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NIMITZ1967
09-30-2007, 04:56 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/typing.gifFellow site Dwellers

Other users on this fine site have made the call for some sort of inclusion of PT Boats. Ill go one further than that to say that it would be FANTASTIC http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif to run a Hunter style game performing the type of missions that these craft did, and working our way through the PACIFIC campaign in much the same manner. I think the simulation would actually be run over other existing game engine in SILENT HUNTER 4( The T.D.C. is one tool they both share, and they fire the same torpedoes and use same Deck Armament etc). Fantasizing I may be, but I'm not a programmer, I'm a humble history amateur http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif looking for a new thrill from my favorite military simulation of all time.....SILENT HUNTER 4...........But enough of these dream-like notions. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sleepzzz.gif ...........On with the Show.................. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif



MOTOR-TORPEDO CRAFT in World War II- The War In The Shallow Seas.


The bitterest naval encounters of the Second World War were those of the "little ships", the highly maneuverable motor torpedo boats. Small enough to slip unseen over moonlit waters, penetrating minefields and coastal defences to take the war to the enemy's home seas,and fast enough to fire their torpedoes
and speed away before enemy guns could be brought to bear. Deadly weapons in shallow waters. Too small and numerous to be given the dignity of names, they were known by numbers- to the British as MTBs and MGBs, to the Americans as PT boats, to the Germans as S boats and Italians as MAS boats. They saw action in every major theater of the war: in the English Channel and North Sea, among the dreamy isles of the Aegean and along the coasts of Italy and N.Africa, in Burma, Malaya, in the South china Sea, and across the Pacific to the final liberation of the Philippines.



Night was the time of their hunting. By day, because weight had to be sacrificed for speed, they were vulnerable. Rapid maneuvrability, a low silhouette and smokescreens were their primary means of protection. Guns were mounted, but these could only really be effective against craft of their own size. At rest the boats were squat and ugly, But at speed, they were things of beauty, planing over the water at 40 knots or more, with bows lifted, slicing great wakes from either side of their hulls and leaving foaming wakes far behind. Battles were fought at closer quarters, and at higher speeds than any other type of naval action.


Their stated purpose was to strike at shipping, but they were used in numerous other ways. Apart from escorting their own coastal merchant ships, they took part in combined operations raids, transporting troops and giving covering fire. They raided harbors, dropped agents, board and captured enemy merchants in a manner more like buccaneers. They Acted as naval scouts, seeking enemy ships and hidden bases. they rescued downed pilots from the waves and attacked submarines. They laid mines in shallow waters and swept safe lanes along friendly coasts. Their only limitations were range (due to high fuel consumption) and their inability to take punishment in heavy seas.



In three main areas of the conflict,the motor torpedo boat played a significant role; and in broad terms, their operations reached a peak at three distinct stages of the war. First was the fight for dominance in the "narrow seas" off the east and south coasts of the United Kingdom which, with Germany's occupation of the coastline of West Europe, was as grim and desperate as the great air battle raging overhead. This was their greatest theater of operations. Not only were motor boats of Britain and Germany used for attacking each others' merchant convoys by mine and torpedo. but this was a continual "direct" confrontation as they strove to defend as well as attack at the same time. Here, the boats were in their element, weaving among the mines and shallows where the subs and capital ships feared to go. Included amongst the Coastal forces of Britain were crews and boats from the Dominion and European allies and, at a later date from the United States. It was not until early 1943 that the allies began to reach equality (in terms of quantity and quality) with the OKM Schnellboote, perhaps the most successful of all the motor torpedo designs. The fight grew in intensity in 1943 as the allies carried the battle to enemy waters and again in 1944 with D-DAY; it continued to the very end of the war when German boats, although greatly outnumbered, were still harrying allied coastal shipping.



The second area of conflict was the Mediterranean, where naval war followed the progress of the land battles as they extended from N.Africa to Sicily, Italy and the Balkans. Here also the small ships attacked as well as defended convoys, as both sides fought to keep open lines of supply to land forces. Malta figured prominently in this bitter struggle, both as a base for the allied MTBs and as a target for MAS and S Boats. but the whole canvas of the Mediterranean was on a larger scale and gave greater scope for the lone role that suited the individualistic temperament of those that served in small boats. Either singularly or in small formations the craft would set out from their bases for days at a time to strike at enemy convoys, take part in commando raids, or co-operate with partisans or agents behind enemy lines by night and hiding amongst the numerous islands by day, sheltering in quiet bays and inlets., As in English home waters, Coastal Forces included Dominion and American crews and boats. for awhile, an American PT squadron was the sole representative of the U.S. Navy in these waters. In the early stages, the large numbers of Italian boats dominated the sea lanes. Italy had given more attention to the military application of such craft before the war than had other powers, which tended to concentrate on the development of big ships to the neglect of smaller ones. In early 1943, after a passage through the inland French waterways, German S boats reached the "warm sea" . For the next two years, these would contest Allied control of the Mediterranean.



The third and last area to come into prominence was the Pacific and Far East. Although British coastal forces were employed to a limited extent off the coasts of Malaya and Burma, this was primarily an American theater of operations in which the use of PT boats during the island hopping strategy to liberate Japanese occupied territories was ,perhaps, the most successful and spectacular of all. As well as being utilized to strike coastal shipping routes, the PTs took part in some of the great "fleet" battles of the Pacific War, and proved effective against IJN warships up to the size of a heavy cruiser. In the initial stages of the war, trapped by the rapid Japanese advance, the British MTBs and American PT boats were sunk by air attack or scuttled by crews. But with determination and skill, the surviving crew members formed a core for the final victory. The Japanese did less than any of the other major powers in their development of motor torpedo boats. Their sole contribution to the progress of small unit operations was the SHINYO(suicide craft). 16 to 18 feet in length and armed with a charge of 4000 pounds of explosive in their bows.


And, of course, there were other areas were small craft kept up the watchful work of patrolling and seldom, if ever, came into contact with the enemy. Areas such as the Caribbean, off the U.S. coast, in the Aleutians, in the frigid Baltic and off the shores of western and south Africa. In all these regions, and more, these craft operated, the most common of all vessels of war, armed and dangerous.



Motor torpedo boats of all major powers depended greatly on the development by private companies of motor boats for sport and leisure.

Gentlemen such as Sir Malcolm Campell and Henry Segrave, with their record breaking achievements over water, provided valuable knowledge for research into speed-boat design. Because most of the major navies of the world had paid so little attention to the possibilities of motor boats, even though they had been used dramatically and successfully during the First World War( especially the http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif Italians off Austria's coast), there had been much interchange of ideas between nations which were to find themselves on opposing sides in the coming conflict. Too the smaller countries, unable to afford large ships of war and unable to contest deep sea commerce lanes, were eager to explore the potential of coastal craft. Thus, firms like Vosper, Elco and Thornycraft built motor launches for many foreign navies. And so, at the beginning of the war, the few British MTBs that were in service were powered by fine Italian Isotta Fraschini engines-which immediately became unavailable: the German SCHNELLBOOTE was based on the American design of a motor launch built privately by Lurssen yard for an American sportsman. Thornycraft boats built for the Yugoslavian Navy were captured by the Italians and used by them against the allies: An MTB design by the British Power Boat Company was used as the basis for the first American PT boat: the American Packard engine was to be the main power unit for all British boats: a Thornycraft design was sold to Japan to become the basis for most of the boats built for the Imperial Navy.



There were similarities too, in the manning of the small craft. Most of the crews, officers and ratings alike, were civilian volunteers, often from pre-war yachtsmen and power boat enthusiasts. To a great extent they were regarded with skepticism by those of the regular navies. this attitude was modified after the small boats had proven their worth: but the tactics involved in fighting such craft had to be developed by the volunteers themselves through operational trial and error. The similarities in temperament between these men and the airmen of the First World War are striking. Daring, individualistic, quick-witted with quicker reflexes: honorable and with great respect for their opponents who fought in similar craft, they had often known the enemy personally, from international competition and correspondence before the war. These sailors fought a war apart. the small boats and small crews were, despite their differences, an elite brotherhood-and viewed themselves as such.



Diverse as they were, what all small operations proved-and this has been true of every war this century-is the vital importance of coastal waters. It is not solely through such waters EVERY merchant ship must pass, but often the coastal convoys are the only practical manner of transferring materials from one part of the country to the other. These ships must be protected, while equally there is a vital need to attack those of the enemy. Equally, from the military point of view, dominance of coastal waters are a crucial factor in mounting any expedition raid or invasion. this applies to defending as well as an assault, whenever it involves the transportation of a large body of troops by sea. Thus the domination of sea space is as vital to modern strategy as the domination of its airspace .(Do I hear the Ghost of Alfred Thayer Mahan cheering at this point? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif ......NIM)



It is impossible to assess accurately the results achieved by motor torpedo boats or their contribution to the course of the Second World War http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif . For one thing, actions invariably took place at night, when visibility was poor, and were fought at such high speeds that it was often difficult for the crews involved to know exactly what had happened. Claims were made in all good faith that could not later be confirmed by enemy records. Many an MTB, or PT boat or Schnellboote came limping back to base, hours or days overdue, after having been claimed as sunk by the opposition. Such craft showed a remarkable ability to survive even after heavy damage. Nor where the After Action Reports reliable guides to the losses of enemy merchants: Even from these, an inaccurate, incomplete picture develops. Many of the vessels sunk by MTBs in the Mediterranean, for instance, were caiques and fishing craft used by the Axis for a variety of purposes and too small to be included in the lists of merchant shipping losses. With the exception of major warship losses, such as cruisers and destroyers of which there can be no doubt, no such figures can be regarded as entirely accurate. when it comes to the losses of minor warships of 100 tons or less ( such as motor torpedo boats), and small merchant ships, and barges or tugs, it is often impossible for the researcher to verify what caused the destruction.


Although American PT boats played an important role in the Pacific, they were seldom directly opposed by similar craft and there is little basis for comparison here between the performance of these boats and the American and Japanese navies. It is in the http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif North Sea, English channel and Mediterranean http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif that the major confrontations took place between craft designed for the specific purpose of torpedo attack- the British MTBs and German S boats-and it is on the record of their performance that the most realistic assessment can be made.



The strength of the British Commonwealth and Coastal forces at the END of the war total 1383 craft. Losses during the war total http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif 222 boats- 115 MTBs, 28 MGBs, 79 MLs and HDMLs. Confirmed German and Italian warship losses credited to MTBs total 70 ships of 34554 tons, including one cruiser, 5 mine layers, one armed merchant raider and one submarine; of the remainder most were German "S" and "R" boats. Merchant shipping sunk by Coastal Forces in Home waters total 40 ships of 59650 tons, and in the Mediterranean some 100 vessels of approx. 70,000 tons.


Including those built before the war, Germany brought into operational service 244 "S" boats and 326 "R" boats. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif Losses total 146 "S" boats and 163 "R" boats.( of the 41 MAS boats seized by Germany after Italy's surrender, 24 were destroyed: of the remaining 103 Italian MAS boats commissioned, http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif 50 were destroyed in combat, 20 were scuttled and the rest fell into Allied hands.) British warships lost and credited to "S" boats total some 40 ships of approx. 25,000 tons including two cruisers and seven destroyers; Allied merchant ship losses to small boats total 99 ships of 229676 tons.



What emerges is that the German boats were, overall, more successful against Allied shipping than the MTBs, whilst the MTBs achieved a greater degree of success against their enemy opposite numbers. But this should be viewed against the number of targets available to each side. British coastal convoys usually comprised 40 ships (average), up to ten miles in length, and escorted by no more than two destroyers and a few MLs. The German convoys, on the other hand, usually had no more than half a dozen merchants, heavily escorted. Had the situation and strategy been reversed, the totals would have been reversed.


Amassed against the records of the war at sea as a whole, motor torpedo boats played a relatively minor role http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif . For example, the direct successes by torpedo attack of the German "S" boats accounted for only 1.1% of the total Allied merchant ship losses of 21,570,720 tons (as against 68.1% by submarines). But the story does not end there. It was as the Allies increasingly turned to a policy of amphibious warfare by combined operations that the small boats became increasingly into their own http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif , when command of enemy coastal waters became important-indeed as vital as the defence of those at home. Such raids as that on St.Nazaire were not only strategically successful in their own right, they led directly to tactics employed in the larger invasions of North Africa, Sicily, the Pacific Islands, Italy and finally to the greatest of all, Normandy.



After the war, the small boats suffered much the same fate as they had in 1918. These boats that had given such hard service were broken up or sold, some to take up new privateering careers as gun-runners or smugglers, others to end in a more gentle manner as pleasure craft, where only the ex-volunteer on holiday might chance upon one suddenly and wistfully recognize her for what she had been. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif For now, only memories remain of the laughter and the grimness, the triumph and tragedy of the war in the shallow seas.



AFTER ACTION CAPSULES http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif

STRAITS OF DOVER: On the night of 9 May 1940, 4 boats of Kapitanleuntnant Rudolph Petersons's 2nd Scnellboote Flotilla -were in position in the English Channel-the first German patrol in Home waters-to lend naval support to the invasion of Holland, Belgium and France. at 2200 hrs silhouettes were sighted on the horizon. As German shipping had been cleared from the area, Peterson ordered his force into attack. the enemy ships proved to be British Destoyers. In the ensuing , brief melee, HMS KELLY was torpedoed (Mountbatten's ship....that is H.M.the Queens COUSIN....the Brit Royal family FIGHT. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif ....NIM), sustaining severe damage. Thus began the long battle for control of the English Channel.
BLANC NEZ:
After months of frustration, Dover Command received reports of a German convoy running the straits on 8 September '41. Only 3 boats of the polygot 6th MTB Flotilla-composed of Canadians, Brits, Australian, Scots, South Africans Irish and Norwegians-were operational. But Lt.Commander Pumphrey, did not hesitate to order them out to intercept. At 2342 hrs, the British engaged the enemy screen. Drawn by the gunfire, two boats of the 3rd MGB Flotilla soon entered the battle. This action resulted in an encouraging British victory, the sinking of both German merchants and two "S" boats for the loss of one British boat. German ascendancy in the channel had finally been curbed. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif
BJOKKA FJIORD:
During the Autumn of 1941, the Royal Navy made the decision to carry the war into German controlled waters. On 1 October, the Norwegian DD DRAUG left the Scapa anchorage with MTB 56 in tow. Thirty miles from the Norwegian coast the small boat slipped from the destroyer and quietly entered the fijord south of Bergen. Here, the MTB came upon a fully laden tanker, escorted and northward bound. The British boat sank the tanker by torpedo, and one S boat by gunfire, then sped away to r/v with DRAUG for the return journey across the North sea. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif
BINANGA BAY:
At the beginning of the Pacific war, only 6 boats were available for the coming four month struggle-six boats of PT Sqaudron. 3, under the command of Lt John Bulkeley. Despite the hopeless situation, these PTs harassed Japanese naval movements at every opportunity. On 18 January, Bulkeley received orders to make a night attack on four ships, possibly including a DD that had been sighted. Selecting two boats which seemed to be in the best condition, he intercepted three merchantmen- escorted by a fleet DD- shortly after midnight. Attacking, a Japanese 5000ton merchant was sunk before American boats were forced to flee the gunfire from OTASHUSHU. Their party was dampened, however, when PT 31 was lost on a reef http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif during the return voyage!
CRETE:
Fighting was nowhere more bitter for these boats than in the Mediterranean, where control of sea-lanes was vital to both sides.No suprise that early successes for small craft were carried out by the Italians http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif . The Emphasis on individual effort rather than teamwork, which the handling of these boats required seemed particularly suited to the Italian temperament.Perhaps the most brilliant of the Italian motor torpedo boat http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif victories occurred on March 12th, when four MAS boats put four torpedoes into the Cruiser HMS YORK http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif , which was on patrol of Crete.
BAIE DE SEINE:
In the summer of 1942, a new generation of coastal craft and small boat tactics were introduced by the British in an attempt to wrest control of channel water from OKM. On 18 June, 3 British boats under the command of Lt.J.D.Ritchie set out with the Desrtoyer ALBRIGHTON to intercept two German merchant known to have departed Le Havre with s boat escort. Shortly after 0230 the following morning, ALBRIGHTON made RDF contact with the force and led the 2 MGBs into attack. The first co-ordinated DD-motor boat operation of the war was a moderate success: the sinking of a 3000ton German merchant, for the loss of MGB 7. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif
CAP DE LA HAGUE:
In the fall of 1942, the British Admiralty finally had the ships and boats available to base a strong force of MTBs, MGBs and HUNT class destroyers at Dartmouth, Plymouth and Portsmouth, in an attempt to close the channel entirely to German shipping. Over the next two years they carried out many sorties amongst the Channel islands and between Cherbourg and Ushant. One such op took place at night, 13 October 1942, when the Germans tried to bring the armed merchant raider KORNET through the channel to Cherbourg, from which she could strike Atlantic convoys. While most of the attacking forces failed to intercept the KORNET and her escort, two DDs made contact in the early hours of the day and succeeded in damaging-but not stopping- the merchant-raider., Engaged heavily by S boats, the DDs were unable to halt her escape. But at that moment, MTB 236 slipped into the fray and ,firing at a range of 500 yards, delivered the coup-de-grace with two torpedoes! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif
SKAJAERGAARD FJIORD:
To raid the shipping lanes across the coast of Norway,, the 30th MTB flotilla equipped with the new Fairmile "D" craft, and manned by Officers and men of the Royal Norwegian Navy, under the command of Lt R.A Tamber, was formed in OCT 42' and based in the Shetlands. Their first success came in the early morning of 27 NOV. In spite of a brilliant full moon, two of the boats managed to penetrate the fjiord, avoiding patrolling S boats, and torpedoed two large merchant ships anchored there, before returning home unscathed through a full Atlantic gale. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif
KUMISI RIVER:
The first PT boats arrived in the SW Pacific theater mid DEC 1942. There were only six boats, formed into "Division 17", commanded by Lt.Daniel S.Baughman. The first victory of these few boats in the desperate warfare around New Guinea was dramatic. On the night of Christmas Eve, while on patrol from advance base at Tufi, Baughman in PT 122 sighted a submarine off the mouth of the Kumisi River. Beyond it was a dark object that proved to be another Japanese sub. the rapid American attack by two boats sank the I-22 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif and avoided the return fire from the other sub, to speed away to safety.
TRIPOLI HARBOR:
Early in 1943, the MTBs based at Malta achieved their 1st major success. Four boats left the island at midday 19JAN on patrol towards Tripoli. approaching the harbor at 10 knots on silent engines, the 3 boats which made landfall chanced upon an Italian sub, the SANTORRE SANTOROSA, which was actually grounded on shoals a mile outside the harbor. Engaged by cannon fire from the sub,the MTBs maneuvered to place their torpedoes, but were driven off by a German DD that emerged from the harbor. however, after a few minutes, the small boats returned to the attack and at 0220 were rewarded for their tenacity when a torpedo from MTB 220 struck the sub aft of the conning tower.. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif The boats quickly broke off their action with the DD and all 3 arrived at Malta in the dawn light of 20 Jan.
RAS EL-MIRH:
In April 43', the first boats of the U.S. PT Squadron 15 ,commanded by Lt. Commander
Stanley Barnes arrived at the British base of Bone'. Until the Sicily landings in July, this squadron of 12 boats was the only representative of the U.S. Navy in offensive action in the Med. On 8 May, the PTs, patrolling with experienced MTB commanders, scored their first success when PT 206 sank an Italian freighter and evaded the escorting S boats. MTB 61 ran aground http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif 300 yards from shore during the action, and as the shore guns opened fire from the fort at Keliba, MTB 61 was scuttled, and her crew picked up.
STRAITS OF MESSINA:
With the invasion of Sicily (operation HUSKEY), it now became vital for the allies to control the Messina strait, to prevent resupply and reinforcement, or later, evacuation of survivors to the mainland . This task fell to British MTBs, based at Malta, then later, Syracuse. On 14 July 1943, 3 boats of the 24th Flotilla from Malta were lying in mid-channel with engines off, when 2 surfaced U-boats suddenly bore down on them. A torpedo, fired from a range of 100 yards, sank the hapless U-561, but the other sub crash-dived. As the MTBs searched for survivors, a group of S boats passed by at high speed. The British gave chase, radioing ahead to the southern patrol, comprised of MTBs 655, 656, and633. Upon receipt of the message from MTB 77 to intercept the S boats, these 3 engaged the German craft at 2340hrs-an hour and a half after the sinking of U561. Shortly after, 7 MAS boats and the Northern Brit patrol arrive. What followed was the largest "dog-fight' of the war in the shallows, as further reinforcements arrived over the next few hours. Despite the shells expended, the battle was inconclusive: 2 S boats lost, the rest retiring to the mainland. The MAS boats , using their superior speed, fled north. Even with damage and casualties on several boats the allied craft all returned to port. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

NIMITZ1967
09-30-2007, 04:56 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/typing.gifFellow site Dwellers

Other users on this fine site have made the call for some sort of inclusion of PT Boats. Ill go one further than that to say that it would be FANTASTIC http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif to run a Hunter style game performing the type of missions that these craft did, and working our way through the PACIFIC campaign in much the same manner. I think the simulation would actually be run over other existing game engine in SILENT HUNTER 4( The T.D.C. is one tool they both share, and they fire the same torpedoes and use same Deck Armament etc). Fantasizing I may be, but I'm not a programmer, I'm a humble history amateur http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif looking for a new thrill from my favorite military simulation of all time.....SILENT HUNTER 4...........But enough of these dream-like notions. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sleepzzz.gif ...........On with the Show.................. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif



MOTOR-TORPEDO CRAFT in World War II- The War In The Shallow Seas.


The bitterest naval encounters of the Second World War were those of the "little ships", the highly maneuverable motor torpedo boats. Small enough to slip unseen over moonlit waters, penetrating minefields and coastal defences to take the war to the enemy's home seas,and fast enough to fire their torpedoes
and speed away before enemy guns could be brought to bear. Deadly weapons in shallow waters. Too small and numerous to be given the dignity of names, they were known by numbers- to the British as MTBs and MGBs, to the Americans as PT boats, to the Germans as S boats and Italians as MAS boats. They saw action in every major theater of the war: in the English Channel and North Sea, among the dreamy isles of the Aegean and along the coasts of Italy and N.Africa, in Burma, Malaya, in the South china Sea, and across the Pacific to the final liberation of the Philippines.



Night was the time of their hunting. By day, because weight had to be sacrificed for speed, they were vulnerable. Rapid maneuvrability, a low silhouette and smokescreens were their primary means of protection. Guns were mounted, but these could only really be effective against craft of their own size. At rest the boats were squat and ugly, But at speed, they were things of beauty, planing over the water at 40 knots or more, with bows lifted, slicing great wakes from either side of their hulls and leaving foaming wakes far behind. Battles were fought at closer quarters, and at higher speeds than any other type of naval action.


Their stated purpose was to strike at shipping, but they were used in numerous other ways. Apart from escorting their own coastal merchant ships, they took part in combined operations raids, transporting troops and giving covering fire. They raided harbors, dropped agents, board and captured enemy merchants in a manner more like buccaneers. They Acted as naval scouts, seeking enemy ships and hidden bases. they rescued downed pilots from the waves and attacked submarines. They laid mines in shallow waters and swept safe lanes along friendly coasts. Their only limitations were range (due to high fuel consumption) and their inability to take punishment in heavy seas.



In three main areas of the conflict,the motor torpedo boat played a significant role; and in broad terms, their operations reached a peak at three distinct stages of the war. First was the fight for dominance in the "narrow seas" off the east and south coasts of the United Kingdom which, with Germany's occupation of the coastline of West Europe, was as grim and desperate as the great air battle raging overhead. This was their greatest theater of operations. Not only were motor boats of Britain and Germany used for attacking each others' merchant convoys by mine and torpedo. but this was a continual "direct" confrontation as they strove to defend as well as attack at the same time. Here, the boats were in their element, weaving among the mines and shallows where the subs and capital ships feared to go. Included amongst the Coastal forces of Britain were crews and boats from the Dominion and European allies and, at a later date from the United States. It was not until early 1943 that the allies began to reach equality (in terms of quantity and quality) with the OKM Schnellboote, perhaps the most successful of all the motor torpedo designs. The fight grew in intensity in 1943 as the allies carried the battle to enemy waters and again in 1944 with D-DAY; it continued to the very end of the war when German boats, although greatly outnumbered, were still harrying allied coastal shipping.



The second area of conflict was the Mediterranean, where naval war followed the progress of the land battles as they extended from N.Africa to Sicily, Italy and the Balkans. Here also the small ships attacked as well as defended convoys, as both sides fought to keep open lines of supply to land forces. Malta figured prominently in this bitter struggle, both as a base for the allied MTBs and as a target for MAS and S Boats. but the whole canvas of the Mediterranean was on a larger scale and gave greater scope for the lone role that suited the individualistic temperament of those that served in small boats. Either singularly or in small formations the craft would set out from their bases for days at a time to strike at enemy convoys, take part in commando raids, or co-operate with partisans or agents behind enemy lines by night and hiding amongst the numerous islands by day, sheltering in quiet bays and inlets., As in English home waters, Coastal Forces included Dominion and American crews and boats. for awhile, an American PT squadron was the sole representative of the U.S. Navy in these waters. In the early stages, the large numbers of Italian boats dominated the sea lanes. Italy had given more attention to the military application of such craft before the war than had other powers, which tended to concentrate on the development of big ships to the neglect of smaller ones. In early 1943, after a passage through the inland French waterways, German S boats reached the "warm sea" . For the next two years, these would contest Allied control of the Mediterranean.



The third and last area to come into prominence was the Pacific and Far East. Although British coastal forces were employed to a limited extent off the coasts of Malaya and Burma, this was primarily an American theater of operations in which the use of PT boats during the island hopping strategy to liberate Japanese occupied territories was ,perhaps, the most successful and spectacular of all. As well as being utilized to strike coastal shipping routes, the PTs took part in some of the great "fleet" battles of the Pacific War, and proved effective against IJN warships up to the size of a heavy cruiser. In the initial stages of the war, trapped by the rapid Japanese advance, the British MTBs and American PT boats were sunk by air attack or scuttled by crews. But with determination and skill, the surviving crew members formed a core for the final victory. The Japanese did less than any of the other major powers in their development of motor torpedo boats. Their sole contribution to the progress of small unit operations was the SHINYO(suicide craft). 16 to 18 feet in length and armed with a charge of 4000 pounds of explosive in their bows.


And, of course, there were other areas were small craft kept up the watchful work of patrolling and seldom, if ever, came into contact with the enemy. Areas such as the Caribbean, off the U.S. coast, in the Aleutians, in the frigid Baltic and off the shores of western and south Africa. In all these regions, and more, these craft operated, the most common of all vessels of war, armed and dangerous.



Motor torpedo boats of all major powers depended greatly on the development by private companies of motor boats for sport and leisure.

Gentlemen such as Sir Malcolm Campell and Henry Segrave, with their record breaking achievements over water, provided valuable knowledge for research into speed-boat design. Because most of the major navies of the world had paid so little attention to the possibilities of motor boats, even though they had been used dramatically and successfully during the First World War( especially the http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif Italians off Austria's coast), there had been much interchange of ideas between nations which were to find themselves on opposing sides in the coming conflict. Too the smaller countries, unable to afford large ships of war and unable to contest deep sea commerce lanes, were eager to explore the potential of coastal craft. Thus, firms like Vosper, Elco and Thornycraft built motor launches for many foreign navies. And so, at the beginning of the war, the few British MTBs that were in service were powered by fine Italian Isotta Fraschini engines-which immediately became unavailable: the German SCHNELLBOOTE was based on the American design of a motor launch built privately by Lurssen yard for an American sportsman. Thornycraft boats built for the Yugoslavian Navy were captured by the Italians and used by them against the allies: An MTB design by the British Power Boat Company was used as the basis for the first American PT boat: the American Packard engine was to be the main power unit for all British boats: a Thornycraft design was sold to Japan to become the basis for most of the boats built for the Imperial Navy.



There were similarities too, in the manning of the small craft. Most of the crews, officers and ratings alike, were civilian volunteers, often from pre-war yachtsmen and power boat enthusiasts. To a great extent they were regarded with skepticism by those of the regular navies. this attitude was modified after the small boats had proven their worth: but the tactics involved in fighting such craft had to be developed by the volunteers themselves through operational trial and error. The similarities in temperament between these men and the airmen of the First World War are striking. Daring, individualistic, quick-witted with quicker reflexes: honorable and with great respect for their opponents who fought in similar craft, they had often known the enemy personally, from international competition and correspondence before the war. These sailors fought a war apart. the small boats and small crews were, despite their differences, an elite brotherhood-and viewed themselves as such.



Diverse as they were, what all small operations proved-and this has been true of every war this century-is the vital importance of coastal waters. It is not solely through such waters EVERY merchant ship must pass, but often the coastal convoys are the only practical manner of transferring materials from one part of the country to the other. These ships must be protected, while equally there is a vital need to attack those of the enemy. Equally, from the military point of view, dominance of coastal waters are a crucial factor in mounting any expedition raid or invasion. this applies to defending as well as an assault, whenever it involves the transportation of a large body of troops by sea. Thus the domination of sea space is as vital to modern strategy as the domination of its airspace .(Do I hear the Ghost of Alfred Thayer Mahan cheering at this point? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif ......NIM)



It is impossible to assess accurately the results achieved by motor torpedo boats or their contribution to the course of the Second World War http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif . For one thing, actions invariably took place at night, when visibility was poor, and were fought at such high speeds that it was often difficult for the crews involved to know exactly what had happened. Claims were made in all good faith that could not later be confirmed by enemy records. Many an MTB, or PT boat or Schnellboote came limping back to base, hours or days overdue, after having been claimed as sunk by the opposition. Such craft showed a remarkable ability to survive even after heavy damage. Nor where the After Action Reports reliable guides to the losses of enemy merchants: Even from these, an inaccurate, incomplete picture develops. Many of the vessels sunk by MTBs in the Mediterranean, for instance, were caiques and fishing craft used by the Axis for a variety of purposes and too small to be included in the lists of merchant shipping losses. With the exception of major warship losses, such as cruisers and destroyers of which there can be no doubt, no such figures can be regarded as entirely accurate. when it comes to the losses of minor warships of 100 tons or less ( such as motor torpedo boats), and small merchant ships, and barges or tugs, it is often impossible for the researcher to verify what caused the destruction.


Although American PT boats played an important role in the Pacific, they were seldom directly opposed by similar craft and there is little basis for comparison here between the performance of these boats and the American and Japanese navies. It is in the http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif North Sea, English channel and Mediterranean http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif that the major confrontations took place between craft designed for the specific purpose of torpedo attack- the British MTBs and German S boats-and it is on the record of their performance that the most realistic assessment can be made.



The strength of the British Commonwealth and Coastal forces at the END of the war total 1383 craft. Losses during the war total http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif 222 boats- 115 MTBs, 28 MGBs, 79 MLs and HDMLs. Confirmed German and Italian warship losses credited to MTBs total 70 ships of 34554 tons, including one cruiser, 5 mine layers, one armed merchant raider and one submarine; of the remainder most were German "S" and "R" boats. Merchant shipping sunk by Coastal Forces in Home waters total 40 ships of 59650 tons, and in the Mediterranean some 100 vessels of approx. 70,000 tons.


Including those built before the war, Germany brought into operational service 244 "S" boats and 326 "R" boats. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif Losses total 146 "S" boats and 163 "R" boats.( of the 41 MAS boats seized by Germany after Italy's surrender, 24 were destroyed: of the remaining 103 Italian MAS boats commissioned, http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif 50 were destroyed in combat, 20 were scuttled and the rest fell into Allied hands.) British warships lost and credited to "S" boats total some 40 ships of approx. 25,000 tons including two cruisers and seven destroyers; Allied merchant ship losses to small boats total 99 ships of 229676 tons.



What emerges is that the German boats were, overall, more successful against Allied shipping than the MTBs, whilst the MTBs achieved a greater degree of success against their enemy opposite numbers. But this should be viewed against the number of targets available to each side. British coastal convoys usually comprised 40 ships (average), up to ten miles in length, and escorted by no more than two destroyers and a few MLs. The German convoys, on the other hand, usually had no more than half a dozen merchants, heavily escorted. Had the situation and strategy been reversed, the totals would have been reversed.


Amassed against the records of the war at sea as a whole, motor torpedo boats played a relatively minor role http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif . For example, the direct successes by torpedo attack of the German "S" boats accounted for only 1.1% of the total Allied merchant ship losses of 21,570,720 tons (as against 68.1% by submarines). But the story does not end there. It was as the Allies increasingly turned to a policy of amphibious warfare by combined operations that the small boats became increasingly into their own http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif , when command of enemy coastal waters became important-indeed as vital as the defence of those at home. Such raids as that on St.Nazaire were not only strategically successful in their own right, they led directly to tactics employed in the larger invasions of North Africa, Sicily, the Pacific Islands, Italy and finally to the greatest of all, Normandy.



After the war, the small boats suffered much the same fate as they had in 1918. These boats that had given such hard service were broken up or sold, some to take up new privateering careers as gun-runners or smugglers, others to end in a more gentle manner as pleasure craft, where only the ex-volunteer on holiday might chance upon one suddenly and wistfully recognize her for what she had been. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif For now, only memories remain of the laughter and the grimness, the triumph and tragedy of the war in the shallow seas.



AFTER ACTION CAPSULES http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif

STRAITS OF DOVER: On the night of 9 May 1940, 4 boats of Kapitanleuntnant Rudolph Petersons's 2nd Scnellboote Flotilla -were in position in the English Channel-the first German patrol in Home waters-to lend naval support to the invasion of Holland, Belgium and France. at 2200 hrs silhouettes were sighted on the horizon. As German shipping had been cleared from the area, Peterson ordered his force into attack. the enemy ships proved to be British Destoyers. In the ensuing , brief melee, HMS KELLY was torpedoed (Mountbatten's ship....that is H.M.the Queens COUSIN....the Brit Royal family FIGHT. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif ....NIM), sustaining severe damage. Thus began the long battle for control of the English Channel.
BLANC NEZ:
After months of frustration, Dover Command received reports of a German convoy running the straits on 8 September '41. Only 3 boats of the polygot 6th MTB Flotilla-composed of Canadians, Brits, Australian, Scots, South Africans Irish and Norwegians-were operational. But Lt.Commander Pumphrey, did not hesitate to order them out to intercept. At 2342 hrs, the British engaged the enemy screen. Drawn by the gunfire, two boats of the 3rd MGB Flotilla soon entered the battle. This action resulted in an encouraging British victory, the sinking of both German merchants and two "S" boats for the loss of one British boat. German ascendancy in the channel had finally been curbed. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif
BJOKKA FJIORD:
During the Autumn of 1941, the Royal Navy made the decision to carry the war into German controlled waters. On 1 October, the Norwegian DD DRAUG left the Scapa anchorage with MTB 56 in tow. Thirty miles from the Norwegian coast the small boat slipped from the destroyer and quietly entered the fijord south of Bergen. Here, the MTB came upon a fully laden tanker, escorted and northward bound. The British boat sank the tanker by torpedo, and one S boat by gunfire, then sped away to r/v with DRAUG for the return journey across the North sea. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif
BINANGA BAY:
At the beginning of the Pacific war, only 6 boats were available for the coming four month struggle-six boats of PT Sqaudron. 3, under the command of Lt John Bulkeley. Despite the hopeless situation, these PTs harassed Japanese naval movements at every opportunity. On 18 January, Bulkeley received orders to make a night attack on four ships, possibly including a DD that had been sighted. Selecting two boats which seemed to be in the best condition, he intercepted three merchantmen- escorted by a fleet DD- shortly after midnight. Attacking, a Japanese 5000ton merchant was sunk before American boats were forced to flee the gunfire from OTASHUSHU. Their party was dampened, however, when PT 31 was lost on a reef http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif during the return voyage!
CRETE:
Fighting was nowhere more bitter for these boats than in the Mediterranean, where control of sea-lanes was vital to both sides.No suprise that early successes for small craft were carried out by the Italians http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif . The Emphasis on individual effort rather than teamwork, which the handling of these boats required seemed particularly suited to the Italian temperament.Perhaps the most brilliant of the Italian motor torpedo boat http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif victories occurred on March 12th, when four MAS boats put four torpedoes into the Cruiser HMS YORK http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif , which was on patrol of Crete.
BAIE DE SEINE:
In the summer of 1942, a new generation of coastal craft and small boat tactics were introduced by the British in an attempt to wrest control of channel water from OKM. On 18 June, 3 British boats under the command of Lt.J.D.Ritchie set out with the Desrtoyer ALBRIGHTON to intercept two German merchant known to have departed Le Havre with s boat escort. Shortly after 0230 the following morning, ALBRIGHTON made RDF contact with the force and led the 2 MGBs into attack. The first co-ordinated DD-motor boat operation of the war was a moderate success: the sinking of a 3000ton German merchant, for the loss of MGB 7. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif
CAP DE LA HAGUE:
In the fall of 1942, the British Admiralty finally had the ships and boats available to base a strong force of MTBs, MGBs and HUNT class destroyers at Dartmouth, Plymouth and Portsmouth, in an attempt to close the channel entirely to German shipping. Over the next two years they carried out many sorties amongst the Channel islands and between Cherbourg and Ushant. One such op took place at night, 13 October 1942, when the Germans tried to bring the armed merchant raider KORNET through the channel to Cherbourg, from which she could strike Atlantic convoys. While most of the attacking forces failed to intercept the KORNET and her escort, two DDs made contact in the early hours of the day and succeeded in damaging-but not stopping- the merchant-raider., Engaged heavily by S boats, the DDs were unable to halt her escape. But at that moment, MTB 236 slipped into the fray and ,firing at a range of 500 yards, delivered the coup-de-grace with two torpedoes! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif
SKAJAERGAARD FJIORD:
To raid the shipping lanes across the coast of Norway,, the 30th MTB flotilla equipped with the new Fairmile "D" craft, and manned by Officers and men of the Royal Norwegian Navy, under the command of Lt R.A Tamber, was formed in OCT 42' and based in the Shetlands. Their first success came in the early morning of 27 NOV. In spite of a brilliant full moon, two of the boats managed to penetrate the fjiord, avoiding patrolling S boats, and torpedoed two large merchant ships anchored there, before returning home unscathed through a full Atlantic gale. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif
KUMISI RIVER:
The first PT boats arrived in the SW Pacific theater mid DEC 1942. There were only six boats, formed into "Division 17", commanded by Lt.Daniel S.Baughman. The first victory of these few boats in the desperate warfare around New Guinea was dramatic. On the night of Christmas Eve, while on patrol from advance base at Tufi, Baughman in PT 122 sighted a submarine off the mouth of the Kumisi River. Beyond it was a dark object that proved to be another Japanese sub. the rapid American attack by two boats sank the I-22 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif and avoided the return fire from the other sub, to speed away to safety.
TRIPOLI HARBOR:
Early in 1943, the MTBs based at Malta achieved their 1st major success. Four boats left the island at midday 19JAN on patrol towards Tripoli. approaching the harbor at 10 knots on silent engines, the 3 boats which made landfall chanced upon an Italian sub, the SANTORRE SANTOROSA, which was actually grounded on shoals a mile outside the harbor. Engaged by cannon fire from the sub,the MTBs maneuvered to place their torpedoes, but were driven off by a German DD that emerged from the harbor. however, after a few minutes, the small boats returned to the attack and at 0220 were rewarded for their tenacity when a torpedo from MTB 220 struck the sub aft of the conning tower.. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif The boats quickly broke off their action with the DD and all 3 arrived at Malta in the dawn light of 20 Jan.
RAS EL-MIRH:
In April 43', the first boats of the U.S. PT Squadron 15 ,commanded by Lt. Commander
Stanley Barnes arrived at the British base of Bone'. Until the Sicily landings in July, this squadron of 12 boats was the only representative of the U.S. Navy in offensive action in the Med. On 8 May, the PTs, patrolling with experienced MTB commanders, scored their first success when PT 206 sank an Italian freighter and evaded the escorting S boats. MTB 61 ran aground http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif 300 yards from shore during the action, and as the shore guns opened fire from the fort at Keliba, MTB 61 was scuttled, and her crew picked up.
STRAITS OF MESSINA:
With the invasion of Sicily (operation HUSKEY), it now became vital for the allies to control the Messina strait, to prevent resupply and reinforcement, or later, evacuation of survivors to the mainland . This task fell to British MTBs, based at Malta, then later, Syracuse. On 14 July 1943, 3 boats of the 24th Flotilla from Malta were lying in mid-channel with engines off, when 2 surfaced U-boats suddenly bore down on them. A torpedo, fired from a range of 100 yards, sank the hapless U-561, but the other sub crash-dived. As the MTBs searched for survivors, a group of S boats passed by at high speed. The British gave chase, radioing ahead to the southern patrol, comprised of MTBs 655, 656, and633. Upon receipt of the message from MTB 77 to intercept the S boats, these 3 engaged the German craft at 2340hrs-an hour and a half after the sinking of U561. Shortly after, 7 MAS boats and the Northern Brit patrol arrive. What followed was the largest "dog-fight' of the war in the shallows, as further reinforcements arrived over the next few hours. Despite the shells expended, the battle was inconclusive: 2 S boats lost, the rest retiring to the mainland. The MAS boats , using their superior speed, fled north. Even with damage and casualties on several boats the allied craft all returned to port. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

NIMITZ1967
09-30-2007, 05:51 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif This piece originally appeared in "The General" (Vol 23 no.3), and was written by none other than the editor of the mag at the time, "Tyrannosaurus" Rex Martin. He sent me a nice letter as a subscriber once. I hope he can see this....Thanks to all, keep the comments coming....tell me if you DIDN'T like that which i post....ALL comments WELCOME! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

NIMITZ1967
10-01-2007, 04:27 PM
Just like to mention that i've been looking for a decent game of any description on this topic; I've yet to find one!..........now theres a hidden message in there somewhere for a certain program development team....if not a full game, why not as a "scenario" or add on? Do i here the words "PT MOD" wafting in the breeze?.........aahhhh!!!!!....lets hope so! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sleepzzz.gif

NIMITZ1967
10-01-2007, 06:43 PM
uuummm......just one final little matter......please refrain from corny sentimentalist jokes vis-a-vis a certain network television show about PT Boats.....you know the one... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gifahem..

lane2512
10-01-2007, 06:52 PM
Aye, aye. Would'nt dream of it....
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s300/lane2512/mchale.jpg

NIMITZ1967
10-02-2007, 12:48 AM
Yep......THAT one....whose name CANNOT be uttered!

NIMITZ1967
10-02-2007, 01:40 AM
Perfect photo too.....i wear glasses!....very funny post...somebody ran with it...great....you guys just read my mind sometimes...i hate posting picks...don't know how, so when somebody responds in this sort of manner, its really great. Dont get me wrong, i used to laugh at Bingham too!

lane2512
10-02-2007, 07:14 AM
Glad you have a sense of humor Nimitz....too many beers last night http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Back on topic. Guadalcanal late 42....my pop said his unit made frequent 'forays' to the PT boats....seems they had two trade goods the Marines were in need of...bootlegged beer and the C02 fire extinguishers to chill the beer with! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

NIMITZ1967
10-02-2007, 08:14 AM
Sound like funeh?.......rumors of possible alck of sence of humor from yours truly greatly exaggerated.....i was simply "trawling for a bite, so that somebody would take the bait and post a pictur.....you came in beautifully!......Great reply, i wish more of you would reply in person....makes me feel like im doing this for some-one, rather than a faceless mass ....thanks for the bight!

NIMITZ1967
10-02-2007, 08:17 AM
hang on....CO2 cylinders to "chill beer with"?.. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif ...bet that doesnt make the general histories! lovely little anecdote....Ta muchAs!

NIMITZ1967
10-02-2007, 01:13 PM
very nice of you to provide that little "After Action Capsule" of your fathers.....lane 2512....have to remember your name!.....ta ol'mate! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

cpt-rusty
10-03-2007, 08:37 AM
where? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

klcarroll
10-03-2007, 12:19 PM
I have created a link to this thread in the SH3 forum; ....as there is much here that would be of interest to those guys!

klcarroll

klcarroll
10-03-2007, 12:59 PM
If you want to post your new pieces here, ...that's fine! .....I'll link them to the SH3 forum as appropriate.

klcarroll

NIMITZ1967
10-08-2007, 07:51 AM
Back online and working! Comments most welcome!

NIMITZ1967
10-08-2007, 02:29 PM
here....ONLY ON THE SITE THAT MAKES YOUR DAY.......SILENT HUNTER 4!

mllaneza
10-08-2007, 09:11 PM
For the computer games (all of us), there is a Really Pretty PT sim coming from a Russian publisher - it'll be all Baltic and Black Sea actions, but maybe a Pacific expansion is possible.

http://www.pt-boats.net/ (awful Flash-heavy site, best to Google for Knights of the Seas and look at the trailers and screenshots)

For the miniatures gamer (the few, the proud...) there's a couple of good sets of rules available; Flaklighter and Action Stations leap to mind. For miniatures, PT Dockyard makes lovely 1/600 scale boats, and Hallmark/Regal have some gorgeous little 1/1250 boats.

http://ptdockyard.tripod.com/
http://www.lastsquare.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=1_907_926_927_928
(British boats in 1/1250)
http://www.lastsquare.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPat...44&products_id=14024 (http://www.lastsquare.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=840_844&products_id=14024)
(Flaklighter rules)
http://www.aandagames.co.uk/action_stations.htm

and quite useful, the author of Action Stations has a handy page
http://www.btinternet.com/~david.manley/naval/Actionst/actionst.html (http://www.btinternet.com/%7Edavid.manley/naval/Actionst/actionst.html)

NIMITZ1967
10-09-2007, 01:20 AM
Now thats just dead set original....Veteran-Bermuda Triangle http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gifDefence Force....make sure you say a quick hello to Flight 19 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif at the next veterans re-union eh? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

NIMITZ1967
10-10-2007, 04:50 AM
Back online....commments most welcome!

NIMITZ1967
10-10-2007, 09:59 AM
comments welcome

NIMITZ1967
10-16-2007, 01:24 AM
Got another article based on motor torpedo boats in the works...look for it soon!

NIMITZ1967
10-17-2007, 07:09 AM
Interested readers can get a glimpse of more from a thread just posted about SLAPTON SANDS

NIMITZ1967
10-17-2007, 09:26 PM
Another thread for interested readers on the Tirpitz....here now....on the only site that brings this to your door....SILENT HUNTER 4

NIMITZ1967
10-21-2007, 06:25 PM
Well have to get one of you mods to put all these new ones on one thread

VikingGrandad
10-21-2007, 06:36 PM
NIMITZ!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

I don't know what you're trying to do with all these thread bumps! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

All you actually needed to do was ensure all your links are in your 'NIMITZ Consolidated Essays and Articles' thread (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/6421019045/m/4521048795) (which they now appear to be), and then post at the end of that thread to announce any updates etc. That way everyone can get to all your threads from ONE place.

If you do this multiple bumping again, I (or another moderator) will delete your bump posts, so that your threads are bumped back down again.

Flooding the first page of the forum by bumping all your threads at once isn't acceptable, because it pushes other people's threads off the front page! Does that make sense?

NIMITZ1967
10-21-2007, 09:56 PM
Viking....ive been offline for days....something went wrong with my wonderful vista computer

NIMITZ1967
10-21-2007, 09:57 PM
Now that im back online, could you please gather the threads together that are not on the consolodated thread do in can put the under a part II thread, as such

NIMITZ1967
10-21-2007, 09:58 PM
My rotten computer scared the absolute hell out of me.....

NIMITZ1967
10-21-2007, 10:00 PM
This exercise in bumping is merely a means to that end, with some gentle help from your good self....could you also tell me how to scan pictures to the various places.....a picture or two to go with each new piece....ive got an HP Printer/scanner.....it's hooked up as far as i can see....whay do i do next?

NIMITZ1967
10-21-2007, 10:04 PM
Also.....the threads that are already covered by the link at the bottom of my messages......the consolodated thread......do i wipe off the threads from the main forum page once a link has been established through my sig banner?...or...do they stay on the forum site?....im not quite sure what to do from here....a little advice would be very nice at this point http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif