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View Full Version : What IS a supercharger, anyhow?



chunkydora
06-18-2008, 06:48 PM
I know what they do in the game, I know how to switch them, but dagnabit what is the darn thing? Does it-- charge? Superly? How? Why will the engine blow up if stage 2 is used at too low altitudes? I feel so foolish. Climibing to high altitudes, switching the supercharger, diving low, switching it back, and I suddenly realized I have no idea what it is! OH, THE SHAME!
http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif

That picture is what I'll do to the one who tells me what a supercharger is.

Thanks mates!

chunkydora
06-18-2008, 06:48 PM
I know what they do in the game, I know how to switch them, but dagnabit what is the darn thing? Does it-- charge? Superly? How? Why will the engine blow up if stage 2 is used at too low altitudes? I feel so foolish. Climibing to high altitudes, switching the supercharger, diving low, switching it back, and I suddenly realized I have no idea what it is! OH, THE SHAME!
http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif

That picture is what I'll do to the one who tells me what a supercharger is.

Thanks mates!

Jambock_Dolfo
06-18-2008, 06:50 PM
Basically it blows air into the engine, to compensate reduced air density at altitude.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbocharger

-dolfo

PanzerAce
06-18-2008, 07:07 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jambock_Dolfo:
Basically it blows air into the engine, to compensate reduced air density at altitude.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turbocharger

-dolfo </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm pretty sure you wanted this link instead http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supercharger

Basically, it is a gear/belt/chain driven air compressor to increase the volumetric efficiency of the engine, thus generating more power for a given engine size.

Uufflakke
06-19-2008, 12:03 AM
All info about Complex Engine Management, including supercharger, you can find here:

http://www.mission4today.com/index.php?name=Knowledge_B...=show&kid=249&page=4 (http://www.mission4today.com/index.php?name=Knowledge_Base&op=show&kid=249&page=4)

Kurfurst__
06-19-2008, 12:37 AM
Its basically a fancy name for an air compressor supplying the engine with compressed air, as oxygene is of course needed to burn the fuel and operate the engine.

It has two uses. First, air density decreases with altitude considerably, so you will need something to compensate for that.

Second, the power of the engine is roughly equivalent to the amount of fuel burned in it. More fuel, more power. And to burn more fuel you need more oxygene, more air. Hence the outside air is taken into a compressor, compressed to higher than ambient pressure (usuallly 1,5 to ca 2,3 atmosphere pressure, ie. 1,5 to 2,3 times of the normal pressure), so you can supply more air to the engine in the same volume. Twice the air, twice the power. This is called supercharging.

There are two basic forms of supercharging on aircraft, depending on what drives the compressor itself. With mechanical superchargers, power to the compressor is provided by the engine itself. On turbosuperchargers, the compressor is driven by a miniature propellor, or turbine, placed in the exhaust piping, driven by the exhaust gases from the engine.

These are very high performance compressors we talk about here - on the R-R Griffon, the fully running supercharger for example consumed as much as 600 (six-hundred!) horsepower!

julian265
06-19-2008, 12:44 AM
It does more than compensate for density reduction at altitude - they (and/or a turbocharger) are ESSENTIAL for getting the most power at ALL altitudes.

Manifold pressure (controlled mostly with the throttle) is a measurement of the pressure of the air entering the engine - it's roughly a measure of how much air mass you're putting into each cylinder each cycle. To get the most power, you want as much manifold pressure as possible, however practical limitations are quickly encountered when it is increased.

More power from more pressure will naturally make more heat, which might exceed the coolant's transfer capacity, or even weaken the internals of the engine, or degrade the oil.

Secondly, burning petrol/gas at higher pressures becomes difficult and risky if pushed too far - the likelihood of the mixture detonating rather than burning smoothly increases with pressure (and temperature, which also increases when the air is compressed). Detonation has catastrophic results, usually shown by a hole through the side of the engine block made by a snapped con rod. (the con rod bends and breaks when the mixture detonates, and it's broken stump then strikes the engine block wall, and blows it outward)

Unlike cars, high performance aircraft are designed to operate well at a large range of altitudes. The requirements of superchargers change depending on the input (atmospheric) and output (manifold) pressures. This necessitates supercharger stages or gears - which vary how fast the supercharger is driven relative to engine RPM. It simply needs to be driven faster as atmo pressure reduces, to deliver the same manifold pressure.

In stage 1 (IL2) or neutral (some real fighters), the supercharger is in full operation, just in it's lowest gear ratio.

chunkydora
06-19-2008, 01:32 AM
Thank you guys SO much!

It was simply horrible. I know the basics of flight, engine etc. but here was this supercharger staring me in the face and I had no idea what the heck it really was
http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif
http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif
http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif http://media.ubi.com/us/forum_images/gf-glomp.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

SeaFireLIV
06-19-2008, 01:47 AM
It`s not so bad. We all use stuff everyday and have no idea how it actually works.

joeap
06-19-2008, 03:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by SeaFireLIV:
It`s not so bad. We all use stuff everyday and have no idea how it actually works. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No offense to the guys who flew during the war, but I'll bet that was true of a large proportion of them as well.