PDA

View Full Version : WW2 books from the Japanese perspective



pogobbler
10-20-2010, 12:47 PM
There always seem to be so many knowledgeable and helpful people on here, I thought I'd ask about good books in English about WW2 more from the perspective of the Japanese side. I'm trying to make up for a faux pas yesterday by getting a friend a couple such books. Thanks in advance!!

pogobbler
10-20-2010, 12:47 PM
There always seem to be so many knowledgeable and helpful people on here, I thought I'd ask about good books in English about WW2 more from the perspective of the Japanese side. I'm trying to make up for a faux pas yesterday by getting a friend a couple such books. Thanks in advance!!

R_Target
10-20-2010, 03:22 PM
Japan at War: An Oral History, Haruko Taya Cook & Theodore F. Cook.

Japan's War, Edwin P. Hoyt.

The first book in particular exposed me to information and insights that I had not previously considered.

For air combat, anything by John Lundstrom or Henry Sakaida will give you a balanced perspective from both sides.

saipan1972
10-20-2010, 03:23 PM
samurai by sabaru sakai. must have for any collection. great read, lots of info. he was the highest scoring japanses ace to survive the war

Wildnoob
10-20-2010, 03:31 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by saipan1972:
samurai by sabaru sakai. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No, by Martin Caidin and his fictional view of Sakai. Sakai didn't even knew Caidin. He wrote a book though, but was only published in Japan.

The book is still interesting, but remember that was written by Caidin and he put many things the own Sakai disagreed.

Boosher
10-20-2010, 05:33 PM
Caidin has some... interesting books out there, but they seem more like enthusiastic reads than factual accounts.

Trinity_Jay
10-21-2010, 01:17 AM
I commissioned Ed Dyer to pen Japanese Secret Projects.

Oops. Got to be careful - might get this thread locked for being 'commercial'. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

Jay
jslater@thehistorypress.co.uk

TX-Gunslinger
10-21-2010, 01:57 AM
Hi Boosher!

+1 on your and Wildnoob's comments on ANY Caidin book.

Sakai had the honor to confront this publicly, helping to expose many of the "myths" Caidin created, by shameful embellishment, that previous authors and WW2 Aces had tried to say.

S!

Gunny

JG53Frankyboy
10-21-2010, 04:03 AM
i found "Gendas Blade" an interesting read.

http://www.amazon.com/Gendas-B...okutai/dp/1903223253 (http://www.amazon.com/Gendas-Blade-Japans-Squadron-Kokutai/dp/1903223253)

R_Target
10-21-2010, 10:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JG53Frankyboy:
i found "Gendas Blade" an interesting read. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'll second that. Also, Sakaida's Winged Samurai: Saburo Sakai and the Zero Fighter Pilots is the book to get for Sakai's story.

idonno
10-21-2010, 11:25 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by TX-Gunslinger:

Sakai had the honor to confront this publicly, helping to expose many of the "myths" Caidin created...

Gunny </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Such as?

ytareh
10-21-2010, 11:35 AM
I Was a Kamikaze
by Ryuji Nagatsuka

http://wgordon.web.wesleyan.ed.../nagatsuka/index.htm (http://wgordon.web.wesleyan.edu/kamikaze/books/personal/nagatsuka/index.htm)

Good read .He served in Ki45s as well!

berg417448
10-21-2010, 12:55 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by idonno:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by TX-Gunslinger:

Sakai had the honor to confront this publicly, helping to expose many of the "myths" Caidin created...

Gunny </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Such as? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

some info here:

http://www.warbirdforum.com/wingsams.htm

Art-J
10-21-2010, 12:57 PM
Nah... Only infantry and airmen memoirs here? I'd also recommend something from a sailor's point of view: "Japanese Destroyer Captain" by Capt. Tameichi Hara, one of the very few officers who took part in most major naval battles of the war and somehow didn't get killed!

And for something completely different: "I Saw Tokyo Burning: An Eyewitness Narrative from Pearl Harbor to Hiroshima" by Robert Guillain, a French journalist who spent the war as a internee in Japan and could see how the perception of war changed throughout the conflict period.

Cheers - Art

pogobbler
10-21-2010, 01:23 PM
Thanks for the suggestions so far. I meant to specify this, but, for the record, in this case, I'm most interested in accounts of the overall war, not just related to the aviation side of it... though those books do look interesting and I may end up with one, anyway. The person I'm getting them for doesn't have as much an interest in the aviation, specifically.

Saburo_0
10-24-2010, 03:28 PM
http://www.usni.org/store/books/aviation/samurai
I have this version of Samurai. I do not believe it has the Caiden night attack story. Being from the Naval Institute Press I suspect it is a corrected version. Sakai is listed as the author NOT Caiden.

I also 2nd Japan at War and Oral History if you want to understand Japanese thinking at the time.

horseback
10-25-2010, 08:39 AM
For the big picture stuff, I found that John Toland's Rising Sun is hard to beat. Toland was able to personally interview many of the participants in Japanese, and seemed to have a better grasp of Japanese culture and how things actually worked then & there, as opposed to how most people assume it 'must' have worked from a Western perspective.

Another one you might look for is I-Boat Captain (lost it when I got out of the Navy, so I can't cite the author); there was a rather revealing episode about the boat surfacing at night so that the crew, desperate for fresh air and to bathe in the sea water, could get a short break only to suddenly be bracketed by 5 inch shells fired by a US destroyer. The author seemed to feel that it was unfair of the Americans to use radar to target him in the dark...

cheers

horseback