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Jutocsa
05-27-2008, 01:44 PM
Franz Künstler (July 24, 1900 – May 27, 2008) was, at age 107, the last known surviving veteran of the First World War who fought for the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Following the death of 110-year-old Ottoman veteran Yakup Satar on April 2, 2008, he was also the last Central Powers veteran of any nationality.

http://www.fn.hu/cikk/00190000/190053/2.jpg


He was born as a Swabian Hungarian in Soost, Hungary (Rumania now).He was drafted in the k.u.k army in 1918 February, and served with HFKR 5. k.u. Feldkanonen-Regiment/ - 5. honvéd tábori ágyúsezred on the Italian front. After the war, he fought against the communists, and was a soldier until 1921. In the Second World War, Künstler served six months in 1942 as a mobile courier in Ukraine. After the war, he was expelled from Hungary, like many thousands of ethnic Germans from many countries. He settled in Niederstetten and worked as a guide in the hunting museum of Schloss Haltenbergstetten castle. As the "last soldier of the Emperor" he got many letters especially from Germany and the USA, mostly asking for a signature. "I should get a secretary", he said.
In an interview given to an Austrian magazine in 2008 at the age of 107, he was asked about "the most important thing in life". He answered: "I was a handsome man and had many women. But more important is to have a good wife, with whom one can share one's life." He died after an operation on his intestine in the southern German town of Niederstetten. Künstler still had plans for the future in March, when he told Cicero magazine: "When I'm 110 the devil can come and get me."



(wikipedia, hungarian and german sources)

Rest in Peace.

Jutocsa
05-27-2008, 01:44 PM
Franz Künstler (July 24, 1900 – May 27, 2008) was, at age 107, the last known surviving veteran of the First World War who fought for the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Following the death of 110-year-old Ottoman veteran Yakup Satar on April 2, 2008, he was also the last Central Powers veteran of any nationality.

http://www.fn.hu/cikk/00190000/190053/2.jpg


He was born as a Swabian Hungarian in Soost, Hungary (Rumania now).He was drafted in the k.u.k army in 1918 February, and served with HFKR 5. k.u. Feldkanonen-Regiment/ - 5. honvéd tábori ágyúsezred on the Italian front. After the war, he fought against the communists, and was a soldier until 1921. In the Second World War, Künstler served six months in 1942 as a mobile courier in Ukraine. After the war, he was expelled from Hungary, like many thousands of ethnic Germans from many countries. He settled in Niederstetten and worked as a guide in the hunting museum of Schloss Haltenbergstetten castle. As the "last soldier of the Emperor" he got many letters especially from Germany and the USA, mostly asking for a signature. "I should get a secretary", he said.
In an interview given to an Austrian magazine in 2008 at the age of 107, he was asked about "the most important thing in life". He answered: "I was a handsome man and had many women. But more important is to have a good wife, with whom one can share one's life." He died after an operation on his intestine in the southern German town of Niederstetten. Künstler still had plans for the future in March, when he told Cicero magazine: "When I'm 110 the devil can come and get me."



(wikipedia, hungarian and german sources)

Rest in Peace.

DKoor
05-27-2008, 01:48 PM
RiP

...

http://www.acompletewasteofspace.com/modules.php?name=F...le=viewtopic&t=16645 (http://www.acompletewasteofspace.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=16645)

leitmotiv
05-27-2008, 01:50 PM
F.W. Buckles, the last living U.S. WWI veteran (106---a mere baby compared to some of the hardy British survivors), was at the (U.S.) National World War One Museum in Kansas City over the just past Memorial Day weekend. Here is information about the Museum. As far as I know, it is the only museum on this scale devoted to just WWI.

http://www.libertymemorialmuseum.org/index.aspx

TTU_Phoenix
05-27-2008, 01:57 PM
Wow... And I heard that France's last WWI veteran died a couple of months ago... There aren't many left.

Daiichidoku
05-27-2008, 02:10 PM
werent many left over to begin with http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

leitmotiv
05-27-2008, 02:31 PM
Baloney, Avro pointed out to me that recent scholarship in the UK indicated the percentage of dead in the British Army in WWI was no greater than previously encountered in major wars fought by the British. When you look at the numbers of dead and wounded after a Napoleonic bloodbath like Wagram, and consider them as percentages of soldiers engaged, it's sobering. Of course no Army in WWI, except possibly the Serbian, lost as high a percentage of forces engaged as Napoleon did in Russia in 1812.

Metatron_123
05-27-2008, 06:24 PM
R.I.P.

Leitmotiv, that is interesting.

What always shocks me about the Napoleonic wars is how intricate and fancy the uniforms were, makes me wonder what the point was, seeing how many were killed.

leitmotiv
05-27-2008, 08:40 PM
I suppose, when the most you could offer the soldiers was loot, lousy pay, and whippings, the uniforms had to look good!

Von_Rat
05-28-2008, 12:11 AM
i would imagine the fanciness of the uniforms had more to do with the commanders ego than the troops desires.

some of the colorfullness of the uniforms was to help unit recognition and things like tall hats was to supposedly help imtimate enemys by making your guys look bigger. not much help after everybody starts doing it.


speaking of bloodbaths, the roman defeat in the battle of cannea cause what, 60,000 dead romans in a afternoon? sorta makes the 1st day of the somme look not so bad by comparison.

leitmotiv
05-28-2008, 12:42 AM
That's right, except for rare slaughters like the Korsun Pocket in '44, there are few incidents of mass annihilation in modern warfare. Imagine a whole army put to the sword like at Cannae---it staggers the mind.

Badsight-
05-28-2008, 02:14 AM
the uniform was a badge of honour

in an age of drudgery (for the common folk) , seeing a soldier parading around in that get-up was major PR brownie points