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skissors
02-07-2007, 05:15 PM
Ok, how do you guys Navigate over the Pacific ocean following the Way points as close as possible, with no land marks for reference ?

I have a hard enough time over Land.

Any Clues?

Cheers
Skiss

skissors
02-07-2007, 05:15 PM
Ok, how do you guys Navigate over the Pacific ocean following the Way points as close as possible, with no land marks for reference ?

I have a hard enough time over Land.

Any Clues?

Cheers
Skiss

Heavy_Weather
02-07-2007, 05:30 PM
you'll notice when you call back to base that your compass needle will turn in the direction of your next waypoint. make sure you line up the needle arrow with the waypoint arrow and follow that til it changes or you call for a vector. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Taylortony
02-07-2007, 05:31 PM
press m for map, click mouse on it to zoom it out.. cant remember which mouse button, continue pressing to go back to scale

skissors
02-07-2007, 05:51 PM
So the Pacific fighter planes have Navigation built into the compass. I have to check that out.

I can zoom in and out the map all day, over the pacific, but its still Blue with no landmarks. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif (this is with all icons off so you don't have the icon of your plane)

Covino
02-07-2007, 06:01 PM
You can ask the ground control for 'vector to target,' to get a heading to target.

Then ask the ground control for 'vector to base', to get back home.

edit: and when i say 'target,' I don't mean it only works on bombing missions, I think ground control can vector you to any objective or 'target'

Zeus-cat
02-07-2007, 07:10 PM
The proper way to do it is the way they did it in real life.

1) Use a watch that provides accurate time in minutes and seconds.

2) Measure the distances and the course direction at each waypoint on the briefing map BEFORE you hit fly.

3) Determine how long you need to fly in each direction at the speed you want to fly at. (I hope you paid attention in math class!)

4) Do it.

I have done this on several occasions over land and you can hit your waypoints with a fair degree of accuracy if you are careful.

Treetop64
02-07-2007, 11:11 PM
Might I contribute that Zeus's suggestion is an enormously gratifying method. Once you fly consistently and get it right, of course!

FoolTrottel
02-08-2007, 06:06 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Once you fly consistently and get it right, of course </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gifMe thinks 'on course' is the better choice of words here...

SeaFireLIV
02-08-2007, 06:09 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Zeus-cat:
The proper way to do it is the way they did it in real life.

1) Use a watch that provides accurate time in minutes and seconds.

2) Measure the distances and the course direction at each waypoint on the briefing map BEFORE you hit fly.

3) Determine how long you need to fly in each direction at the speed you want to fly at. (I hope you paid attention in math class!)

4) Do it.

I have done this on several occasions over land and you can hit your waypoints with a fair degree of accuracy if you are careful. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Now this I like. Pity my maths is a bit ropey, but I`ll figure it out...

Skarphol
02-08-2007, 06:26 AM
Is it some way of leaving the waypoints on the map without your plane showing up on the map too? I really don't like the GPS thing, but I would really like to see the waypoints I am supposed to follow..
Printing out the maps in order to draw waypoints on them seems too cumbersome..

Skarphol

nsteense
02-08-2007, 07:26 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Zeus-cat:
The proper way to do it is the way they did it in real life.


2) Measure the distances and the course direction at each waypoint on the briefing map BEFORE you hit fly.


It is still done in real life. Dead reckoning navigation is still a big thing in obtaining a PPL. Had to do it a 150 Nautical miles navigation excersise before I could even think about doing the PPL exam.

How do you measure the distance on the screen? I don't see a scale anywhere to convert the measured distance into a useable value...

Fireball_
02-08-2007, 08:12 AM
And the math is even more intense when trying to find your way back to a moving aircraft carrier.

I really don't know how they did it. Especially if they've had to mix it up over the open ocean with some bad guys. It would be real easy to get off course. Maybe they just computed it as well they could, then spread out in formation and hoped somebody spotted the carrier group.

In real life did they have a compass needle pointing them back to the carrier? It would seem that would risk giving away the carrier's location to the other side.

And were they able to get vectors back to the carrier? Seems like that might run the same risk.

RocketDog
02-08-2007, 08:27 AM
IIRC, Pacific Theatre aircraft carriers had homing beacons for returning aircraft. Even with such help, fatalities caused by getting lost and running out of fuel were not unknown.

RD.

stathem
02-08-2007, 08:30 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by nsteense:


How do you measure the distance on the screen? I don't see a scale anywhere to convert the measured distance into a useable value... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The grid squares on your map are 10km by 10km

So you know if you fly acoss the diagonal of a grid square your dist will be ~14km

I like to make it more difficult for myself by being completely unable to fly around in km/h and metres or knowing the TAS/IAS conversion for metric units and so have to convert all the km distances into miles before setting off.

p-11.cAce
02-08-2007, 08:40 AM
Navigating by heading and time is really great fun imho - the more I try to be "real" the more I enjoy the sim. For practice I built a simple mission in the FMB with the "radio towers" (I think they are racing turn point markers) to mark my turnpoints and try to overfly them at pre-determined times, altitudes, and speeds. Sometimes this is more satisfying than combat.

nsteense
02-09-2007, 02:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stathem:
[QUOTE]

The grid squares on your map are 10km by 10km

So you know if you fly acoss the diagonal of a grid square your dist will be ~14km

I like to make it more difficult for myself by being completely unable to fly around in km/h and metres or knowing the TAS/IAS conversion for metric units and so have to convert all the km distances into miles before setting off. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, if you use the navigation computer as used by every student pilot (I guess most pilots these days are getting a bit lazy because of GPS), you can convert the IAS into CAS more or less accurate. To convert it in TAS, you would need to know the windspeeds and direction at altitude. I don't know if this in the game, the higher you go, the higher the windspeeds are.

By the way, I probably will get some very strange looks from my girlfriend when I hold my ruler against the screen measuring distances. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

whiteladder
02-09-2007, 02:54 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">1) Use a watch that provides accurate time in minutes and seconds. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


If the aircraft you flying in has a clock on the instrument panel(some do) use that as any pauses or stutters in the game will also "stop the clock" as well, better to use Olegian time than real time if possible.

Flying_Nutcase
02-09-2007, 02:56 AM
An E6B is a great tool for this game, making it that bit more simmish, if there be such a word. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

slipBall
02-09-2007, 03:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by whiteladder:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">1) Use a watch that provides accurate time in minutes and seconds. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


If the aircraft you flying in has a clock on the instrument panel(some do) use that as any pauses or stutters in the game will also "stop the clock" as well, better to use Olegian time than real time if possible. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Not a good idea, because
"Olegian time" allways equals 2 weeks http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

whiteladder
02-09-2007, 03:06 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">"Olegian time" allways equals 2 weeks </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ok let me revise that then:

Don`t blind bomb using Olegian time as you may have some navigational errors, hit the wrong country and start a diplomatic incedent. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

stathem
02-09-2007, 05:20 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by nsteense:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stathem:
[QUOTE]

The grid squares on your map are 10km by 10km

So you know if you fly acoss the diagonal of a grid square your dist will be ~14km

I like to make it more difficult for myself by being completely unable to fly around in km/h and metres or knowing the TAS/IAS conversion for metric units and so have to convert all the km distances into miles before setting off. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, if you use the navigation computer as used by every student pilot (I guess most pilots these days are getting a bit lazy because of GPS), you can convert the IAS into CAS more or less accurate. To convert it in TAS, you would need to know the windspeeds and direction at altitude. I don't know if this in the game, the higher you go, the higher the windspeeds are. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ah, right. I'm afraid that the only time I navigate an 'aircraft' is in this sim, and I'm pretty sure that there is no windspeed here (or not any that impacts noticeably over the disatnces that we travel) on airspeed.


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by nsteense:
By the way, I probably will get some very strange looks from my girlfriend when I hold my ruler against the screen measuring distances. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I tend to look at it like, "if my next waypoint or target is 8 grid squares away on a heading of 90' then I have to fly 80km (or 50 miles) at eg 250mph true etc etc". I confess that my navigation is 'on the fly' so to speak, and so long as I have a ground feature at the turn point to check I'm there within vis. distance, that's a result. I don't think I'd ever blind bomb on DR - probably be about as succesful as the RAF were in 1940.