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View Full Version : Rabaul Action/ KI-43,Ki-44,Ki-61 etc..!



VF-3Thunderboy
05-26-2005, 04:59 PM
http://yarchive.net/mil/rabaul_raids.html
Go to the homepage, there is too much to list!

The Rabaul raids were pretty rugged. On the four attacks between 2 Nov.
and 11 Nov. 20 B-24s (11 percent of the total number in the 5th Air
Force), 21 B-25s (8 percent of all those in the 5AF) and 38 P-38s (19
percent of all those in the 5AF) were lost.
Anti-aircraft fire was intense, and included that from naval vessels in
the harbor as well as AA situated on the sides of the volcanoes firing
*down* on the B-25s and their escorts. Weather was atrocious, and on one
of the missions the ceiling over the Rabual area was only 700 ft. Huge
thunderheads towered well over 40,000 ft. Into that narrow bit of sky the
B-25s, their P-38 escorts and the defending Japanese fighters plunged while
torrential rain squalls, violent down and up drafts, blinding flashes of
lightning, boiling clouds, and sudden shafts of sunlight played over the
action. Flak bursts were everywhere, the ships in the harbor and the guns
ashore flashed and winked continuously. Lines of tracers criss-crossed
again and again. The B-25s, right on the deck, poured out heavy exhaust
from the full-rich settings and burning engine oil. Once in a while, one
would break off streaming fire. The Japanese fighters swarmed everywhere,
looping and rolling.
Some of them would dive directly into the midst of a B-25 formation and
pull right up to a bomber and just park there, pouring gunfire into it
until it went down.......

VF-3Thunderboy
05-26-2005, 04:59 PM
http://yarchive.net/mil/rabaul_raids.html
Go to the homepage, there is too much to list!

The Rabaul raids were pretty rugged. On the four attacks between 2 Nov.
and 11 Nov. 20 B-24s (11 percent of the total number in the 5th Air
Force), 21 B-25s (8 percent of all those in the 5AF) and 38 P-38s (19
percent of all those in the 5AF) were lost.
Anti-aircraft fire was intense, and included that from naval vessels in
the harbor as well as AA situated on the sides of the volcanoes firing
*down* on the B-25s and their escorts. Weather was atrocious, and on one
of the missions the ceiling over the Rabual area was only 700 ft. Huge
thunderheads towered well over 40,000 ft. Into that narrow bit of sky the
B-25s, their P-38 escorts and the defending Japanese fighters plunged while
torrential rain squalls, violent down and up drafts, blinding flashes of
lightning, boiling clouds, and sudden shafts of sunlight played over the
action. Flak bursts were everywhere, the ships in the harbor and the guns
ashore flashed and winked continuously. Lines of tracers criss-crossed
again and again. The B-25s, right on the deck, poured out heavy exhaust
from the full-rich settings and burning engine oil. Once in a while, one
would break off streaming fire. The Japanese fighters swarmed everywhere,
looping and rolling.
Some of them would dive directly into the midst of a B-25 formation and
pull right up to a bomber and just park there, pouring gunfire into it
until it went down.......

VW-IceFire
05-26-2005, 05:13 PM
Amazing stuff....

I always wondered why we never got a Rabaul map!

Frequent_Flyer
05-26-2005, 09:20 PM
Lawyer's could't figure out who to send the check to.

LEXX_Luthor
05-27-2005, 05:03 PM
Same Author:: <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Then past the objective and the B-25s pulled up into the clouds. Fighters did, too, and it was blind flying through a violent thunderstorm full of other airplanes also flying blind. Turn for home, break into a vast cloud canyon at 25,000 ft. Canopy frosted over, ice on the wings, radio on the fritz, gyro compass spinning, left engine running hot, funny vibration coming from somewhere. A wall of thunderheads between you and home towering up at least another 25,000 ft. Above you, not another airplane in sight. Holes in your wing. Gas a little on the low side. Five-hundred miles to go for some Spam fried in axle grease and a cup of coffee brewed with battery acid....
Just another day at the office. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
This writer knows how clouds and combat aviation mix, or don't like to mix. Flight sim Developers should listen to this writer.