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freakvollder
10-04-2009, 08:51 AM
Combat philosophy

Low and fast is better than high and slow (in many cases). Speed is life. Turning at high speed and at high G is bad; turning at corner ore at low Gs is much better. Energy for position. Every move cost energy. If you move your nose you spend energy. Spend your E only when it is most useful. Remember Energy Fighters win a fight one turn at a time. Altitude, Speed and Surprise (***) is what you should looking for. Avoid being suckered up (too slow); avoid being suckered down (too fast). SA (Situational Awareness) is the most important part in areal combat; you canít fight what you canít see. Flying around at full power and constantly watch the cockpit gauges for straight flight is not very productive for good SA. Reduce your RPMs (Rounds Per Minute), open radiators and go somewhat higher; so you have a cooler engine, better fuel economy (more flying time). You can spend some altitude to go faster if it is needed. Move you crate in an S and bank it to look at ALL parts of the sky every 5 seconds. Never get sleeped! There is no need to be fast at every moment; you should be fast at the right moments. When at high speed, make small moves. Rolls cost less energy then hauling back on the elevators. Maintain superior altitude and speed. Limit yourself to single passes on the enemy, after which you promptly disengage to regain SA. Donít surround yourself with enemy (as in a furball). Furballer donít live very long. Be patient! The victor is not the guy who flies the best but the one who makes the less mistakes, and every pilot makes mistakes. A typical rookie mistake is to regard guns defence as something that is only intended to make the banditís shot as messy as possible while screaming helplessly for help all the way home to mama. One false move, one stupid mistake, one bullet even, and suddenly itís the enemy whoís on top and brimming with confidence. A typical rookie mistake is to fight in the present without having a real idea or plan of what to do other than what is imminently possible or dictated by reflex.

Manage your engine right! Note the following: Higher speed; more airflow; better cooling. Slow speed; less airflow; bad cooling. High speed; more drag. Slow speed; less drag. Rad open; more drag. Rad closed; less drag. High RPMs; many combustions; a lot of heat. Reduced RPMs; less combustions; less heat. high power (throttle); more fuel can be burned; more heat. Reduced power; less fuel would be burned; less heat. Don't drive your engine too hard until you have E parity or an advantage. manage you engine by thinking about this.

Shooting: firing far away; few hits. Firing close; many hits. Target fast; few hits. Target slow; a lot of hits. Target moved; few hits. Target sleep; bad for him. Firing relaxed and unloaded a concentrated volume of fire; pilot kill. Firing at high Gs and ore wobbling around with the stick; bullet stream spread out; enemy smile. Be stingy with your shots.

~S~
Orville

to be continued ...

additions welcome!

freakvollder
10-04-2009, 08:51 AM
Combat philosophy

Low and fast is better than high and slow (in many cases). Speed is life. Turning at high speed and at high G is bad; turning at corner ore at low Gs is much better. Energy for position. Every move cost energy. If you move your nose you spend energy. Spend your E only when it is most useful. Remember Energy Fighters win a fight one turn at a time. Altitude, Speed and Surprise (***) is what you should looking for. Avoid being suckered up (too slow); avoid being suckered down (too fast). SA (Situational Awareness) is the most important part in areal combat; you canít fight what you canít see. Flying around at full power and constantly watch the cockpit gauges for straight flight is not very productive for good SA. Reduce your RPMs (Rounds Per Minute), open radiators and go somewhat higher; so you have a cooler engine, better fuel economy (more flying time). You can spend some altitude to go faster if it is needed. Move you crate in an S and bank it to look at ALL parts of the sky every 5 seconds. Never get sleeped! There is no need to be fast at every moment; you should be fast at the right moments. When at high speed, make small moves. Rolls cost less energy then hauling back on the elevators. Maintain superior altitude and speed. Limit yourself to single passes on the enemy, after which you promptly disengage to regain SA. Donít surround yourself with enemy (as in a furball). Furballer donít live very long. Be patient! The victor is not the guy who flies the best but the one who makes the less mistakes, and every pilot makes mistakes. A typical rookie mistake is to regard guns defence as something that is only intended to make the banditís shot as messy as possible while screaming helplessly for help all the way home to mama. One false move, one stupid mistake, one bullet even, and suddenly itís the enemy whoís on top and brimming with confidence. A typical rookie mistake is to fight in the present without having a real idea or plan of what to do other than what is imminently possible or dictated by reflex.

Manage your engine right! Note the following: Higher speed; more airflow; better cooling. Slow speed; less airflow; bad cooling. High speed; more drag. Slow speed; less drag. Rad open; more drag. Rad closed; less drag. High RPMs; many combustions; a lot of heat. Reduced RPMs; less combustions; less heat. high power (throttle); more fuel can be burned; more heat. Reduced power; less fuel would be burned; less heat. Don't drive your engine too hard until you have E parity or an advantage. manage you engine by thinking about this.

Shooting: firing far away; few hits. Firing close; many hits. Target fast; few hits. Target slow; a lot of hits. Target moved; few hits. Target sleep; bad for him. Firing relaxed and unloaded a concentrated volume of fire; pilot kill. Firing at high Gs and ore wobbling around with the stick; bullet stream spread out; enemy smile. Be stingy with your shots.

~S~
Orville

to be continued ...

additions welcome!

FoundryWork
10-04-2009, 09:27 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by freakvollder:
to be continued ...
additions welcome! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

We are all a tingle........oh, the agony we will endure until your wisdom again rains down on us!

doraemil
10-05-2009, 01:22 AM
oh hi Orville,

thank you for posting it. Lots of stuff.

I was bored so I cleaned it up a little for you:


Wow, Foundry, you must be truely suffering and should go have a drink to ease your pain, but not too many.



Speed is life. Alot of combat pilots advocate this.


The advantage of low and fast vs high and slow is dependent on the situation.


Turning at high speed and at high G's or gentle curves both on radius and light g's are both legit, two different tools but must be used in the right context.



Energy, this isn't easy to explain. But here goes . . . you have it. Its finite. It has different forms. There are maneuvers that convert different forms of energy, position, altitude, speed etc. Some conversions can be reversed, others you cannot easily exchange. Some lose during certain conversions, others gain. Key is to handle the conversions better than your opponent and use them to get into firing position.


If you can, choose to have some advantage, energy or positioning, or element of surprise, if you can't, then its a learning experience.

Learn how to get in and out of sticky situations. If you get bounced low and slow, there's always something you can do, whilst there not much, say if you were high and fast.


SA is very key. In aerial combat as well as real combat. Look all around you. Lose sight, lose the fight. Gentle turns, banks, and rolls to allow scanning.

Engine management:

RPM's is revolutions per minute. Rounds per minute is gun thing

Open radiators when you need to, or during cruise. Pay attention to the gauges, know which ones to watch when you're exercising certain aspects of CEM. If you and your opponent are equal in terms of craft, and skill, then the pilot that squeezes out that extra by CEM has an advantage.


Speed is dependent on the situation. To conserve speed, remember economy of motions when manuevering, less is better.

Figure out when to roll or when to use the elevators, their conversion of exchange energy and position is different and useful in the right situation.

Higher altitude and more speed than the other guy is a good goal. B n Z is making single passes and disengaging to regain energy.

If you have to disengage to regain SA, you'll probably get rounds in your plane as a result.


Jay Hall had a very good way in dealing with Furballs. He has a guide, which you can do a search for via here and on M4T. Basically you have as short amount of time to go in, make a pass and leave before someone(s) notices you and gets in firing position.

Patience is a virtue. You make less mistakes, and if you make less than your opponent, congratulations, that's an advantage.

The victor IS the guy who flies best, because they make less mistakes. Relatively speaking.

Every pilot makes mistakes. So true.


Hey, you stole the rookie mistake guns defense screaming home to mama off of someone's signature here.

Best guns defense: stay out of range. Second best is make sure you're at an off angle from round trajectory.

One false move, one stupid mistake . . .

Murphy's Law of Combat has these in great detail.

All pilots must have confidence even if the situations going to suck.

No plan survies initial contact


Everyone fights in the present, if you're thinking about the past or the future, you leave out room for SA and not paying attention. However tactics properly applied requires you to think ahead and to learn from the past.


A rookie will fight without knowing other than immediate move or on a reflex. Of course, that's why they're called rookies.

CEM in a nutshell is best explained in the link on bearcat's nuggets thread.

Manage your engine right simplified -&gt; rads open, cooler but drag so you lose some speed. rads closed, less drag so you get speed but engine heats up.

High RPMS -&gt; high pitch and high throttle, can cause over heat. Reduce pitch / throttle, yes I think I'm on to something . . . less RPM's, LESS HEAT!!!

I think I'm going to get a nobel for figuring that out! JUst joshing

Lower RPMs consume less fuel and the opposite is true.


Shooting: get close so they fill up your gunsight / front canopy. UNless you got Marseille skills, then wait them to get in close. Learn about convergence and lead. Fire only when in range of your convergence.

Speed does affects how many hits, but the angle of your plane and direction in relation to your opponent's angle and direction they are going in counts more.


Vultures love slow prey. Yes they do.



A long volley, nice stream / concentrated fire will do a number on that location. UNless its .50 cals (just kidding)

Sometimes a snapshot is all you will get.