of the 8th Air Force that was moving from the ETO to the Pacific, with the mission to protect their B-29 bombers. But while the 8th was getting there the 507th was assigned to the 20th Air Force but operated under the tactical direction of the 7th Air Force.

The 507th, began operations against Japan on July 1st, 1945. Perdomo was assigned P-47N-2-RE number 146 aircraft serial number 44-88211, his crew chief was S/Sgt. F. W. Pozieky. Perdomo named his P-47 Lil Meaties Meat Chooper with the artwork showing a baby in a Diaper, striding along with a cigar in his mouth and hat on his head, clutching a rifle. He had named his aircraft after his first son, Kenneth C. born on January 27, 1944.

Perdomo flew his first combat mission on July 2, an escort to Kyushu, which totaled 5.5 hours, he would fly more escort missions, dive- bombing missions and search and rescue etc.

THE MISSION
Perdomo flew another five hour mission on August 7th, so far he had not scored any aerial victories and the war was coming to a close. The atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on August 9th, but while the allies awaited Japan’s response to the demand to surrender, the war continued.

On August 13th, the 507th was assigned mission number 507-35, to search the vicinity of Keijo (Seoul) Korea, for airborne enemy aircraft and to engage them if found. Take off was to begin at 0953. A total of 53 P-47’s from all three squadrons of the 507th were scheduled to participate, but after mechanical failures and aborts only 38 reached the target area. (12 each from the 463rd & 465th and 14 from 464th) The course was set from base to Nagasaki, Kyushu to Korea arriving near or around Keijo (Seoul) at about 1315 hours. Approximately 50 enemy aircraft were sighted and engaged from 8,000 ft (2,430m) to the decks.

The first kill was claimed by Capt. Edward R. Hoyt of the 465, when he shot-down a Mitsubishi G4M Betty Bomber. At this juncture, Major James J. Jarman (leading the 464th with 1st Lt. Perdomo in his flight) descended to engage what was at that time identified as a Nakajima Ki-43 Oscar fighter as it turned out, three more of them would appeared from the clouds.

Perdomo described what happened in his combat report:
I pushed the throttle into water injection with the prop pitch at about 2,700 rpm. As I gained on the Oscars, I placed my gyro sight on the last one and adjusted the sight diamonds on his wings. At this time the Oscars were flying a very loose vee. When I closed into firing range I gave him a burst and saw my bullets converge on his nose and cockpit. Something exploded in his engine and fire broke out. I was still shooting as he fell to the right.

After gaining his first kill, Perdomo went after the second Oscar:

I lined him up immediately on the second ship and began firing at about 30 degrees. I shot at this Oscar until parts flew off and fire broke out on the bottom cowling of his engine. I ceased firing when he rolled over slowly and dove straight into the ground and exploded.

He closed on the third Oscar:

I caught him in my fixed sight and led him as much as I could, firing all the way. He continued his spiral- turn about 180 degree until he was about 100 ft off the ground. Then he hit a high speed stall, because I saw his aircraft shudder, and it snapped him still tighter to the left and into the ground where he exploded like an oversized napalm bomb.

After shooting down the third Oscar, he headed back to town, where he saw the fire from his first kill. Almost simultaneously he spotted a parachute descending and identified the green-clad man below it as a Japanese pilot. He put his sights on him and passed by, rocking his wings. Perdomo them climbed to look for any other P-47’s and encountered two Willow biplane trainers (Yokosuka Type 93 Intermediate Trainer K5Y) flying in formation. He after them and the Willows separated as Perdomo reported:

I picked the closet to me and started shooting. Flames broke out almost immediately. To slow my ship I crossed my controls and skidded. Them I shot more at him. This time I must have hit the pilot because the ship went into a spiral to the right and straight into the ground about 300 feet below.

After seeing the Willow explode. He tried to locate the other one, but it had escaped. He started to climb above the clouds, when three or four Oscars broke out above him and to the right. He turned into them and pointed his nose down, hoping they had not seen him. But at the last moment they pushed down on him. He shot under them, poured water injection on, and turned into the clouds. The Oscars made a half-hearted turn, but by them Perdomo was above and behind:

As I came in on these Oscars three of them turned to the left and one turned right I followed this single one and used my gyro sight. His only evasive maneuvers were turns. I shot at him in bursts until he flamed. He exploded when I pulled alongside because of the excessive speed. The mass of flames went into the ground.

He headed back to the city and the rest of the group. Over the airfield he saw two of the group's P-47s,chasing an Oscar that turned on the P-47s. Perdomo dived on the Oscar, engaging it shooting until his ammo ran out. The Oscar turned on him, as he mentions in his report:

I saw a yellow-tailed P-47 out of the corner of my right eye and yelled him to shoot the Oscar off my tail The P-47 I saw turned on the Oscar and began firing. He missed with the first burst, but clobbered him with the second. I saw the Oscar go straight in and explode. I believe the pilot of the P-47 to be Lt. Harry Steinshover.

This is confirmed in 2nd Lt. Harry M. Steinshover combat narrative. He had shot-down an Oscar, at the beginning of the fight, as he reported. After getting the first Oscar the following took place:

I pulled off the target and climbed to 3,000 ft to join my element leader. He (Perdomo) sighted an Oscar about 1,000 ft below us and dived for him. He opened up but ran out of ammunition. His speed carried him under the enemy plane. The Oscar started a turn to the left and my element leader broke right. The Oscar immediately made a sharp turn to the right and opened fire. I close to 1,000 ft and opened fire and the enemy plane started smoking. I fired at him all the way to the ground and he exploded.

By 1345 hours the 507th started the return to Ie Shima with elements landing about 1755 hours, an 8 hour, and 18 minute mission. In total the 507th claimed 20 enemy aircraft plus 2 probables and one Betty bomber on the ground, for the loss of one P-47N of the 464th flown by a pilot who had claimed 2 Oscars during the fight. He was shot-down and bailed out over the sea. He was picked up by the Japanese, and help prisioner at Keijo until the end of the war.

Major Jarman recalled how Perdomos claims were confirmed:

When we landed back at Ie Shima Perdomo shyly stated that he had destroyed five, including one biplane trainer type. Upon developing the gun camera film it was clearly proven that he had actually destroyed five aircraft including the biplane which no else had even seen.

FRANKS NOT OSCARS

It is interesting to note that the type of enemy fighters engaged by the 507th were actually the Nakajima Ki-84 Hayate code named Frank from the Japanese Army Air Forces 22ndand 85thSentais. Both Units had been assigned to Kimpo airfield since May 1945.

The 85th Hiko Sentai had been formed since March 1941, and as a veteran unit had seen action in Manchuria and China, claiming the destruction of some 282 enemy aircraft for the loss of 73 pilots. The unit commander was Capt. Morio Nakamura, who had held the post since December 1944.

The 22nd Hiko Sentai was created in March 1944 and was the first Ki-84 unit in the JAAF. It has seen action in Central China, the Philippines and homeland defense, claiming 40 enemy aircraft destroyed and damaged, for the loss of 24 pilots. Its commanding officer was Major Ei-chi Kitajima, who had been appointed in June 1945.

According to the units histories, on August 13, 1945, the 22nd Sentai mustered 20 fighters and loss six of them. The 85th claimed it had been raided by P-51 Mustangs!!!!. It lost five pilots and aircraft, including Capt. Nakamura.

This battle was the last action fought in the war by both units. 1st Lt. Perdomo emerged as the top scorer of the action with five claimed victories, while Capt.Edward R. Hoyt also of the 465th claimed his fifth kill to achieve the title of Ace (the four previous kills were with the 41st FS, 35th FG) in a battle that the 507th earned the Distinguished Unit Citation for its performance that day, the only reported DUC awarded to a P-47 group in the Pacific.

For his personal actions Perdomo received the Air Medal with one leaf cluster and the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism in action. He also won the honors of being the last USAAF pilot to become an “Ace in a Day”, and possibly the last pilot to claim this honor in World War II.

Perdomo would serve in the Air Force until 1958, leaving the service with the rank of Major. He passed away on March 2, 1976 in Los Angeles, California at the age of 56. His body was cremated and his ashes scattered at sea.


Here's the link Ace in a Day (http://www.elknet.pl/acestory/perdomo/perdomo.htm).

Note that... I itallicized and emboldened certain parts.......

1. These were P-47Ns...Thanks 361st Eagle for your hard work in getting the N into FB.... I am hoping it will be in the initial release of PF.

2. They had Gyro sights.........

3. They were using manual prop pitch...

4. They took on the Ki-84s.... and beat them!!!

I know the pilots had something to do with this but I sure hope that the manual pitch comes back, long with manual mix.... at least as an option like on the Me-109s. Maybe Im wrong about the pitch.... since he did say he adjusted to RPMs.

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SithSpeeder
04-21-2004, 06:42 PM
Good read, Bearcat.

You, sir, are a credit to the community.

S!

* _54th_Speeder *

http://members.cox.net/~ijhutch/_images/400x200sig.jpg

SKULLS Virga
04-21-2004, 06:55 PM
Yes very good read - thanks!

Is it your opinion Bearcat that all acft with variable pitch should behave like the 109's with autoprop off?

Bearcat99
04-21-2004, 07:00 PM
The US planes had constant speed props from what I understand, and they behave differently... but I finally got to fully understand prop pitch by flying the 109s.... It would be nice to have the option to use it.. along with a toggle on the mix and supercharger as well. I wonder if it was toggleable (is that a wordhttp://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/53.gif...) on the real planes or if the only option was auto pitch & mix. I know for the most part guys probably used auto mix but it would be nice to be able to switch to manual.. like if you are low on fuel after taking a few hits in the fuel tanks and you want to make it back to base. I do mostly coops and for us making it back to base is part of the fun. Its a drag to run out of fuel with the field in sight an have to do a dead stick landing..where you stall out and crash....

Your question thoughmakes me wonder... is the pitch in the 109s the way any plane with manual pitch would be have? What exactly happens when you switch it to auto? Does it become a CSP? Is there like.... a gear or something that engages and disengages and why CANT we model this in other AC.

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SKULLS Virga
04-21-2004, 07:13 PM
The planes I have flown and been around have all had constant speed props. The propeller hub assembly uses some kind of hydraulically actuated mechanism to move the blades. The pilot chooses the r.p.m., the hub keeps the prop spinning at that r.p.m. (or tries to) regardless of airspeed or what the engine is doing. My knowledge is weak in this area so I am trying to learn more about the difference between the 109's prop system and true constant speed.

It would be cool like you say if there were a little more detailed pilot control over the aircraft. I would love to see cylinder head temperatures and shock cooling modelled. I am not complaining though - we have been given so much already.

tttiger
04-21-2004, 07:58 PM
Excellent, BC! Thank you!

Aside from the prop, it may be worthy of note that these were P47Ns

The N model, while not quite as fast as the M (the fastest prop plane in the war and used in combat only by the 56th FG in Europe) was much faster than the D model.

More important, it had a completely redesigned wing to make room for additional fuel tanks (the N was the long range version of the P-47).

Instead of the eliptical wings of earlier P47s, the N wings had straight edges and clipped wing tips.

The result was a truly ferocious roll rate.

The P47N was a much better fighter than the Ds we have now. It was both faster and more agile.

Hope we see it in the sim http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

ttt

"I want the one that kills the best with the least amount of risk to me"

-- Chuck Yeager describing "The Best Airplane."

Eagle_361st
04-21-2004, 08:05 PM
That's an amazing story Bearcat. I knew that P-47N produced the last Ace in a day, but was unsure who, where, when and how. Thanks for sharing it bro. Now if we can only get the "N" into the game, I will be a very happy man. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

~S!
Eagle
Commanding Officer 361st vFG
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SlickStick
04-21-2004, 09:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by SithSpeeder:
Good read, Bearcat.

You, sir, are a credit to the community.

S!

* _54th_Speeder *

http://members.cox.net/~ijhutch/_images/400x200sig.jpg <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Great read, Bearcat! I second the above statement from Speeder. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

___________________________
çk"*¯k 2004

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IV|JG51Flatspin
04-21-2004, 10:06 PM
Excellent read. Thanks Bearcat!

Y'know, I often scan down the GD page and when I see a thread started by Bearcat I honestly think to myself: Ooh! This is going to be good!

WTG Bearcat!

S!
Flame resistant since 1988
=Elite=Flatspin
XO
The Wings of Freedom (http://www.elitepx.com)

Udidtoo
04-21-2004, 10:12 PM
Thanks for another page in my things I never knew file. I've always considered myself a history buff but this place takes the cake.

Anything from Finnish pilots to the Night Witches to Bader stories to Molders stories to the last allied Ace in a day and on and on and......

..............................
I always have just enough fuel to arrive at the scene of my crash.

Bearcat99
04-21-2004, 10:34 PM
Thank Chris455.. he found it and posted it in the PF forum.

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tHeBaLrOgRoCkS
04-22-2004, 01:55 AM
An interesting read many thanks S!

Dunkelgrun
04-22-2004, 03:45 AM
Cheers Bearcat, always good to learn something new.
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Dunkelgrun aka 242Sqn_Cat